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Gaming

Games: Loria, Dota Underlords and Steam in China

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Gaming
  • Classic inspired RTS Loria is now available DRM-free on GOG

    If you're like me and you enjoy a good real-time strategy game, Loria is actually pretty good. It added Linux support on Steam earlier this year and now it's also available on GOG.

    While it's inspired by titles like Warcraft II, it's not just a retro RTS. There's a few RPG-like elements including hero units, item collection, quests and more.

  • The Underlords are actually coming to Dota Underlords, plus a new Duos mode

    Valve continue to push out changes rapidly to their auto-battler Dota Underlords, with some of their upcoming plans now being detailed in a fresh update.

    One big new feature planned to be available in a few weeks is a new Duos game mode. Valve say it's a new way to play cooperatively with a friend. You party up and battle against other teams and it will support both Casual and Ranked play.

    The actual Underlords are going to be making an appearance soon too. This feature Valve said they're "excited" about, as they're a "core part of the game". They haven't said how they will work but they will "add a layer of fun and strategy to every match" so I'm very curious to see what happens.

  • Steam for China Is Called 'Zhengpi Pingtai'

    The digital games service will be run almost entirely independent of Steam and by Valve's Chinese partner company Perfect World.

Games: ct.js, Sin Slayers, Path of Titans, Steam and More

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Gaming
  • 2D game editor ct.js goes open source and it's closing in on a new major release

    With an aim to make 2D game development learning fun, ct.js recently went open source to allow anyone to jump in and try it as well as help push it further.

    It's going through a major revamp too, with the first few preview builds available. Since we're covering it, of course this means the editor has Linux support too! As the name of the game engine might suggest, games in ct.js are written in JavaScript.

  • A look over Steam's top releases from July, plus some usual quick thoughts on Linux support

    Valve continue their blog posts highlighting games doing well on the platform, with a look at their top releases on Steam during July now available. Just look with June and May, here's my own little run-down on it.

    As usual, Valve are looking at revenue earned during the first two weeks following the release of a game.

  • Dark fantasy RPG Sin Slayers is getting ready to release soon with Linux support

    Sin Slayers, an RPG with roguelike elements set in a dark fantasy world is getting ready to release with Linux support on September 5th.

  • Dino survival game Path of Titans has been fully funded ready to support Linux

    Path of Titans from Alderon Games has managed to pass the crowdfunding test, with their dino survival game hitting well over their initial goal.

    They had a flexible goal, meaning all funds raised would be sent to them even if the final target wasn't met. Not that it was needed, as they managed to raise $63,920 against the original $24,437 goal.

  • In SKUL, you're a special skeleton that switches heads to gain powers

    SouthPAWGames recently released a demo of their upcoming action-platformer SKUL, it's rather impressive with a pretty unusual cast of characters.

    You play as Skul, a skeleton guard with the power to switch heads with another and gain their power. From what the developer said, eventually you will regain some memories of your past life and eventually face your original death and find out the truth.

  • Rise of Industry is getting a futuristic expansion with 2130 releasing this year

    Dapper Penguin Studios recently announced Rise of Industry: 2130, a futuristic expansion to their sweet strategic tycoon game.

    2130 seems to be taking Rise of Industry in an interesting direction, as it follows players overpulluting the world, creating a nuclear winter killing almost all life on the planet. Since they're not being constrained by history with the original set in 1930, they said for the expansion they're going "crazy with technobabble and future-tech".

  • Steam Play arrived on Linux one year ago, some thoughts

    Tomorrow marks a special occasion, as Steam Play celebrates its first birthday! A good time to reflect on how it’s impacted Linux gaming.

    Steam Play is a feature of the Steam client on Linux that enables you to play Windows games just like you would with any other Linux game. It’s a feature that was long requested by users, with multiple tickets being opened on Valve’s steam-for-linux bug tracker, like this one, all the way back in 2012.

    Announced officially on this day back in 2018, Valve shook the very core of Linux gaming and they’ve certainly made things interesting. What they came up in partnership with the team at CodeWeavers is called Proton—the name given to the software behind Steam Play. It takes Wine with some extra patches and bundles it together with other projects like DXVK. Proton is open source too, available to see on GitHub.

    Linux users have used Wine for many years to run all sorts of games and applications from Windows on Linux. An issue with Wine usage is that developers see you as another Windows user in their statistics. Steam Play does help to solve that issue, as your purchases do count and show up as a Linux sale on Steam.

