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Games: Google Stadia and More Ports to GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Google Stadia GPU To Be Based on 14nm AMD Vega Architecture

    The details of Google Stadia GPU have been leaked online. The streaming console from Google will use a Vega Graphics from AMD, instead of the speculated Navi.

    The information comes from the Khronos’ Vulcan API product listings. The Google Stadia is listed as “Google Games Platform Gen 1 AMD GCN 1.5)”

  • A quick look at some fun games & expansions released with Linux support in 2019 so far

    We’re closing in on the midway point of 2019 so let’s slow down for a moment, take a step back and look at some of the top games released with Linux support so far this year.

    Note: I am not counting Early Access or in-Beta titles and only including games that support Linux, so for those looking for something new you can expect a full completable experience with any of these titles. Also, it’s in no particular order as this isn’t meant as a best to worse compilation. Also, some may have had their official Linux releases later than the other platforms.

  • Oxygen Not Included release delayed until July, Klei making sure it's nicely polished

    Klei Entertainment have decided to delayed the full release of Oxygen Not Included, with it moving to July.

    They're going to have open testing around the end of June, sounds like it's all going well but sometimes extra time is just needed. Game development is complicated and Oxygen Not Included needs some more testing and polishing. They said "We’re feeling good about the content of this final update and we really think you will like what we have cooking but if we launch as scheduled, the update would not have seen much testing and it’s just not as polished as we (or you) would like.".

  • Terraria has sold 27 million copies, 12 million on PC and it continues to expand

    Re-Logic have announced that Terraria has officially sold a massive 27 million copies, 12 million of those being on PC and they're not stopping.

    Sounds like it's going to be a big year for Terraria, they're teasing some big updates for the PC version. Sounds like they might be showing some new stuff off during the 2019 PC Gaming Show next month, although they made it clear they're "not going to be the latest Epic exclusive" and they will stay on Steam like they've been since the beginning.

  • Point & click adventure 'Lord Winklebottom Investigates' fully funded and coming to Linux

    Lord Winklebottom Investigates, a very quirky murder mystery, point and click adventure has managed to get funding and so it's coming to Linux.

  • Minimalistic puzzle game 'Simple Dot' looks rough but it's an interesting experience overall

    Simple Dot has a simple idea, balls drop from a bucket and you have to draw lines to get them into a bucket somewhere else. It's out now with same-day Linux support and I gave it a run to see if it's worth your time.

Games: Deadly Days, Gaming Performance, Creating Evscaperoom

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Gaming
  • Deadly Days, the strategic zombie group-survival rogue-lite keeps on improving

    I'm really starting to like what Deadly Days is turning into. It's an Early Access game about directing a group of survivors through a Zombie apocalypse and it's really taking shape now.

    I've tested this one on and off since sometime around March last year, back then it was nothing but a shell. An interesting idea but it didn't really go anywhere. Pixelsplit now seem to have firmly found their feet, with each update making parts of the game make more sense, become bigger and more interesting. It's now actually more of a survival game and not just a town exploration game with zombies.

  • Gaming Performance Only Faintly Touched By MDS / Zombie Load Mitigations

    Yesterday I published some initial MDS/Zombieload mitigation impact benchmarks while coming out still later today is much more data looking at the CPU/system performance impact... But is the gaming performance impaired by this latest set of CPU side-channel vulnerabilities?

    With the Spectre/Meltdown mitigations, the gaming performance fortunately wasn't impaired by those mitigations. In fact, it was pretty much dead flat. With my testing thus far of the MDS/Zombieload mitigations on Linux, there does appear to be a slight difference in the rather CPU-bound scenarios compared to Spectre/Meltdown, but still it should be negligible for gamers. Well, that is at least with the higher-end hardware tested thus far, over the weekend I'll be running some gaming tests on some low-end processors/GPUs.

  • Creating Evscaperoom, part 1

    Over the last month (April-May 2019) I have taken part in the Mud Coder's Guild Game Jam "Enter the (Multi-User) Dungeon". This year the theme for the jam was One Room.

    The result was Evscaperoom, an text-based multi-player "escape-room" written in Python using the Evennia MU* creation system. You can play it from that link in your browser or MU*-client of choice. If you are so inclined, you can also vote for it here in the jam (don't forget to check out the other entries while you're at it).

