Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gaming

Games: Rainbow Six Siege, Stream, GOG, Wine, and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Ubisoft Could Work on 'Rainbow Six Siege' Proton Support If More Linux Users Show Interest - It's FOSS News

    Rainbow Six Siege is a popular multiplayer FPS game that utilizes the BattleEye anti-cheat engine.

    Primarily, it does not support Linux. However, now that anti-cheat engines like BattleEye and Easy Anti-Cheat have added official support for Proton, many Linux users hope to get support for popular multiplayer titles that did not work with Linux.

    Of course, you can always have Windows in dual-boot to play those titles. But, many users use Linux exclusively and cannot play Rainbow Six Siege even if they want to (or have it in their Steam library).

  • Collabora announced Venus, 3D accelerated Vulkan in QEMU | GamingOnLinux

    Well this is quite exciting. Collabora, the open source consulting firm that often works with Valve, has announced the experimental Venus driver for 3D acceleration of Vulkan applications in QEMU. For those not familiar, QEMU is a generic and open source machine emulator and virtualizer.

    "Running graphics applications in a Guest OS can be annoying as they are generally greedy of computing resources, and that can slow you down or give you a bad experience in terms of graphics performance. Being able to accelerate all this by offloading the workload to the hardware can be a great deal. The VirtIO-GPU virtual GPU device comes into play here, allowing a Guest OS to send graphics commands to it through OpenGL or Vulkan. While we are already there with OpenGL, we can not say the same for Vulkan. Well, until now."

  • As GOG struggles, Steam hit a new high of 27M people online

    Recently we had news that DRM-free store GOG has been struggling with losses, and here's Steam continuing to just smash through previous records.

    With the previous all-time high of 26,922,926 users online back in April 2021, on November 28 it yet again broke the record with 27,384,959 according to SteamDB. At the time the record hit, around 7.8 million were actually in-game and while it's of course spread across so many, the winner continues to be Valve's own free to play Counter-Strike: Global Offensive with about 915,791 online playing.

  • Valve reportedly developing a Half-Life shooter-strategy hybrid | GamingOnLinux

    There's been some reports circulating thanks to YouTuber Tyler McVicker (previously known as Valve News Network) that goes into some detail about what Valve is up to. Seems like we might get an RTS/FPS hybrid for the Steam Deck. It seems that Half-Life 3 continues to not be a thing too.

    Sounds like it will be called Citadel, or perhaps Half-Life: Citadel and will be "a co-operative, competitive, asymmetric, third-person, first-person, RTS, FPS, shooter-hybrid thing that takes place in the Half-Life universe" according to McVicker. Matches seem like they will be some sort of battle between NPCs, with you earning things to give to them using a wave-based system for the battling. The video states that Source 2 has been significantly upgraded with a new lighting system, and new NPC systems too. It's a lot to take in and sounds pretty wild.

  • The Elder Scrolls: Arena reimplementation OpenTESArena gets a big upgrade | GamingOnLinux

    While it's currently still in heavy development, OpenTESArena is another great example of what can be done with open source with it reimplementing The Elder Scrolls: Arena in a modern cross-platform game engine. It requires a copy of the original game for the data files, which you can get free officially.

    It's not quite playable — yet, but it is showing massive promise and a new release is out now.

  • How to run Windows software on Linux

    In this article you will learn how to run windows applications on Linux/Ubuntu 18.04 using Wine and other alternatives. Wine ( Wine Is Not an Emulator ), is an open source application which is provided as a compatibility layer in Linux . It is used to bridge the gap between Linux and windows worlds so that applications that are meant for Windows could run on Linux.
    An emulator or a virtual machine would simulate internal Windows logic whereas Wine would transform Windows logic into native UNIX/POSIX compliant logic.

    This is said, not all Windows based applications can run on Linux and even if they do run, their behavior will differ from that in their natural Windows environment. Wine has a database (AppDB) which lists all applications that have been properly tested and confirmed to work on Linux.