  • The Iron Oath looks like a great turn-based tactical RPG coming to Linux next year

    After a successful crowdfunding campaign back in 2017, The Iron Oath is progressing well onto a release scheduled for next year.

    This is one covered here on GOL back in August of 2017 when the Kickstarter was running. We never did check back on how The Iron Oath did, so it's pleasing to see Curious Panda Games slashed through the $45,000 goal ending with $94,524! Did you miss it?

Games: Steam Play/Proton, GNU/Linux on Xbox, and UnderMine

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Gaming
  • CodeWeavers Reflects On The Wild Year Since Valve Introduced Steam Play / Proton

    This week marks one year since Valve rolled out their Proton beta for Steam Play to allow Windows games to gracefully run on Linux via this Wine downstream catered for Steam Linux gaming. It's been crazy since then with all of Valve's continued work on open-source graphics drivers, adding the likes of FAudio and D9VK to Proton, continuing to fund DXVK development for faster Direct3D-over-Vulkan, and many other infrastructure improvements and more to allow more Windows games to run on Linux and to do so well and speedy.

  • Turn your Xbox console into a home PC with this guide

    If you’ve ever wondered if you can turn your Xbox into a PC, you came to the right place.

    Because the Xbox console has the same hardware specifications as some older computer desktops, you will be able to convert it to a fully functioning PC. Unfortunately, you will not be able to install Windows on your console, but you can use the Linux operating system.

    In this article you will find out what items you’re going to need in order to make this happen, and also the steps you need to follow to accomplish this.

  • Action-adventure roguelike UnderMine now available in Early Access

    UnderMine from developer Thorium is an action-adventure roguelike with a bit of RPG tossed in, it's now in Early Access with Linux support. [...]

    Featuring some gameplay elements found in the likes of The Binding of Isaac, you proceed further down the UnderMine, going room to room digging for treasure and taking down enemies. There's also some RPG style rogue-lite progression involved too, as you're able to find powerful items and upgrades as you explore to prepare you for further runs.

Games Leftovers

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Gaming
  • Attack of the Clones with custom Proton builds for Steam Play

    I know how you all love to tinker, so how about tinkering away with some custom builds of Steam Play Proton on this fine Tuesday afternoon?

    There's a feature in the Steam client on Linux that enables you to add in your own special builds of Steam Play and other compatibility tools like Boxtron for native DOSBox. A very useful feature, since the community can build on top of work done by Valve to make Linux gaming with Steam Play even better.

    One such custom build of Proton which recently released is Proton-i 4.13-3. This one is quite simple with a few little updates and fixes like moving Proton 4.11-2 patches on top of Wine 4.13, a fix for Unreal Engine 4 and a few other little changes. Likely a good one to try, if you just want to be that little bit more up to date.

  • Mixing Tower Defense with production chains, the free and open source game Mindustry has a big update

    Could this be your next time sink? Mindustry merges together Tower Defense style gameplay with production chains from the likes of Factorio.

    A few days ago, the developer released the final 4.0 build which is an absolutely massive update to Mindustry. It took 88 builds to get there and it was worth the wait. It's an overhaul to all parts of the game including new gamemodes, customizable rules, a new editor, new graphics, new enemies, unit production, new progression, a campaign and more.

  • Wasteland 3 has an impressive new trailer for Gamescom

    inXile Entertainment have shown off more of their upcoming party-based RPG Wasteland 3 at Gamescom and it's looking great.

  • Areia: Pathway to Dawn aims to be a relaxing meditative adventure game

    Areia: Pathway to Dawn from Gilp Studio was just recently announced with the developer promising it to be a "journey like no other".

    It's an adventure game, with a few puzzle elements to it and a wondrous style. The developer said it's a game about emotions and spiritual growth, a tale of wonder as you explore a land inhabited by only one character. It's supposed to be a calming experience, with Gilp Studio saying it's "a unique addition to the range of meditative games".

Games: Underworld Ascendant, Dark Envoy and Elite Dangerous

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Gaming
  • Underworld Ascendant's Linux port has now been released

    Get ready to dungeon crawl! After many delays, the sequel to the classic Ultima Underworld games has finally seen a Linux release.

  • Event Horizon (Tower of Time) show off the first gameplay from their next RPG Dark Envoy

    Ah Gamescom has arrived, which means tons of games will be shown off over the next week. Event Horizon (Tower of Time dev) are getting in on the action, to show off footage from their brand new RPG called Dark Envoy.

