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Games: Super Powered Battle Friends, Geneshift, OBS Studio, DASH

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Gaming
  • 2D indie platform brawler 'Super Powered Battle Friends' is now up on Steam and itch.io

    Super Powered Battle Friends from Cache Grab Studios is a new platform fighter, with both local and online play and it's now in Early Access. As promised on the rather unsuccessful Kickstarter campaign, it was release with same-day Linux support.

  • Geneshift gets a GTA2-inspired update with civilians, an expanded demo, better maps for driving and more

    Geneshift continues to evolve into a very interesting top-down action game, mixing in a single-player/co-op campaign, various traditional multiple modes and a Battle Royale.

    The developer, Nik Nak Studios, said they're celebrating ten years since Geneshift first came online (originally under other names). This latest update pulls in some inspiration from GTA2, adding in roaming civilians you can take down which will eventually become aggressive towards you. The more you kill, the higher their aggression rating and loot dropping will be giving the various online modes like Deathmatch and Battle Royale a little mini-game.

  • Video recording and livestreaming software OBS Studio has a new 23.2 Release Candidate out

    For those who create videos and livestreams, OBS Studio is for the most part all you need. It continues advancing too, with a Release Candidate out for OBS 23.2.

    New features this time around include a hotkey to toggle the preview, the ability to preview scene transitions, the ability to estimate recording time available based on disk space (not that I've seen it, might be Windows only), a "luma" key video filter, the ability to copy and paste filter to/from scenes in addition to sources, the ability to centre items vertically or horizontally in the transform menus, a message when there's no sources included in a scene to help new users and numerous other enhancements.

  • DASH, the fast-paced platformer where you create the levels is launching in June with a new trailer

    Best get your running shoes, you're going to need them to compete in DASH: Danger Action Speed Heroes. This fast-paced competitive platformer from Baby Duka and Schubell IT will also let your creative juices flow since a lot of the levels are made by people like you and me.

Games: Google Stadia and More Ports to GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Google Stadia GPU To Be Based on 14nm AMD Vega Architecture

    The details of Google Stadia GPU have been leaked online. The streaming console from Google will use a Vega Graphics from AMD, instead of the speculated Navi.

    The information comes from the Khronos’ Vulcan API product listings. The Google Stadia is listed as “Google Games Platform Gen 1 AMD GCN 1.5)”

  • A quick look at some fun games & expansions released with Linux support in 2019 so far

    We’re closing in on the midway point of 2019 so let’s slow down for a moment, take a step back and look at some of the top games released with Linux support so far this year.

    Note: I am not counting Early Access or in-Beta titles and only including games that support Linux, so for those looking for something new you can expect a full completable experience with any of these titles. Also, it’s in no particular order as this isn’t meant as a best to worse compilation. Also, some may have had their official Linux releases later than the other platforms.

  • Oxygen Not Included release delayed until July, Klei making sure it's nicely polished

    Klei Entertainment have decided to delayed the full release of Oxygen Not Included, with it moving to July.

    They're going to have open testing around the end of June, sounds like it's all going well but sometimes extra time is just needed. Game development is complicated and Oxygen Not Included needs some more testing and polishing. They said "We’re feeling good about the content of this final update and we really think you will like what we have cooking but if we launch as scheduled, the update would not have seen much testing and it’s just not as polished as we (or you) would like.".

  • Terraria has sold 27 million copies, 12 million on PC and it continues to expand

    Re-Logic have announced that Terraria has officially sold a massive 27 million copies, 12 million of those being on PC and they're not stopping.

    Sounds like it's going to be a big year for Terraria, they're teasing some big updates for the PC version. Sounds like they might be showing some new stuff off during the 2019 PC Gaming Show next month, although they made it clear they're "not going to be the latest Epic exclusive" and they will stay on Steam like they've been since the beginning.

  • Point & click adventure 'Lord Winklebottom Investigates' fully funded and coming to Linux

    Lord Winklebottom Investigates, a very quirky murder mystery, point and click adventure has managed to get funding and so it's coming to Linux.

  • Minimalistic puzzle game 'Simple Dot' looks rough but it's an interesting experience overall

    Simple Dot has a simple idea, balls drop from a bucket and you have to draw lines to get them into a bucket somewhere else. It's out now with same-day Linux support and I gave it a run to see if it's worth your time.