Valve Posts Updated Steam Deck FAQs To Address More Community Questions

Filed under
Gaming
Gadgets

Valve has provided an updated developer-focused "frequently asked questions" area stemming from community questions during the recent Steam Deck developer event.

While the Steam Deck shipping date slipped into Q1 due to hardware supply chain issues, Valve continues making great progress on the software front and readying the ecosystem and developer partners for their much anticipated Arch Linux powered gaming handheld console.

Read more

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming
  • Party-based RPG Black Geyser: Couriers of Darkness sees a huge update

    After entering Early Access in August, and then releasing a Linux native version in October, Black Geyser: Couriers of Darkness just got a nice big upgrade for all players.

    "Explore a land plagued by war, pestilence and mysterious abductions, and uncover the hidden legacy of your birth. Recruit powerful allies to your cause; achieve your goals through sorcery, stealth, a silver tongue or brute force; and discover the truth of the Black Geyser.

    Developed by a small indie team and inspired by cRPG classics like Baldur's Gate and Icewind Dale, Black Geyser features challenging real time tactical combat with pause, deep lore and memorable companions, all set in a sprawling, unique fantasy world."

  • Valve puts up official developer FAQ for the Steam Deck | GamingOnLinux

    With the Steamworks Virtual Conference: Steam Deck over now, Valve has put up their own official set of answers to various common questions.

    Plenty of it we've already covered and explained in previous articles like native versus Proton, and expanded details on what we learned from the conference. Still, it's always good to have a few reminders for people that missed it.

  • Developing A Game Engine with Perl | Shawn [blogs.perl.org]

    To most in the know, coding a game engine with Perl would be a surprise. I've certainly been asked, "Why Perl?". You see, unlike C++, C#, Java and others, which are well established languages in game engine design, Perl is not (well) known for it's role in the development of games. Especially not as a game engine language. You are much more likely to see Perl managing the network infrastructure for the gaming industry then you are to see it powering your favourite video games.

  • NordicTrack Patches Out 'God Mode' In Treadmills That Allowed Users To Watch Anything On Its Display

    If you are a console gamer of a certain age, you will remember the bullshit Sony pulled when it patched its PS3 systems to remove useful features it had used as selling points for the console to begin with. Essentially, the PS3 had a feature that allowed you to install another operating system on it. This was used by hobbyists, companies, and the US Military alike to creatively use PS3s for purposes other than that for which they were built, such as research supercomputers and creating homebrew PS3 games. Sony later decided that those features could also be used for piracy or other nefarious actions and so patched it out. Sell the console with a feature, remove it later after the purchase... and then get sued in a class action, as it turned out.

  • GOG to go through some reorganization after suffering losses | GamingOnLinux

    While Steam continues to do well with it being the most popular games store, it seems CD PROJEKT Group's store GOG is really starting to struggle.

    CD PROJEKT recently released their latest financial results, along with a call with investors that went over how the whole business is doing. It's not all bad news for them, since they saw overall 38% more sales revenue compared to the third quarter of last year. On the GOG side though, it posted increasing losses and so it's going to be restructured.

  • GOverlay for editing MangoHud gets a new Steam Deck friendly UI | GamingOnLinux

    GOverlay is an application that helps to manage Linux gaming tools like the MangoHud performance overlay, the Vulkan post-processing layer vkBasalt and the video capture tool ReplaySorcery.

    Over time GOverlay has supported an increasing amount of options, and the UI ended up pretty cluttered and confusing - not to mention it needing a lot of monitor space. GOverlay release 0.7 goes a long way towards fixing that, with a new tabbed interface to spread things out a bit.

  • Ubisoft suggest posting on their forum for Proton support in Rainbow Six Siege | GamingOnLinux

    Now that getting games that use BattlEye for anti-cheat working on Linux (either native or through Proton) is much easier, an Ubisoft rep suggests people post in their forum to show demand for it.