    For those who missed the previous article, it is already confirmed to be coming to Linux. To save you a click, when asked they said "We spent a considerable effort to make Tower of Time run well on Linux - so now, being more experienced with it, we also plan to release on Linux at the same time as PC launch.".

  • Going where no Steam Play has gone before with Elite Dangerous

    What’s the one game keeping you a dual booter? Maybe it’s PUBG, or Rainbow Six: Siege? Maybe it used to be Overwatch? For me, that game was Elite Dangerous, and one year on from Proton’s release, I have a story to tell.

    There’s a certain “je ne sais quoi” about Elite Dangerous that I’ve never been able to put my finger on. It’s a game set in a scientifically modelled, full-scale replica of the whole Milky Way galaxy, and as with that setting, the game is truly vast, remarkably cold, and frequently incomprehensible. Yet, when playing Elite, I get the same feeling as when looking up at the stars on a dark and moonless night — my hungry soul is fed. Or it could just be space madness. Regardless, it’s a feeling that I like to dip into every once in a while, immerse myself in, and try not to drown.

Games: Don't Starve Together, Cthulhu Saves the World, EVERSPACE 2 and Stadia

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Gaming
  • Don't Starve Together has a big free update adding in boats and a strange island

    Klei Entertainment have given the gift of new features to their co-op survival game Don't Starve Together, with the Turn of Tides update now available.

    Taking a little inspiration from the Shipwrecked DLC available for the single-player version Don't Starve, this new free update enables you to build a boat to carry you and other survivors across the sea. Turn of Tides is the first part of a larger update chain they're calling Return of Them, so I'm excited to see what else is going to come to DST.

  • Cthulhu Saves the World has an unofficial Linux port available

    In response to an announcement to a sequel to Cthulhu Saves the World, Ethan Lee AKA flibitijibibo has made a unofficial port for the original and a few other previously Windows-only games. As a quick reminder FNA is a reimplementation of the proprietary XNA API created by Micrsosoft and quite a few games were made with that technology. We’ve gotten several ports thanks to FNA over the years though Ethan himself has mostly moved on to other projects like working on FAudio and Steam Play.

  • EVERSPACE 2 announced, with more of a focus on exploration and it will release for Linux

    EVERSPACE is probably one of my absolute favourite space shooters from the last few years, so I'm extremely excited to see EVERSPACE 2 be announced and confirmed for Linux.

    For the Linux confirmation, I reached out on Twitter where the developer replied with "#Linux support scheduled for full release in 2021!".

  • Google reveal more games with the latest Stadia Connect, including Cyberpunk 2077

    Today, Google went back to YouTube to show off an impressive list of games coming to their Stadia game streaming service, which we already know is powered by Debian Linux and Vulkan.

    As a reminder, Google said not to see Stadia as if it was the "Netflix of games", as it's clearly not. Stadia Base requires you to buy all your games as normal, with Stadia Pro ($9.99 monthly) giving you a trickle of free games to access on top of 4K and surround sound support.

Games: Blood: Fresh Supply, Spacebase Startopia, wsPublish, Devader, Planetary Annihilation: TITANS, Warfork, Project 5: Sightseer and GOG

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Gaming
  • The situation with Blood: Fresh Supply getting a Linux version is looking a little unclear

    Blood: Fresh Supply is the revamp of the classic 90's first-person shooter Blood, released by Nightdive Studios in May this year.

    In the most recent update on Steam, the team mentioned "For future issues, we will have to recommend contacting Atari about them.". Their wording is interesting, which seems to indicate that Nightdive will not be making any further additions to Blood: Fresh Supply. Presumably then, this would mean the Linux version they previously confirmed back in May will not be happening either.

  • Spacebase Startopia is the next title from Realmforge and Kalypso Media, coming to Linux

    Set Phasers to fun sci-fi fans, as Realmforge (Dungeons 3) and Kalypso Media just announced Spacebase Startopia and it's confirmed to be supporting Linux.

    From the press release sent over by Kalypso Media, they confirmed it's "an all-new take on the 2001 cult classic" Startopia from Mucky Foot Productions.

  • wsPublish, an open source Steam Workshop Interop Library released

    How about a little open source news to get your Monday flowing? Game porter Ethan Lee recently announced the release of wsPublish, an open source Steam Workshop Interop Library with a little history.

  • Incredibly stylish twin-stick shooter Devader is launching next month

    With some really wild enemy designs and action that just don't stop, Devader is a damn fun game and it's releasing officially next month.