Games: Deadly Days, Gaming Performance, Creating Evscaperoom

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Gaming
  • Deadly Days, the strategic zombie group-survival rogue-lite keeps on improving

    I'm really starting to like what Deadly Days is turning into. It's an Early Access game about directing a group of survivors through a Zombie apocalypse and it's really taking shape now.

    I've tested this one on and off since sometime around March last year, back then it was nothing but a shell. An interesting idea but it didn't really go anywhere. Pixelsplit now seem to have firmly found their feet, with each update making parts of the game make more sense, become bigger and more interesting. It's now actually more of a survival game and not just a town exploration game with zombies.

  • Gaming Performance Only Faintly Touched By MDS / Zombie Load Mitigations

    Yesterday I published some initial MDS/Zombieload mitigation impact benchmarks while coming out still later today is much more data looking at the CPU/system performance impact... But is the gaming performance impaired by this latest set of CPU side-channel vulnerabilities?

    With the Spectre/Meltdown mitigations, the gaming performance fortunately wasn't impaired by those mitigations. In fact, it was pretty much dead flat. With my testing thus far of the MDS/Zombieload mitigations on Linux, there does appear to be a slight difference in the rather CPU-bound scenarios compared to Spectre/Meltdown, but still it should be negligible for gamers. Well, that is at least with the higher-end hardware tested thus far, over the weekend I'll be running some gaming tests on some low-end processors/GPUs.

  • Creating Evscaperoom, part 1

    Over the last month (April-May 2019) I have taken part in the Mud Coder's Guild Game Jam "Enter the (Multi-User) Dungeon". This year the theme for the jam was One Room.

    The result was Evscaperoom, an text-based multi-player "escape-room" written in Python using the Evennia MU* creation system. You can play it from that link in your browser or MU*-client of choice. If you are so inclined, you can also vote for it here in the jam (don't forget to check out the other entries while you're at it).

    This little series of (likely two) dev-blog entries will try to recount the planning and technical aspects of the Evscaperoom. This is also for myself - I'd better write stuff down now while it's still fresh in my mind!

Games: Deep Rock Galactic, Surviving Mars, Warhammer and More

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Gaming
  • Deep Rock Galactic continues being some of the most fun I've had in a while, thanks to Steam Play

    Deep Rock Galactic, a game about badass space Dwarves mining for goodies and one I've highlighted before continues to be awesome with Steam Play on Linux. It just had a rather sweet update too.

    Update 24, the "Explosive Expansion" was released yesterday adding in a ton of new types of grenades. Each class in Deep Rock can now unlock up to three unique class-specific throwable items too and it sounds like more are on the way.

  • Turn the red planet green in Surviving Mars: Green Planet out now, along with the Armstrong free update

    Haemimont Games and Paradox Interactive have today released three things for Surviving Mars! There's the Surviving Mars: Green Planet expansion, the smaller Project Laika DLC for animals and the free Armstrong update for everyone.

  • Warhammer 40,000: Gladius is about to get a little hectic, as the Chaos Space Marines are on their way

    Warhammer 40,000: Gladius - Relics of War just recently gained a nice update and an expansion announcement, with the Chaos Space Marines.

    Firstly, the update which was released yesterday includes a new Hotseat Mode, that allows you to play on the same computer or send away your saved games to play with others. Quite an interesting way to do it, between turns it will pause and cover the screen (according to what they say) allowing you time to switch. Additionally, it adds in a new neutral Cultist unit, improved notifications, balance updates and a few bug fixes.

  • Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus just had a big update and Heretek expansion announcement

    Now is a good time to take command of The Adeptus Mechanicus once again, as the big Augment Update is out with a ton of new goodies. It's also expanding with the Heretek DLC.

    Firstly, the Augment Update which had a beta up for a few weeks is now live. Should give you a number of reasons to jump back in for another few turns. It includes an IronMan Mode, Difficulty Settings with lots of customization possible, a ton of polish has been done to the explorations, the UI also had some polishing work done, cleaner Fonts and a new Turkish localisation.

  • A look at all the good deals going ahead of the weekend, come find a bargain

    Hello bargain hunters! It's almost the weekend, so let's take a look at some good deals you can find right now so you have something fresh to play.

  • Risk System looks like a shoot 'em up not to be missed, out with Linux support

    I will admit, I almost missed Risk System thinking it's just another retro-looking shoot 'em up but upon closer inspection it actually looks and sounds pretty damn good.