    In response to a post on their official forum asking about Ubisoft hooking it all up, the rep mentioned they can pass the feedback onto developers and that hopefully "other players will reply here in favor of Proton support and the development team may then look to implement it". It's not exactly much and a pretty bog-standard response but it's a reply nonetheless and isn't being ignored.

Games: G-Boy, CrossOver 21.1, and Proton

Filed under
Gaming
  • The Trials And Tribulations Of SLA Printing A Portable Wii Handheld | Hackaday

    The G-Boy kit revolutionized the subculture around building portable home consoles, allowing an entire Wii to be crammed into a form factor the size of a original Game Boy. [Chris Downing] is no stranger to the field, and sourced a G-Boy kit of his own to build it to the best of his abilities. (Video embedded after the break.)

    However, he wanted to step up above the FDM-printed parts of the original kit. Thus, he contacted the kit developer Gman, who provided him with the 3D model files so he could attempt a higher-quality SLA print himself. [Downing] had some experience with SLA printing in the past with the Form 2, but found some unique challenges on this build with the Form 3.

  • Announcing CrossOver 21.1.0

    Hi folks,

    I’m thrilled to announce that we have released CrossOver 21.1 for macOS, Linux and Chrome OS!

    In addition to a suite of fixes for a variety of applications, CrossOver 21.1 also includes some pretty cool enhancements. We’re very excited about them, and we hope you will be too.

    Our big reveal for this release is much-awaited support for Grand Theft Auto V (including GTA Online) on both macOS and Linux. Starting with CrossOver 21.1, you can now run Grand Theft Auto V via either the standalone Rockstar Games Launcher or Steam.

  • CrossOver 21.1 Released With GTA V Support, Restores Outlook 2016 & 365 Support - Phoronix

    CodeWeavers is kicking off the new week by releasing CrossOver 21.1 for Linux, macOS, and Chrome OS users wanting to enjoy Windows games and applications.

    CrossOver 21.1 finally has working Grand Theft Auto V support (GTA Online is working as well) for both Linux and macOS. GTA V could already work with Steam Play's Proton but hadn't worked with CrossOver or upstream Wine. This CrossOver support works both via Steam or the standalone Rockstar Games launcher.

    CrossOver 21.1 also has a number of macOS-specific improvements, including support for macOS 12 "Monterey" and getting more Windows games working nicely on macOS.

  • Ubisoft encourages fans to show interest in 'Rainbow Six Siege' Steam Deck support

    On November 20, a Rainbow Six Siege fan shared a post on the Ubisoft discussion board asking about the possibility of Proton support for the game when the Steam Deck releases, as it runs a Linux-based operating system.

    “Recently, Steam has announced that BattleEye will work with proton on an opt-in basis from game developers,” said Garlic_Kasparov. “R6: Siege is definitely a game I want to play, but unfortunately can’t as I use Linux. This thread is to express concern and voice support for enabling Proton support for R6 Siege as I would love to see it be done.”

    Proton is the compatibility layer that allows Windows games to be run on a Linux device, and as the Steam Deck is Linux-based, Siege and several other games won’t be able to run properly without Proton.

Godot Engine - Multiplayer in Godot 4.0: Scene Replication (part 1)

Filed under
Development
Gaming

It's finally time for the long-awaited post about the new multiplayer replication system that is being developed for Godot 4.0. Below, we will introduce the concepts around which it was designed, the currently implemented prototype, and planned changes to make it more powerful and user-friendly.

Design goals

Making multiplayer games has historically been a complex task, requiring ad-hoc optimizations and game-specific solutions. Still, two main concepts are almost ubiquitous in multiplayer games: some form of messaging, and some form of state replication (synchronization and reconciliation).

While Godot does provide a system for messaging (i.e. RPC), it does not provide a common system for replication.