    This little series of (likely two) dev-blog entries will try to recount the planning and technical aspects of the Evscaperoom. This is also for myself - I'd better write stuff down now while it's still fresh in my mind!

Games: Deep Rock Galactic, Surviving Mars, Warhammer and More

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Gaming
  • Deep Rock Galactic continues being some of the most fun I've had in a while, thanks to Steam Play

    Deep Rock Galactic, a game about badass space Dwarves mining for goodies and one I've highlighted before continues to be awesome with Steam Play on Linux. It just had a rather sweet update too.

    Update 24, the "Explosive Expansion" was released yesterday adding in a ton of new types of grenades. Each class in Deep Rock can now unlock up to three unique class-specific throwable items too and it sounds like more are on the way.

  • Turn the red planet green in Surviving Mars: Green Planet out now, along with the Armstrong free update

    Haemimont Games and Paradox Interactive have today released three things for Surviving Mars! There's the Surviving Mars: Green Planet expansion, the smaller Project Laika DLC for animals and the free Armstrong update for everyone.

  • Warhammer 40,000: Gladius is about to get a little hectic, as the Chaos Space Marines are on their way

    Warhammer 40,000: Gladius - Relics of War just recently gained a nice update and an expansion announcement, with the Chaos Space Marines.

    Firstly, the update which was released yesterday includes a new Hotseat Mode, that allows you to play on the same computer or send away your saved games to play with others. Quite an interesting way to do it, between turns it will pause and cover the screen (according to what they say) allowing you time to switch. Additionally, it adds in a new neutral Cultist unit, improved notifications, balance updates and a few bug fixes.

  • Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus just had a big update and Heretek expansion announcement

    Now is a good time to take command of The Adeptus Mechanicus once again, as the big Augment Update is out with a ton of new goodies. It's also expanding with the Heretek DLC.

    Firstly, the Augment Update which had a beta up for a few weeks is now live. Should give you a number of reasons to jump back in for another few turns. It includes an IronMan Mode, Difficulty Settings with lots of customization possible, a ton of polish has been done to the explorations, the UI also had some polishing work done, cleaner Fonts and a new Turkish localisation.

  • A look at all the good deals going ahead of the weekend, come find a bargain

    Hello bargain hunters! It's almost the weekend, so let's take a look at some good deals you can find right now so you have something fresh to play.

  • Risk System looks like a shoot 'em up not to be missed, out with Linux support

    I will admit, I almost missed Risk System thinking it's just another retro-looking shoot 'em up but upon closer inspection it actually looks and sounds pretty damn good.

    The trailer they put out for their launch is pretty awesome too (see below). Not just that, it seems the full opening is entirely retro-Anime art with fantastic music too. The production value that's gone into this seems to be a lot higher than your usual shoot 'em up and I don't remember hearing about it before.

  • Dungeons 3 - Famous Last Words, the real "final" DLC is out today and a new free map for everyone

    Do you love being evil? Do you consider yourself a master of dungeons? Well Dungeons 3 is pretty good and the "final" DLC Famous Last Words is out today, with a free patch.

  • Satirical adventure Irony Curtain: From Matryoshka with Love from Artifex Mundi is out

    Artifex Mundi have once again branched out from a lot of their hidden object games, to give us a satirical point and click adventure with Irony Curtain: From Matryoshka with Love.

    The game is set in an alternate reality, so it's not tied to any real history so it's able to play with the setting. Artifex Mundi said it's inspired by the classics, while not requiring you to hunt down pixels. It's also fully voiced in English, with subtitles in Polish and German.

  • Sandbox tycoon-like trading game 'Merchant of the Skies' has a new trailer and a later release date

    Merchant of the Skies from Coldwild Games, seems like it could be an interesting resource management and trading game with you flying around the world in an airship. There's a new trailer and a delay in the release.

  • The Battle Royale game 'Crazy Justice' is apparently still alive, Black Riddles Studio show new footage

    It's had a bit of a history this one, something I've covered a few times due to my own minor obsession with Battle Royale games. My disappointment has been rather high though, as Black Riddles Studio have to be one of the most uncommunicative developers I've come across in some time now.

    As a quick reminder, Crazy Justice had a Fig crowdfunding campaign that was successful at raising over $73K since it ended. Since then they've teased plenty, gone completely silent for weeks and months at a time, released a very broken backer-only beta, went silent again, released an updated and still quite broken beta and now they're apparently back…again.