    The trailer they put out for their launch is pretty awesome too (see below). Not just that, it seems the full opening is entirely retro-Anime art with fantastic music too. The production value that's gone into this seems to be a lot higher than your usual shoot 'em up and I don't remember hearing about it before.

  • Dungeons 3 - Famous Last Words, the real "final" DLC is out today and a new free map for everyone

    Do you love being evil? Do you consider yourself a master of dungeons? Well Dungeons 3 is pretty good and the "final" DLC Famous Last Words is out today, with a free patch.

  • Satirical adventure Irony Curtain: From Matryoshka with Love from Artifex Mundi is out

    Artifex Mundi have once again branched out from a lot of their hidden object games, to give us a satirical point and click adventure with Irony Curtain: From Matryoshka with Love.

    The game is set in an alternate reality, so it's not tied to any real history so it's able to play with the setting. Artifex Mundi said it's inspired by the classics, while not requiring you to hunt down pixels. It's also fully voiced in English, with subtitles in Polish and German.

  • Sandbox tycoon-like trading game 'Merchant of the Skies' has a new trailer and a later release date

    Merchant of the Skies from Coldwild Games, seems like it could be an interesting resource management and trading game with you flying around the world in an airship. There's a new trailer and a delay in the release.

  • The Battle Royale game 'Crazy Justice' is apparently still alive, Black Riddles Studio show new footage

    It's had a bit of a history this one, something I've covered a few times due to my own minor obsession with Battle Royale games. My disappointment has been rather high though, as Black Riddles Studio have to be one of the most uncommunicative developers I've come across in some time now.

    As a quick reminder, Crazy Justice had a Fig crowdfunding campaign that was successful at raising over $73K since it ended. Since then they've teased plenty, gone completely silent for weeks and months at a time, released a very broken backer-only beta, went silent again, released an updated and still quite broken beta and now they're apparently back…again.

  • Strangers - Awaken, a magical themed Battle Royale is on Kickstarter and plans Linux support

    I've been chatting to the developer of Strangers - Awaken recently, a new cross-platform Battle Royale game where magic is your weapon and it's now live on Kickstarter. They're promising it to be a fully cross-platform experience which includes Linux, Mac, Windows and mobiles (Consoles too if they hit some stretch goals).

    Interestingly, it's not a fully standard BR experience as it will have character levelling so it's also partly more like an action-RPG with a skill tree, missions and so on. Each match will be around 15 minutes, as you take down enemies and loot them for new items. They say it won't have any pay to win nonsense either, which is good because such a game would be utterly ruined by any hint of a pay to advance system.

Games: Metroidvania “Mable and the Wood”, Benchmarks and More

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Gaming
  • Metroidvania “Mable and the Wood” Launches this Summer; Windows, Linux, Mac, Switch, and Xbox One

    Originally said to be for Windows PC, Linux and Mac, the game is also now confirmed for Nintendo Switch and Xbox One.

  • Over 100 Linux Gaming/Graphics Tests Looking At The Radeon RX 570 vs. GTX 1650

    Complementing the recent comparison of Radeon RX 560/570/580 vs. GeForce GTX 1060/1650/1660 Linux Gaming Performance benchmarks, in this article are 102 Linux graphics tests (mostly games) looking more closely at the performance of the sub-$150 GeForce GTX 1650 and Radeon RX 570 graphics cards.

  • Retro-inspired 2D action RPG 'CrossCode' adds in arena battles, pets you can give rubs and more

    CrossCode is a fantastic game, a retro-inspired 2D action RPG from Radical Fish Games and it's continuing to expand after release with a big update now out.

    One of the biggest additions in this update, is a new arena battle system found in Rhombus Square. So if you especially enjoy the combat in CrossCode, there's now a whole lot more possible.

  • Raise an undead army of chickens in Undead Horde from 10tons, now out and my thoughts

    Do you like being on the evil side? Good news for you then, as a necromancer you will be raising an undead army in Undead Horde, which is now out with Linux support.

  • Magical action game 'Wizard of Legend' adds more end-game content with a Boss Rush mode and more

    Wizard of Legend is a really great game, especially when you play it in local co-op I've had an absolutely blast. Now it's even better once you've finished the main wizard trials.

    The game has been out for a whole year now, so this update is part of the one year anniversary celebration for it. It's done well too, as it was announced back in July last year that it had surpassed 500K copies sold.