In this sense, we had quite a few #networking meetings in August 2021 to design a replication API that could be used for the common cases, while being extensible via plugins or custom code.

Read more

Games: Thrive, DLSS, and Proton

Filed under
Gaming

  • Scientific evolution sim Thrive is now available on itch.io and Steam | GamingOnLinux

    Thrive is a free and open source evolution sim, that is now available from the itch.io and Steam stores where you can pay to support the development. It's in Early Access and they have a very long road ahead until it's complete, and they're estimating multiple years to go yet until it's finished.

    "In Thrive, you take control of an organism on an alien planet, beginning with the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). Your goal is to survive in the environment, adapt your species by adding mutations, and thrive. Other species will emerge to compete with yours. They will evolve via a population dynamics driven simulation with random mutations - you must improve and spread your species to surpass them. The success of your species depends both on your skill in surviving as an individual cell and the changes you make in the editor."

  • Linux gaming takes a big step forward with full Nvidia DLSS support in Proton | TechRadar

    The latest version of Proton comes with full support for Nvidia DLSS, among other benefits such as better compatibility with anti-cheat software.

    For the uninitiated, Proton is the compatibility layer which allows Windows games to be played under Valve’s SteamOS operating system, and version 6.3-8 delivers official support for DLSS in DX11 and DX12 games. This follows Nvidia making its frame rate boosting tech available for Vulkan titles earlier in the year (meaning the likes of Doom Eternal got the benefit of DLSS).

  • Linux Release Roundup #21.48: Pinta 1.7.1, Proton 6.3-8, Deepin 20.3, and More Releases - It's FOSS News

    In the Linux Release Roundup series, we summarize the new distribution and application version releases in the past week. This keeps you informed of the latest developments in the Linux world.

    [...]

    Proton compatibility layer 6.3-8 release introduces support for a bunch of new games that include Age of Empires 4, Assassin’s Creed, COD: Black Ops II, and many more.

Games: X4: Tides of Avarice, Devil May Cry 5, Caesar III

Filed under
Gaming
  • X4: Tides of Avarice expansion coming early 2022, plus AMD FSR

    "Encountering and interacting with previously unknown, lawless pirate and scavenger factions, will challenge your perception of social order and justice in the X universe. In new sectors and dangerous regions, you will not only discover new ships and stations, but also encounter stellar phenomena that will significantly influence your plans and actions. What is it all about, and who are the mysterious manipulators that have learned to master a rare and vital resource? Your journey will lead you towards the answers. Set out and discover a new chapter of X4: Foundations."

    Expect to see the likes of a "terrifying pirate battleship with an experimental and unusual energy source" and the complete opposite with an "incredibly lavish and luxurious yacht". Plus you will also get the ability to salvage shipwrecks to recycle resources.

  • Canonical want your feedback on Ubuntu Gaming

    Looks like Canonical, the creator of Ubuntu, want to get in on more Linux Gaming with their Desktop Product Manager starting a new series of blog posts and your feedback is needed.

    The first blog post goes over using Steam and Proton, which won't be news to any of our readers, especially with our full guide existing for some time now. What's interesting though, that I had no idea, is that their Desktop Product Manager is Oliver Smith, who previously worked for Creative Assembly as a Producer on the likes of Alien Isolation - which got ported natively to Linux by Feral Interactive.

    As for the actual guide, it's a pretty good intro for those who need to point newer users to get setup ready with Steam and try out Proton.

  • Creator Day is live on itch.io giving 100% to developers

    The anti-Black Friday event is live once again on the itch.io store, where developers get 100% of purchases as itch forgoes its cut for a day.

    Continuing to buck the trend here, itch always does things a bit differently. They have an open revenue sharing model, where by default itch only takes a 10% cut but developers can set it to whatever they want — even zero.