  • Planetary Annihilation: TITANS still seeing updates, Mesa issues on Linux being looked into

    Celebrating one year since Planetary Annihilation Inc took over development of Planetary Annihilation: TITANS from Uber Entertainment, the team have given an update.

    The post goes over what they've been able to achieve and it is quite impressive. Before Planetary Annihilation Inc appeared, it did seem like the game was left on life support so they've given it a big boost. A fair amount of Planetary Annihilation: TITANS was getting old, so their first point of action was to upgrade the underlying tech to be more modern. Along with that they also upgraded the AI, put a fair amount of effort into their servers to improve performance, gave it more multi-threading and so on.

  • Based on the classic FPS Warsow, the new Warfork is now live in Early Access

    Fast-paced arena shooter Warsow has been forked, updated under the name of Warfork and it's now in Early Access on Steam.

    If you're curious why they forked it and put it on Steam, according to the team behind Warfork the owner of Warsow is apparently opposed to a Steam release (see the additional notes below on that). Not just that, but until recently Warsow saw very little in the way of updates and seemed a bit dead overall. In addition, the developers of Warfork are planning lots of work to make Warfork more easily adjusted with mods.

  • Open-world vehicle-based survival game Project 5: Sightseer has been officially released

    Set on a huge procedurally generated world, Project 5: Sightseer from the developer of Windward is a sandbox open-world survival game where you pilot various vehicles.

    Instead of running around as person like in other survival sims, Project 5: Sightseer is more about technology. Starting you off in a rather crap land vehicle, you eventually build up an outpost and research much better transportation including those that enable you to fly vast distances easily.

  • GOG are celebrating their Community Wishlist feature with a big sale

    The DRM-free store GOG are currently doing a bit of patting themselves on the back with a sale celebrating their Community Wishlist feature.

    Allowing gamers to suggest, discuss and vote on games they want to see come to GOG it's a pretty fun feature for a curated store to have. GOG say they have completed "over 2 million wishes" and they have "no plans on slowing down" with it. They of course can't fulfil every wish, but it's a good way for them to see what classics people want revived.

The ClockworkPi GameShell is a super fun DIY spin on portable gaming

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GNU
Linux
Gaming
Gadgets

Portable consoles are hardly new, and thanks to the Switch, they’re basically the most popular gaming devices in the world. But ClockworkPi’s GameShell is something totally unique, and entirely refreshing when it comes to gaming on the go. This clever DIY console kit provides everything you need to assemble your own pocket gaming machine at home, running Linux-based open-source software and using an open-source hardware design that welcomes future customization.

The GameShell is the result of a successful Kickstarter campaign, which began shipping to its backers last year and is now available to buy either direct from the company or from Amazon. The $159.99 ( on sale for $139.99 as of this writing) includes everything you need to build the console, like the ClockworkPi quad-core Cortex A7 motherboard with integrated Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and 1GB of DDR3 RAM — but it comes unassembled.

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Rust will offer refunds as they stop shipping Linux client

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Multiplayer survival game Rust will soon stop shipping its Linux client and offer refunds to those who have played using it. They’ve penned a blog post explaining that it had become a “cheater’s sanctuary,” and that a September update addressing performance and security not being supported on the OS was the final straw, despite believing that supporting Linux is still “the right thing to do.”

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Games: Mutant Year Zero Road To Eden and Unigine 2.9

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

Games: Loria, Dota Underlords and Steam in China

  • Classic inspired RTS Loria is now available DRM-free on GOG

    If you're like me and you enjoy a good real-time strategy game, Loria is actually pretty good. It added Linux support on Steam earlier this year and now it's also available on GOG. While it's inspired by titles like Warcraft II, it's not just a retro RTS. There's a few RPG-like elements including hero units, item collection, quests and more.

  • The Underlords are actually coming to Dota Underlords, plus a new Duos mode

    Valve continue to push out changes rapidly to their auto-battler Dota Underlords, with some of their upcoming plans now being detailed in a fresh update. One big new feature planned to be available in a few weeks is a new Duos game mode. Valve say it's a new way to play cooperatively with a friend. You party up and battle against other teams and it will support both Casual and Ranked play. The actual Underlords are going to be making an appearance soon too. This feature Valve said they're "excited" about, as they're a "core part of the game". They haven't said how they will work but they will "add a layer of fun and strategy to every match" so I'm very curious to see what happens.