    The "Boss Rush Update" went live yesterday and as the name might suggest, a new Boss Rush mode has been added for those who've completed the main Chaos Trials. Additionally, you can also now access the Hard mode if you're up for the challenge. Both of these modes are available from an NPC in the little plaza area.

  • A new and quite interesting Steam Client Beta is out, nice Linux fixes and Vulkan shader downloading

    Valve put out a brand new Steam Client Beta yesterday and it sounds like a pretty good one, with Linux issues getting some more attention.

    Firstly though, they've re-named In-Home Streaming to Steam Remote Play, since the Steam client can now stream games to any other client both inside and outside your home. Additionally, your paired Steam Link devices will now show up in the Remote Play settings and you can remove all paired Steam Link devices.

    The next interesting bit is for Vulkan, as Valve have re-worked their shader system so it's capable of downloading and pre-compiling the whole collection of Vulkan pipelines for games. So we will now see shader data downloads in Steam and pre-compiling will be enabled in a "future Beta build". This is exciting, hopefully when this is fully enabled, it will make Vulkan games super smooth for both native and Steam Play.

Games Leftovers

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Gaming
  • Ironhide Game Studio's real-time strategy game Iron Marines sees day-1 Linux support

    This is fantastic, Iron Marines from Ironhide Game Studio just released today and they decided to get the Linux version ready to go one day-1. Disclosure: Key provided by the developer.

    For those not familiar with the developer, this is the studio behind hits like Kingdom Rush and the various sequels. Their games are usually very stylish and this is certainly no different. Iron Marines is a sci-fi real-time strategy game and it's actually quite a bit different to their usual stuff.

  • My Free Software Activities in April 2019

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

    [...]

    This was a very quiet month compared to pre-freeze time. I reported three security vulnerabilities for Teeworlds (#927152) which were later fixed by Dylan Aïssi. Thank you.

    I also reviewed and sponsored a new revision of OpenMW for Bret Curtis. I’m not sure why he didn’t ask the release team for an unblock but there may be a reason.

  • Valve Pushes Out Big Steam Beta Update, Linux Changes & Steam Remote Play

    Valve issued a new Steam beta release that contains a lot of changes across the board, including Linux.

    This Steam beta update has a number of Steam overlay fixes, Steam In-Home Streaming is now experimentally available "outside of the home" as Steam Remote Play, a variety of Steam Input improvements, a reworked shader system to allow downloading/pre-compiling a whole set of Vulkan pipelines for a given game, and various other fixes.

GeForce GTX 650 vs. GTX 1650 Performance For Linux Gaming, Performance-Per-Watt

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

The latest in our benchmarking with the new GeForce GTX 1650 is some "fun" tests seeing how its performance compares to that of the GeForce GTX 650 Kepler. Various OpenGL and Vulkan Linux gaming tests were carried out as well as some compute tests and throughout monitoring the AC power consumption to yield the performance-per-Watt metrics.

The GeForce GTX 650 Kepler graphics card launched nearly seven years ago already with its 40nm GK107 GPU that provided 384 CUDA cores, 1058MHz core clock speed, and 1GB of GDDR5 video memory. The GTX 650 has a 64 Watt TDP but came with a 6-pin PCIe power connector. The GTX 650 / Kepler is the last generation currently supported by the mainline Linux driver and also the oldest NVIDIA hardware with Vulkan driver coverage, making this comparison particularly interesting.

The GeForce GTX 1650 meanwhile with its 12nm TU117 GPU has 896 CUDA cores, 1485MHz base clock speed, 1665MHz boost clock speed, and 4GB of GDDR5 video memory. The GeForce GTX 1650 has a 75 Watt TDP without the need for any external PCIe power connection.

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Games: SteamWorld, Valve and a Lot More

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Gaming
  • SteamWorld Quest Flips the Switch to Linux, Mac, and PC on May 31

    SteamWorld Quest is coming to new platforms later the month.

  • Counter-Strike: Global Offensive updated again - watch live events, Danger Zone updates and more

    Valve seem to have a renewed focus on Counter-Strike: Global Offensive lately, with a lot of regular updates. This latest one has some fun new toys.