  • Capcom shows off official video of Devil May Cry 5 on the Steam Deck | GamingOnLinux

    As more developers get their hands on a Steam Deck devkit, we're seeing plenty more show their games and now Capcom has taken a turn with Devil May Cry 5.

    Unlike a lot of what we've seen previously via small clips or plain pictures on Twitter, Capcom went a tiny step further by making a video on their official Capcom USA YouTube Channel - that's quite a bit of extra advertisement power there for the Steam Deck.

  • Open source re-implementation of Caesar III, Augustus v3.1 is out | GamingOnLinux

    Augustus is an open source game engine re-implementation for Caesar III, forked from another called Julius that aims to add in new features.

    Version 3.1 is out now adding in plenty of new goodies like: a volume slider, a Hippodrome betting system, roofed garden walls, palisades for cheaper walls, a new difficulty option to adjust the max number of allowed grand temples per city, new hotkeys, resource stockpiling is now an option to production buildings and warehouses, an option to have number separators for larger numbers and many more improvements and bug fixes. It's making it easily one of the best ways to play the classic city-builder.

GNU/Linux for Games: FUTEX2 and DOSBox

Filed under
Gaming
  • FUTEX2 futex_waitv Wired Up For Other Architectures With Linux 5.16-rc3 - Phoronix

    FUTEX2 as in the new futex_waitv system call landed in Linux 5.16 back during the merge window for improving the efficiency of running Windows games on Linux for those that rely on Windows' WaitForMultipleObjects functionality with futex_waitv is now the ability to wait on multiple futexes. That new system call is now supported on more architectures with the next Linux 5.16 release candidate.

    Back with the original FUTEX2/futex_waitv patches the system call was wired up for x86/x86_64 and Arm. Patches since then enabled the system call for MIPS, s390, parisc,and s390. Landing today was enabling the system call for the rest of the supported CPU architectures by the Linux kernel, not that it's too important for those archs from the gaming aspect but for other use-cases in wanting to wait on multiple futexes.

  • DOSBox Basics on Linux – CubicleNate's Techpad

    DOSBox is an excellent DOS environment that you can enjoy on modern Linux systems. I was never really into DOS all that much in my early computer years. I used it but I didn’t really enjoy it. I much preferred Commodore 64 because it was far more colorful, later the Amiga, because it was far better in sound and graphics and I got my first x86 based system in the Windows 98 years where I only used DOS to do gaming. That said, I do have many happy memories of playing DOS based games like Space Quest, Police Quest, Simant and many others. Games like Descent and Doom have been ported to Linux so there is no benefit in running the DOS version.

    I got the “hankering” to play some old DOS games, specifically Oregon Trail and Sim Ant for some unknown reason, perhaps it was head injury induced, I can’t say for sure. As I was playing with DOSBox, I couldn’t help but think how much I was enjoying the experience and started thinking, “Can I easily integrate these games in my openSUSE Tumbleweed, Plasma Desktop experience?”

Games: Steam Adds GNU/Linux Support for DLSS, Ubuntu Publishes Advice on Steam & Proton

Filed under
Gaming
  • Steam Adds Linux Support for DLSS, 24 More Games | Tom's Hardware

    Valve has updated its Proton solution - the piece of software that's meant to bridge the divide between Windows and Linux gaming -- to version 6.3-8. Following the company's announcement of the Steam Deck handheld gaming device, Valve has been doubling down on its Proton efforts, because the Linux-powered gaming device is going to need a robust game library to compete.

    The new version of Proton brings Linux support to a number of games that were previously locked out of the Linux ecosystem. Crucially, some BattleEye-infused games are now also supported -- the gap between Linux and Windows gaming environments seems to be shrinking even in anti-cheat solutions, whose support is crucial for a device that aims to enable AAA and eSports gaming on the go. Games such as Conan Exiles, DayZ, Planetside 2, and PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds (and others) all require BattleEye suppport.