  • Strangers - Awaken, a magical themed Battle Royale is on Kickstarter and plans Linux support

    I've been chatting to the developer of Strangers - Awaken recently, a new cross-platform Battle Royale game where magic is your weapon and it's now live on Kickstarter. They're promising it to be a fully cross-platform experience which includes Linux, Mac, Windows and mobiles (Consoles too if they hit some stretch goals).

    Interestingly, it's not a fully standard BR experience as it will have character levelling so it's also partly more like an action-RPG with a skill tree, missions and so on. Each match will be around 15 minutes, as you take down enemies and loot them for new items. They say it won't have any pay to win nonsense either, which is good because such a game would be utterly ruined by any hint of a pay to advance system.

Games: Metroidvania “Mable and the Wood”, Benchmarks and More

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Gaming
  • Metroidvania “Mable and the Wood” Launches this Summer; Windows, Linux, Mac, Switch, and Xbox One

    Originally said to be for Windows PC, Linux and Mac, the game is also now confirmed for Nintendo Switch and Xbox One.

  • Over 100 Linux Gaming/Graphics Tests Looking At The Radeon RX 570 vs. GTX 1650

    Complementing the recent comparison of Radeon RX 560/570/580 vs. GeForce GTX 1060/1650/1660 Linux Gaming Performance benchmarks, in this article are 102 Linux graphics tests (mostly games) looking more closely at the performance of the sub-$150 GeForce GTX 1650 and Radeon RX 570 graphics cards.

  • Retro-inspired 2D action RPG 'CrossCode' adds in arena battles, pets you can give rubs and more

    CrossCode is a fantastic game, a retro-inspired 2D action RPG from Radical Fish Games and it's continuing to expand after release with a big update now out.

    One of the biggest additions in this update, is a new arena battle system found in Rhombus Square. So if you especially enjoy the combat in CrossCode, there's now a whole lot more possible.

  • Raise an undead army of chickens in Undead Horde from 10tons, now out and my thoughts

    Do you like being on the evil side? Good news for you then, as a necromancer you will be raising an undead army in Undead Horde, which is now out with Linux support.

  • Magical action game 'Wizard of Legend' adds more end-game content with a Boss Rush mode and more

    Wizard of Legend is a really great game, especially when you play it in local co-op I've had an absolutely blast. Now it's even better once you've finished the main wizard trials.

    The game has been out for a whole year now, so this update is part of the one year anniversary celebration for it. It's done well too, as it was announced back in July last year that it had surpassed 500K copies sold.

    The "Boss Rush Update" went live yesterday and as the name might suggest, a new Boss Rush mode has been added for those who've completed the main Chaos Trials. Additionally, you can also now access the Hard mode if you're up for the challenge. Both of these modes are available from an NPC in the little plaza area.

  • A new and quite interesting Steam Client Beta is out, nice Linux fixes and Vulkan shader downloading

    Valve put out a brand new Steam Client Beta yesterday and it sounds like a pretty good one, with Linux issues getting some more attention.

    Firstly though, they've re-named In-Home Streaming to Steam Remote Play, since the Steam client can now stream games to any other client both inside and outside your home. Additionally, your paired Steam Link devices will now show up in the Remote Play settings and you can remove all paired Steam Link devices.

    The next interesting bit is for Vulkan, as Valve have re-worked their shader system so it's capable of downloading and pre-compiling the whole collection of Vulkan pipelines for games. So we will now see shader data downloads in Steam and pre-compiling will be enabled in a "future Beta build". This is exciting, hopefully when this is fully enabled, it will make Vulkan games super smooth for both native and Steam Play.

Games Leftovers

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Gaming
  • Ironhide Game Studio's real-time strategy game Iron Marines sees day-1 Linux support

    This is fantastic, Iron Marines from Ironhide Game Studio just released today and they decided to get the Linux version ready to go one day-1. Disclosure: Key provided by the developer.

    For those not familiar with the developer, this is the studio behind hits like Kingdom Rush and the various sequels. Their games are usually very stylish and this is certainly no different. Iron Marines is a sci-fi real-time strategy game and it's actually quite a bit different to their usual stuff.