  • Don't Starve: Hamlet expansion has officially left Early Access

    Klei Entertainment have expanded their weird and wonderful survival game with Don't Starve: Hamlet, which has now left Early Access. Sounds like a pretty fun expansion too, as Wilson has discovered a lost town of "aristocratic Pigmen" hiding out in a foreboding tropical jungle

  • Hegemone Pass, a 2D stealth RPG that will support Linux is on Kickstarter

    I like the sound of this alert system, as if you get spotted they don't just chase you, they will actually sound the alarm and end up calling in some reinforcements and any neighbouring enemies will jump in to help them against you. If there's a lot of them, you might end up facing off against an additional wave of enemies.

    Actual combat is turn-based with a timeline to show when someone will be available, although you can mess with this. Some attacks will allow you to push people back which would be handy if you're running low of health.

    They're hoping to get €16K, with the campaign set to end of June 10th. They've had a bit of a slow start, looks like it might struggle a bit as they've not even managed to gather €400 yet.

  • Funny looking abstract puzzle adventure 'Kindergarten' is getting a sequel, out in June

    I totally missed the fact that Kindergarten 2 was actually announced all the way back in 2017. I still haven't played the original but I know a lot of people enjoyed it. It's going to be a bigger game this time too, with a promise of "new ways to get ruthlessly murdered".

    There's going to be plenty of new story missions, new environments, collectible cards and unlockable outfits. The description is amusing too, going over activities you can expect to do like helping the teacher get their fix—oh my.

  • The Swords of Ditto is a much better and more interesting game with Mormo's Curse

    It's had a bit of a rough history, especially on Linux. With the original release, it had problems with invisible walls making it basically impossible to continue. Those issues have been long solved but another problem was that before the forced permadeath made it hard to properly experience it and enjoy it. Now that's no longer forced, you can have a much better time with it and I certainly have.

  • Beautiful action-adventure set inside the human mind, Figment, to expand with Figment: Creed Valley

    Figment: Creed Valley is an "encore" to the original beautiful action-adventure game Figment, one that will continue the story of the original game. When checking out the original Figment back in 2017, I said "Few games catch me completely by surprise with their beauty as well as their gameplay" and I totally stand by that. It's a game I remember very well, it truly left a lasting impression. More of that is going to be awesome, especially with the unique setting deep inside the human mind.

  • While there's no date for the Linux version of Insurgency: Sandstorm, NWI remain committed to do it

    New World Interactive held a Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything) earlier this week for Insurgency: Sandstorm and naturally there was a question about the upcoming Linux version which they answered.

    Originally, they said they were hoping Linux version of Sandstorm would come in the first few updates. Sadly, that didn't happen and we've been left waiting while they improve various aspects of the game. A common complaint seems to be performance, with lots of posts and reviews talking about it needing to be improved.

Games: Valve's Wine-based Proton, Debian-based SteamOS and SteamWorld Quest: Hand of Gilgamech

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Gaming
  • Proton 4.2-4 Released With Fix For RAGE 2, Updated DXVK

    Valve has just released Proton 4.2-4 as their newest downstream of Wine that is used by Steam Play for running Steam Windows games on Linux.

    Proton 4.2-4 pulls in DXVK 1.1.1 as a big update itself. Making Proton 4.2-4 more interesting is a fix for the new RAGE 2 game though for it to run you also need to be using Mesa Git.

  • SteamOS had another beta update recently, new Steam Play Proton version 4.2-4 is out

    Two bits of Valve news to cover tonight: SteamOS gains a new beta version and it looks like Steam Play Proton will be getting an update soon.

    Let's start with SteamOS, Valve's own-brand Linux distribution, mainly aimed at living-room console-style boxes for a large screen experience. It's still going and the 2.190 beta version is now out for those who've chosen to live on the edge with the brewmaster_beta. It's not a big one, with it including mainly security updates and firmware-nonfree updates. Looks like Timothee "TTimo" Besset (formely id Software, helped to port Rocket League to Linux - see my previous interview) is currently keeping it going.

  • SteamWorld Quest releasing end of May on Steam with Linux support

    SteamWorld Quest: Hand of Gilgamech mixes things up, again, as this time it's a roleplaying card game and it's releasing on May 31st. Currently, they've only said it will be on Steam so far.

    SteamWorld Quest originally released first on the Nintendo Switch, where it has gone onto receiving plenty of high praise. This makes me happy, considering I also enjoyed the previous games.