  • NVIDIA DLSS for DX11 & DX12 Games Now Available on Linux via Proton

    As promised last month, following the initial release of NVIDIA DLSS on Linux via Valve's Proton with compatibility for Vulkan games like DOOM Eternal, Wolfenstein Youngblood, and No Man's Sky, the new version of Proton (6.3.8) released yesterday added NVIDIA DLSS support for DirectX 11 and DirectX 12 games.

    Needless to say, that's by far the largest group of games compatible with NVIDIA's Deep Learning Super Sampling technology out of the over 130 games and apps that support it. For example, out of the most recent DLSS additions, Deathloop, Back 4 Blood, Battlefield 2042, Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy, Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy - The Definitive Edition, Alan Wake Remastered, F.I.S.T.: Forged In Shadow Torch, Bright Memory Infinite, Jurassic World Evolution 2, Chivalry II, The Elder Scrolls Online, Swords of Legends Online, Hot Wheels Unleashed, and Assetto Corsa Competizione are all DX11 and/or DX12 titles. Only Crysis Remastered Trilogy, Rise of the Tomb Raider, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, and Baldur's Gate III support Vulkan.

  • Linux Gaming with Ubuntu Desktop Part 1: Steam & Proton

    The holidays are coming, and if you’re anything like me that means only one thing: The Steam Autumn Sale is live!

    A few years before joining Canonical as the Ubuntu Desktop Product Manager, I was a video game producer (with at least one of my titles getting a native Linux port you’ll be pleased to hear). So improving the gaming experience on Ubuntu is high on my to-do list. With the Linux user base on Steam breaking the 1% ceiling earlier this year- which may or may not be related to the upcoming Linux-based Steam Deck– 2022 is shaping up to be a great year for Linux gaming!

    In the first of a mini-series of blogs, I wanted to break down some of the easiest ways to get started with gaming on Ubuntu. With part 1 we start with the obvious; Steam (and Proton).

Games: Valheim, Godot Engine, and Humble Best of Sandbox Bundle

Filed under
Gaming
  • Valheim gets a new patch, plus teasers for Mistlands and Caves | GamingOnLinux

    Iron Gate are showing off more of what's to come with the next major upgrade for Valheim, along with a small content patch. First up we have patch 0.205.5 which is out now and it includes a new armour set, along with something stirring in the swamps - oh no, it's scary enough.

  • Godot Engine gets AMD FidelityFX Super Resolution | GamingOnLinux

    The free and open source Godot Engine recently had support for AMD FidelityFX Super Resolution merged into the code, ready for the next big release. A wonderful case of open source tech meeting together.

    What is FidelityFX Super Resolution (FSR)? Put simply: a fancy upscaler. FSR allows you to bring down the rendering resolution and have FSR boost it up to a higher resolution, giving you a clear picture. The result is that you should see better performance than simply using the native resolution - something 4K users seem quite happy about.

  • Humble puts up the Best of Sandbox bundle with some good picks | GamingOnLinux

    They might not actually be the "best" but still pretty good. The Humble Best of Sandbox Bundle is live now. This time around is a pretty interesting mix, both with games that have Linux native builds and others that work just fine with the Steam Play Proton compatibility layer.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Hardware/Modding and 3D Printing (RIP, Sanjay Mortimer)

  • Remembering Sanjay Mortimer, Pioneer And Visionary In 3D Printing | Hackaday

    Over the weekend, Sanjay Mortimer passed away. This is a tremendous blow to the many people who he touched directly and indirectly throughout his life. We will remember Sanjay as pioneer, hacker, and beloved spokesperson for the 3D printing community. If you’ve dabbled in 3D printing, you might recall Sanjay as the charismatic director and co-founder of the extrusion company E3D. He was always brimming with enthusiasm to showcase something that he and his company had been developing to push 3D printing further and further. But he was also thoughtful and a friend to many in the community. Let’s talk about some of his footprints.