  • My Free Software Activities in April 2019

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

    [...]

    This was a very quiet month compared to pre-freeze time. I reported three security vulnerabilities for Teeworlds (#927152) which were later fixed by Dylan Aïssi. Thank you.

    I also reviewed and sponsored a new revision of OpenMW for Bret Curtis. I’m not sure why he didn’t ask the release team for an unblock but there may be a reason.

  • Valve Pushes Out Big Steam Beta Update, Linux Changes & Steam Remote Play

    Valve issued a new Steam beta release that contains a lot of changes across the board, including Linux.

    This Steam beta update has a number of Steam overlay fixes, Steam In-Home Streaming is now experimentally available "outside of the home" as Steam Remote Play, a variety of Steam Input improvements, a reworked shader system to allow downloading/pre-compiling a whole set of Vulkan pipelines for a given game, and various other fixes.

GeForce GTX 650 vs. GTX 1650 Performance For Linux Gaming, Performance-Per-Watt

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

The latest in our benchmarking with the new GeForce GTX 1650 is some "fun" tests seeing how its performance compares to that of the GeForce GTX 650 Kepler. Various OpenGL and Vulkan Linux gaming tests were carried out as well as some compute tests and throughout monitoring the AC power consumption to yield the performance-per-Watt metrics.

The GeForce GTX 650 Kepler graphics card launched nearly seven years ago already with its 40nm GK107 GPU that provided 384 CUDA cores, 1058MHz core clock speed, and 1GB of GDDR5 video memory. The GTX 650 has a 64 Watt TDP but came with a 6-pin PCIe power connector. The GTX 650 / Kepler is the last generation currently supported by the mainline Linux driver and also the oldest NVIDIA hardware with Vulkan driver coverage, making this comparison particularly interesting.

The GeForce GTX 1650 meanwhile with its 12nm TU117 GPU has 896 CUDA cores, 1485MHz base clock speed, 1665MHz boost clock speed, and 4GB of GDDR5 video memory. The GeForce GTX 1650 has a 75 Watt TDP without the need for any external PCIe power connection.

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Games: SteamWorld, Valve and a Lot More

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Gaming
  • SteamWorld Quest Flips the Switch to Linux, Mac, and PC on May 31

    SteamWorld Quest is coming to new platforms later the month.

  • Counter-Strike: Global Offensive updated again - watch live events, Danger Zone updates and more

    Valve seem to have a renewed focus on Counter-Strike: Global Offensive lately, with a lot of regular updates. This latest one has some fun new toys.

  • Don't Starve: Hamlet expansion has officially left Early Access

    Klei Entertainment have expanded their weird and wonderful survival game with Don't Starve: Hamlet, which has now left Early Access. Sounds like a pretty fun expansion too, as Wilson has discovered a lost town of "aristocratic Pigmen" hiding out in a foreboding tropical jungle

  • Hegemone Pass, a 2D stealth RPG that will support Linux is on Kickstarter

    I like the sound of this alert system, as if you get spotted they don't just chase you, they will actually sound the alarm and end up calling in some reinforcements and any neighbouring enemies will jump in to help them against you. If there's a lot of them, you might end up facing off against an additional wave of enemies.

    Actual combat is turn-based with a timeline to show when someone will be available, although you can mess with this. Some attacks will allow you to push people back which would be handy if you're running low of health.

    They're hoping to get €16K, with the campaign set to end of June 10th. They've had a bit of a slow start, looks like it might struggle a bit as they've not even managed to gather €400 yet.

  • Funny looking abstract puzzle adventure 'Kindergarten' is getting a sequel, out in June

    I totally missed the fact that Kindergarten 2 was actually announced all the way back in 2017. I still haven't played the original but I know a lot of people enjoyed it. It's going to be a bigger game this time too, with a promise of "new ways to get ruthlessly murdered".

    There's going to be plenty of new story missions, new environments, collectible cards and unlockable outfits. The description is amusing too, going over activities you can expect to do like helping the teacher get their fix—oh my.

  • The Swords of Ditto is a much better and more interesting game with Mormo's Curse

    It's had a bit of a rough history, especially on Linux. With the original release, it had problems with invisible walls making it basically impossible to continue. Those issues have been long solved but another problem was that before the forced permadeath made it hard to properly experience it and enjoy it. Now that's no longer forced, you can have a much better time with it and I certainly have.