    The press email was very clear on platforms too "Coming soon to Windows, macOS and Linux!", so there's no need to guess with this. Not surprising though, since Image & Form Games have supported Linux nicely with the previous SteamWorld games but it's still great to see it confirmed.

Games: Jupiter Hell, Minecraft on Flathub, Stellaris: Ancient Relics, Mushroom Crusher Extreme

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More in Tux Machines

My personal journey from MIT to GPL

As I got started writing open source software, I generally preferred the MIT license. I actually made fun of the “copyleft” GPL licenses, on the grounds that they are less free. I still hold this opinion today: the GPL license is less free than the MIT license - but today, I believe this in a good way.

[...]

I don’t plan on relicensing my historical projects, but my new projects have used the GPL family of licenses for a while now. I think you should seriously consider it as well.

Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Yubico recalls government-grade security keys due security bug

    If you buy a government-grade security key, the one thing you really want from it is government-grade security. It's the very dictionary definition of "you had one job." That's why it's somewhat embarrassing that Yubico has put out a recall notice on its FIPS series of authentication keys which, it turns out, aren't completely secure.

  • [Microsoft's] EternalBlue exploit surfaces in bog standard mining attack Featured

    A bog standard attack aimed at planting a cryptocurrency miner has been found to be using advanced targeted attack tools as well, the security firm Trend Micro says, pointing out that this behaviour marks a departure from the norm.

Kernel: Systemd, DXVK, Intel and AMD

  • Systemd Is Now Seeing Continuous Fuzzing By Fuzzit
    In hoping to catch more bugs quickly, systemd now has continuous fuzzing integration via the new "Fuzzit" platform that provides continuous fuzzing as a service.  New this week to systemd is the continuous fuzzing integration where every pull request / push will see some quick checks carried out while on a daily basis will be fuzzed in full for all targets.
  •  
  • DXVK 1.2.2 Brings Minor CPU Overhead Optimizations, Game Fixes
    In time for those planning to spend some time this weekend gaming, DXVK lead developer Philip Rebohle announced the release of DXVK 1.2.2 that will hopefully soon be integrated as part of a Proton update for Steam Play but right now can be built from source. While certain upstream Wine developers express DXVK being a "dead end" and are optimistic in favor of piping their WineD3D implementation over Vulkan, for Linux gamers today wanting to enjoy D3D11 Windows games on Linux the DXVK library continues working out splendid with great performance and running many Direct3D games with much better performance over the current WineD3D OpenGL code.
  • Intel 19.23.13131 OpenCL NEO Stack Adds Comet Lake Support
    We've seen the Intel Comet Lake support get pieced together in recent months in the different components making up the Intel Linux graphics stack while the compute-runtime is the latest addition. Comet Lake as a refresher is a planned successor to Coffeelake/Whiskeylake and expected to come out this year as yet more 9th Gen hardware. But Comet Lake should be interesting with rumored 10-core designs. Though with being more processors with Gen9 graphics, the Comet Lake Linux support basically boils down to adding in the new PCI IDs.
  • AMD Wires Its New Runtime Linker Into RadeonSI Gallium3D
    RadeonSI Gallium3D has already shifted over to using this new linker. Making use of the .rodata should help with efficiencies throughout the driver (more details in this forum thread) but at this point is mostly laying the groundwork for more improvements to be made moving forward.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

  • Building IT Transformation Architecture with Red Hat OpenShift
    In the era of mobile applications, business challenges to the enterprise IT organizations are more dynamic than ever. Many enterprises have difficulties responding in time because of the inherent complexity and risk of integrating emerging technologies into existing IT architectures. In this article, I will share my experience on how to utilize Red Hat OpenShift as a “Middle Platform” (中台) for enterprises to construct its bimodal IT architecture with agile, scalable and open strategy. In the past year, I have discussed with many corporate customers–especially in the financial services industry–the challenges of digital transformation, and the solutions. Most of their difficulties are coming from “core systems” which have been working for more than 10 years.
  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-24
    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Elections voting is open through 23:59 UTC on Thursday 20 June. I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.
  • Copr's Dist-Git
    In Copr, we use dist-git to store sources as well. However, our use case is different. In the past, Copr only allowed to build from URL. You provided a URL to your SRC.RPM and Copr downloaded it and built it. This was a problem when the user wanted to resubmit the build. The original URL very often did not exists anymore. Therefore we came with an idea to store the SRC.RPM somewhere. And obviously, the dist-git was the first idea.