  • Grafana Weather Dashboard on the reTerminal by Seeed Studio - The DIY Life

    Today we’re going to be taking a look at the reTerminal, by Seeed Studio. We’ll unbox the device to see what is included and we’ll then set up a weather dashboard on it using Grafana. We’re going to use weather data that is being recorded by an ESP32 microcontroller and is being posted to an InfluxDB database. The reTerminal is a compact HMI (human-machine interface) device that is powered by a Raspberry Pi compute module 4 (CM4). It has a 5″ capacitive touch display, along with four physical function buttons, some status LEDs, and a host of IO options.

  • The Medieval History Of Your Favourite Dev Board | Hackaday

    It’s become something of a trope in our community, that the simplest way to bestow a level of automation or smarts to a project is to reach for an Arduino. The genesis of the popular ecosystem of boards and associated bootloader and IDE combination is well known, coming from the work of a team at the Interaction Design Institute Ivrea, in Northern Italy. The name “Arduino” comes from their favourite watering hole, the Bar di Re Arduino, in turn named for Arduin of Ivrea, an early-mediaeval king. As far as we can see the bar no longer exists and has been replaced by a café, which appears on the left in this Google Street View link. The bar named for Arduin of Ivrea is always mentioned as a side note in the Arduino microcontroller story, but for the curious electronics enthusiast it spawns the question: who was Arduin, and why was there a bar named after him in the first place? The short answer is that Arduin was the Margrave of Ivrea, an Italian nobleman who became king of Italy in 1002 and abdicated in 1014. The longer answer requires a bit of background knowledge of European politics around the end of the first millennium, so if you’re ready we’ll take Hackaday into a rare tour of medieval history.

Programming Leftovers

  • Anti-patterns You Should Avoid in Your Code

    Every developer wants to write structured, simply planned, and nicely commented code. There are even a myriad of design patterns that give us clear rules to follow, and a framework to keep in mind. But we can still find anti-patterns in software that was written some time go, or was written too quickly. A harmless basic hack to resolve an issue quickly can set a precedent in your codebase. It can be copied across multiple places and turn into an anti-pattern you need to address.

  • AsmREPL: Wing your way through x86-64 assembly language • The Register

    Ruby developer and internet japester Aaron Patterson has published a REPL for 64-bit x86 assembly language, enabling interactive coding in the lowest-level language of all. REPL stands for "read-evaluate-print loop", and REPLs were first seen in Lisp development environments such as Lisp Machines. They allow incremental development: programmers can write code on the fly, entering expressions or blocks of code, having them evaluated – executed – immediately, and the results printed out. This was viable because of the way Lisp blurred the lines between interpreted and compiled languages; these days, they're a standard feature of most scripting languages. Patterson has previously offered ground-breaking developer productivity enhancements such as an analogue terminal bell and performance-enhancing firmware for the Stack Overflow keyboard. This only has Ctrl, C, and V keys for extra-easy copy-pasting, but Patterson's firmware removes the tedious need to hold control.

  • Wasmer 2.1 WebAssembly Implementation Adds Virtual Filesystem, Lisp + Crystal Support - Phoronix

    Wasmer as "the universal WebAssembly runtime" that focuses on being able to run WASM code on any platform is out with its next major release. Released this summer was Wasmer 2.0 as a step forward for this open-source WASM implementation. The project remains focused on trying to compile "everything" to WebAssembly and to then run that on any operating system / platform or embed it in other languages or run it in a web browser. Wasmer 2.1 was released today as the next major iteration of the platform.

  • What's The Big Deal With Linux Capabilities? | Hacker Noon

    The prevalent perception is that Linux users benefit from and exercise privileges, however this is not the case. It's the process or executable that runs in a certain user context and exercises rights (permission to carry out to perform the privileged operations guarded by Linux kernel).

  • Built with the Rust programming language – LinuxBSDos.com

    Not too long ago, the talk in developer circles seemed to be mainly about Go, Go, Go, Go… I’m referring, of course, to the programming language from Google.  