  • Beautiful action-adventure set inside the human mind, Figment, to expand with Figment: Creed Valley

    Figment: Creed Valley is an "encore" to the original beautiful action-adventure game Figment, one that will continue the story of the original game. When checking out the original Figment back in 2017, I said "Few games catch me completely by surprise with their beauty as well as their gameplay" and I totally stand by that. It's a game I remember very well, it truly left a lasting impression. More of that is going to be awesome, especially with the unique setting deep inside the human mind.

  • While there's no date for the Linux version of Insurgency: Sandstorm, NWI remain committed to do it

    New World Interactive held a Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything) earlier this week for Insurgency: Sandstorm and naturally there was a question about the upcoming Linux version which they answered.

    Originally, they said they were hoping Linux version of Sandstorm would come in the first few updates. Sadly, that didn't happen and we've been left waiting while they improve various aspects of the game. A common complaint seems to be performance, with lots of posts and reviews talking about it needing to be improved.

Games: Valve's Wine-based Proton, Debian-based SteamOS and SteamWorld Quest: Hand of Gilgamech

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Gaming
  • Proton 4.2-4 Released With Fix For RAGE 2, Updated DXVK

    Valve has just released Proton 4.2-4 as their newest downstream of Wine that is used by Steam Play for running Steam Windows games on Linux.

    Proton 4.2-4 pulls in DXVK 1.1.1 as a big update itself. Making Proton 4.2-4 more interesting is a fix for the new RAGE 2 game though for it to run you also need to be using Mesa Git.

  • SteamOS had another beta update recently, new Steam Play Proton version 4.2-4 is out

    Two bits of Valve news to cover tonight: SteamOS gains a new beta version and it looks like Steam Play Proton will be getting an update soon.

    Let's start with SteamOS, Valve's own-brand Linux distribution, mainly aimed at living-room console-style boxes for a large screen experience. It's still going and the 2.190 beta version is now out for those who've chosen to live on the edge with the brewmaster_beta. It's not a big one, with it including mainly security updates and firmware-nonfree updates. Looks like Timothee "TTimo" Besset (formely id Software, helped to port Rocket League to Linux - see my previous interview) is currently keeping it going.

  • SteamWorld Quest releasing end of May on Steam with Linux support

    SteamWorld Quest: Hand of Gilgamech mixes things up, again, as this time it's a roleplaying card game and it's releasing on May 31st. Currently, they've only said it will be on Steam so far.

    SteamWorld Quest originally released first on the Nintendo Switch, where it has gone onto receiving plenty of high praise. This makes me happy, considering I also enjoyed the previous games.

    The press email was very clear on platforms too "Coming soon to Windows, macOS and Linux!", so there's no need to guess with this. Not surprising though, since Image & Form Games have supported Linux nicely with the previous SteamWorld games but it's still great to see it confirmed.

Games: Jupiter Hell, Minecraft on Flathub, Stellaris: Ancient Relics, Mushroom Crusher Extreme

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Gaming

Games: id Software, Mind Your Manas, Light Fairytale, Nelly Cootalot: Spoonbeaks Ahoy! and CorsixTH

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

AMD Releases Firmware Update To Address SEV Vulnerability

A new security vulnerability has been made public over AMD's Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV) having insecure cryptographic implementations. Fortunately, this AMD SEV issue is addressed by a firmware update. CVE-2019-9836 has been made pulic as the AMD Secure Processor / Secure Encrypted Virtualization having an insecure cryptographic implementation. Read more

today's howtos and programming bits

  • How to get the latest Wine on Linux Mint 19
  • How to Install KDE Plasma in Arch Linux (Guide)
  • 0 bytes left

    Around 2003–2004, a friend and I wrote a softsynth that was used in a 64 kB intro. Now, 14 years later, cTrix and Pselodux picked it up and made a really cool 32 kB tune with it! Who would have thought.

  • A month full of learning with Gnome-GSoC

    In this month I was able to work with Libgit2-glib where Albfan mentored me on how to port functions from Libgit2 to Libgit2-glib. Libgit2-glib now has functionality to compare two-buffers. This feature I think can now benefit other projects also which requires diff from buffers, for example Builder for it’s diff-view and gedit.

  • Google Developers Are Looking At Creating A New libc For LLVM

    As part of Google's consolidating their different toolchains around LLVM, they are exploring the possibility of writing a new C library "libc" implementation.  Google is looking to develop a new C standard library within LLVM that will better suit their use-cases and likely others within the community too. 

  • How We Made Conda Faster in 4.7

    We’ve witnessed a lot of community grumbling about Conda’s speed, and we’ve experienced it ourselves. Thanks to a contract from NASA via the SBIR program, we’ve been able to dedicate a lot of time recently to optimizing Conda.  We’d like to take this opportunity to discuss what we did, and what we think is left to do.

  • TensorFlow CPU optimizations in Anaconda

    By Stan Seibert, Anaconda, Inc. & Nathan Greeneltch, Intel Corporation TensorFlow is one of the most commonly used frameworks for large-scale machine learning, especially deep learning (we’ll call it “DL” for short). This popular framework has been increasingly used to solve a variety of complex research, business and social problems. Since 2016, Intel and Google have worked together to optimize TensorFlow for DL training and inference speed performance on CPUs. The Anaconda Distribution has included this CPU-optimized TensorFlow as the default for the past several TensorFlow releases. Performance optimizations for CPUs are provided by both software-layer graph optimizations and hardware-specific code paths. In particular, the software-layer graph optimizations use the Intel Math Kernel Library for Deep Neural Networks (Intel MKL-DNN), an open source performance library for DL applications on Intel architecture. Hardware specific code paths are further accelerated with advanced x86 processor instruction set, specifically, Intel Advanced Vector Extensions 512 (Intel AVX-512) and new instructions found in the Intel Deep Learning Boost (Intel DL Boost) feature on 2nd generation Intel Xeon Scalable processors. Let’s take a closer look at both optimization approaches and how to get these accelerations from Anaconda.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #374 (June 25, 2019)

VIdeo/Audio: Linux in the Ham Shack, How to install OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 and "Debian Package of the Day"

  • LHS Episode #290: Where the Wild Things Are

    Welcome to Episode 290 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short format show, the hosts discuss the recent ARRL Field Day, LIDs getting theirs, vandalism in Oregon, a Canonical flip-flop, satellite reception with SDR and much more. Thank you for tuning in and we hope you have a wonderful week.

  • How to install OpenMandriva Lx 4.0

    In this video, I am going to show how to Install OpenMandriva Lx 4.0.

  • Jonathan Carter: PeerTube and LBRY

    I have many problems with YouTube, who doesn’t these days, right? I’m not going to go into all the nitty gritty of it in this post, but here’s a video from a LBRY advocate that does a good job of summarizing some of the issues by using clips from YouTube creators: I have a channel on YouTube for which I have lots of plans for. I started making videos last year and created 59 episodes for Debian Package of the Day. I’m proud that I got so far because I tend to lose interest in things after I figure out how it works or how to do it. I suppose some people have assumed that my video channel is dead because I haven’t uploaded recently, but I’ve just been really busy and in recent weeks, also a bit tired as a result. Things should pick up again soon.

Games: Steam Summer Sale, Last Moon, Ubuntu-Valve-Canonical Faceoff

  • Steam Summer Sale 2019 is live, here’s what to look out for Linux fans

    Another year, another massive sale is now live on Steam. Let’s take a look at what Valve are doing this year and what you should be looking out for. This time around, Valve aren’t doing any special trading cards. They’re trying something a little different! You will be entering the "Steam Grand Prix" by joining a team (go team Hare!), earning points for rewards and having a shot at winning some free games in the process. Sounds like a good bit of fun, the specific-game challenges are a nice touch.

  • Last Moon, a 2D action-RPG with a gorgeous vibrant style will be coming to Linux next year

    Sköll Studio managed to capture my attention recently, with some early footage of their action-RPG 'Last Moon' popping up in my feed and it looks gorgeous. Taking inspiration from classics like Legend of Zelda: A link to the past, Secret of Mana, Chrono Trigger and a ton more you can see it quite clearly. Last Moon takes in place in a once peaceful kingdom, where an ancient and powerful mage put a curse on the moon, as Lunar Knight you need to stop all this insanity and bring back peace.