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 141: Number Divisors and Like Numbers
  • Closures

    A casual remark about closures which I made in My Favorite Warnings: redefine touched off a long off-topic exchange with Aristotle that I thought ought to be promoted to a top-level blog entry. The big thing I learned was that any Perl subroutine can be a closure. The rest of this blog will try to make clear why I now believe this. The words are my own, as are any errors or misconceptions. The second sentence of Wikipedia's definition of a closure says "Operationally, a closure is a record storing a function together with an environment." This makes it sound a lot like an object, and therefore of little additional interest in an O-O environment. But I came to closures pragmatically through Perl, and to me they were a magic way to make data available somewhere else. All I had to do was get a code reference where it needed to be, and any external lexical variables got the values at the time the reference was taken. So much I understood up to the fatal blog post, and it sufficed for my simple needs.

Servers: Kubernetes, Uptime/Availability Ranks, and EdgeX Foundry

  • Kubernetes Blog: Contribution, containers and cricket: the Kubernetes 1.22 release interview

    The Kubernetes release train rolls on, and we look ahead to the release of 1.23 next week. As is our tradition, I'm pleased to bring you a look back at the process that brought us the previous version. The release team for 1.22 was led by Savitha Raghunathan, who was, at the time, a Senior Platform Engineer at MathWorks. I spoke to Savitha on the Kubernetes Podcast from Google, the weekly* show covering the Kubernetes and Cloud Native ecosystem. Our release conversations shine a light on the team that puts together each Kubernetes release. Make sure you subscribe, wherever you get your podcasts so you catch the story of 1.23. And in case you're interested in why the show has been on a hiatus the last few weeks, all will be revealed in the next episode!

  • Most Reliable Hosting Company Sites in November 2021

    Rackspace had the most reliable hosting company site in November 2021, with an average connection time of just 8ms across the month and no failed requests. Rackspace has appeared in the top 10 most reliable hosting company sites every month of the past 12 months, and has taken the number one spot in five of those. Rackspace offers a wide variety of cloud hosting solutions from over 40 data centres across the Americas, Europe, Asia and Australia. [...] Nine of the top 10 hosting company sites used Linux in October, continuing the dominance of Linux. In ninth place, New York Internet (NYI) used FreeBSD.

  • EdgeX Foundry Announces Jakarta, the Project’s First Long Term Support Release - Linux Foundation

    EdgeX Foundry, a Linux Foundation project under the LF Edge project umbrella, today announced the release of version 2.1 of EdgeX, codenamed ‘Jakarta.’ The project’s ninth release, it follows the recent Ireland release, which was the project’s second major release (version 2.0). Jakarta is significant in that it is EdgeX’s first release to offer long term support (LTS).

Debian: Sparky's Annual Server Donations Drive and Latest Debian Development Reports

  • Sparky: Annual donations for our server 2021

    Until January 31, 2022 we have to collect and pay for the server 1500 PLN / 360 Euros / 430 USD plus min. 2800 PLN / ~ 670 Euros / ~ 800 USD for our monthly living and bills, such as: electricity, gas, water, internet, domains, expenses related to improving the functionality of websites, small computer equipment that wears out constantly (memory, pen drives, mice, batteries, etc. …), fuel, as well as rent, food, drugs and immortal taxes. We are starting the fundraising campaign today to make sure we will pay for the server on time, so we could stay online for you another year. It is our passion and work we do all the times, therefore we believe that with your help we will succeed.

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in November 2021

    This month I accepted 564 and rejected 93 packages. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 591.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: FOSS Activites in September 2021

    Here’s my (twenty-fourth) monthly but brief update about the activities I’ve done in the F/L/OSS world.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: FOSS Activites in October 2021

    Here’s my (twenty-fifth) monthly but brief update about the activities I’ve done in the F/L/OSS world.