  • Ubuntu Takes A U-Turn with 32-Bit Support

    Canonical will continue to support legacy applications and libraries. Canonical, the maker of the world’s most popular Linux-based distribution Ubuntu, has revived support for 32-bit libraries after feedback from WINE, Ubuntu Studio and Steam communities. Last week Canonical announced that its engineering teams decided that Ubuntu should not continue to carry i386 forward as an architecture. “Consequently, i386 will not be included as an architecture for the 19.10 release, and we will shortly begin the process of disabling it for the eoan series across Ubuntu infrastructure,” wrote Will Cooke, Director of Ubuntu Desktop at Canonical.

  • Steam and Ubuntu clash over 32-bit libs

    It has been a tumultuous week for gaming on Linux. Last Tuesday afternoon, Canonical's Steve Langasek announced that 32-bit libs would be frozen (kept as-is, with no new builds or updates) as of this October's interim 19.10 release, codenamed "Eoan Ermine." Langasek was pretty clear that this did not mean abandoning support for running 32-bit applications, however.

  • Linux gamers take note: Steam won’t support the next version of Ubuntu

    Valve has announced that from the next version of Ubuntu (19.10), it will no longer support Steam on Ubuntu, the most popular flavor of Linux, due to the distro dropping support for 32-bit packages, This all kicked off when Canonical, developer of Ubuntu, announced that it was seemingly completely dropping support for 32-bit in Ubuntu 19.10. However, following a major outcry, a further clarification (or indeed, change of heart) came from the firm stating that there will actually be limited support for 32-bit going forward (although updates for 32-bit libraries will no longer be delivered, effectively leaving them in a frozen state).

  • Valve killing Steam Support for some Ubuntu users

    A few years ago the announcement that Steam would begin supporting Linux was a big deal: it meant that anyone who preferred to rock an open-source operating system over Mac OS or Windows 10 would have instant buy-it-and-play-it access to a large catalog of game titles that would have otherwise taken a whole lot of tweaking to get up and running or wouldn't have worked for them at all. For some, at least, the party may be coming to an end.

  • Steam is dropping support for Ubuntu, but not Linux entirely

    The availability of Steam on Linux has been a boom for gaming on the platform, especially with the recent addition of the Steam Play compatibility layer for running Windows-only games. Valve has always recommended that gamers run Ubuntu Linux, the most popular desktop Linux distribution, but that's now changing.

  • Canonical (sort of) backtracks: Ubuntu will continue to support (some) 32-bit software

    A few days after announcing it would effectively drop support for 32-bit software in future versions of the Ubuntu operating system, Canonical has decided to “change our plan and build selected 32-bit i386 packages.” The company’s original decision sparked some backlash when it became clear that some existing apps and games would no longer run on Ubuntu 19.10 if the change were to proceed as planned. Valve, for example, announced it would continue to support older versions of Ubuntu, allowing users to continue running its popular Steam game client. But moving forward, the company said it would be focusing its Steam for Linux efforts on a different GNU/Linux distribution.

  • Just kidding? Ubuntu 32-bit moving forward, no word yet from Valve

    Due in part to the feedback given to the group over the weekend and because of their connections with Valve, Canonical did an about-face today. They’ve suggested that feedback from gamers, Ubuntu Studio, and the WINE community led them to change their plan and will “build selected 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS. Whether this will change Valve’s future with Ubuntu Steam, we’ll see.

  • Canonical backtracks on 32-bit Ubuntu cull, but warns that on your head be it

    CANONICAL HAS CONFIRMED a U-Turn on the controversial decision to drop 32-bit support for Ubuntu users later this year. The company has faced criticism from users who aren't happy with the plan to make Ubuntu purely 64-bit, which culminated at the weekend with Steam announcing it would pull support for Ubuntu. Many Steam games were never made in 64-bit and it would, therefore, devalue the offer. However, Canonical confirmed on Monday that following feedback from the community, it was clear that there is still a demand, and indeed a need for 32-bit binaries, and as such, it will provide "selected" builds for both Ubuntu 19.10 and the forthcoming Ubuntu 20.04. Canonical's announcement spoke of the highly passionate arguments from those who are in favour of maintaining both versions, thus forcing the team to take notice. However, it has made it clear that it's doing so under the weight of expectation, not because it agrees. "There is a real risk to anybody who is running a body of software that gets little testing. The facts are that most 32-bit x86 packages are hardly used at all," the firm said.