  • Steam for China Is Called 'Zhengpi Pingtai'

    The digital games service will be run almost entirely independent of Steam and by Valve's Chinese partner company Perfect World.

Samsung Galaxy Note 10 now links up with Windows and Mac PCs via supercharged DeX app

And there’s a big bonus here in the form of being able to drag-and-drop files directly from your phone to your PC, and vice versa. So you could take a photo from your Note 10 and whip it onto the PC to tweak it up in a proper heavyweight image editor, for example. Furthermore, as XDA Developers observes, Linux on DeX is available via the DeX app, allowing you to create a container and run an Ubuntu Linux image, giving you even more flexibility and options here. It’s not clear what Samsung intends to do in terms of giving users with older Galaxy handsets backwards compatibility, but at the moment, this is strictly a Galaxy Note 10-only affair, as mentioned. Finally, it’s worth noting that the app does warn that your phone might get hot running the DeX application, although exactly how hot likely depends on what you’ve got the hardware doing, of course. Read more

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Open Policy Agent: Cloud-native security and compliance

    Every product or service has a unique way of handling policy and authorization: who-can-do-what and what-can-do-what. In the cloud-native world, authorization and policy are more complex than ever before. As the cloud-native ecosystem evolves, there’s a growing need for DevOps and DevSecOps teams to identify and address security and compliance issues earlier in development and deployment cycles. Businesses need to release software on the order of minutes (instead of months). For this to happen, those security and compliance policies—which in the past were written in PDFs or email—need to be checked and enforced by machines. That way, every few minutes when software goes out the door, it’s obeying all of the necessary policies. This problem was at the top of our minds when Teemu Koponen, Torin Sandall, and I founded the Open Policy Agent project (OPA) as a practical solution for the critical security and policy challenges of the cloud-native ecosystem. As the list of OPA’s successful integrations grows—thanks to active involvement by the open source community—the time is right to re-introduce OPA and offer a look at how it addresses business and policy pain points in varied contexts.

  • Eirini: Mapping Code into Containers

    There has been a lot of noise recently about the Project known as Eirini.  I wanted to dig into what this project was in a little more detail. If you weren’t already aware, its goal is to allow Cloud Foundry to use any scheduler but it’s really for allowing the workloads to run directly inside Kubernetes without needing separately scheduled Diego cells to run on top of. There are many reason that this is a fantastic change, but the first and foremost is that having a scheduler run inside another scheduler is begging for headaches. It works, but there are odd edge cases that lead to split-brain decisions. NOTE: There is another project (Quarks) that is working on containerizing the control plane in a way that the entire platform is more portable and requiring significantly less overhead. (As in: you can run Kubernetes, the entire platform, and some work, all on your laptop)  

  • Wayland Buddies | LINUX Unplugged 315

    We spend our weekend with Wayland, discover new apps to try, tricks to share, and dig into the state of the project. Plus System76's new software release, and Fedora's big decision.

  • Kdenlive 19.08 Released with Clip Speed, Project Bin Improvements

    Busy trying to salvage footage from a recent video shoot, I missed the arrival of Kdenlive 19.08, the first major release of this free video editor since its big code revamp earlier this year. And what a release it is! Kdenlive 19.08 builds on the terrific work featured in the various point releases that have been available since April. “This version comes with a big amount of fixes and nifty new features which will lay the groundwork for the 3 point editing system planned for this cycle,” they say in their release announcement. Now, 3-point editing isn’t my bag (if you’re a heavy keyboard user, you might want to look into it) so I’m gonna skip that side of things to highlight a couple of other welcome changes to the project bin.

  • LabPlot's Welcome screen and Dataset feature in the finish line

    Hello Everyone! This year's GSoC is coming to its end. Therefore I think that I should let you know what's been done since my last blog post. I would also like to evaluate the progress I managed to make and the goals set up at the beginning of this project. As I told you in my last post, my main goal, in this last period, was to clean up, properly document, refactor, optimise the code and make it easier to read, so it would be fit to be brought to the master branch and to be used by the community. My next proposition was to search for bugs and fix them, in order to make the implemented features more or less flawless. I can happily state, that I succeeded in this.

  • Distributed Beta Testing Platforms

    Do they exist? Especially as free software? I don’t actually know, but I’ve never seen a free software project use something like what I’ve got in mind. That would be: a website where we could add any number of test scenarios. People who wanted to help would get an account, make a profile with their hardware and OS listed. And then a couple of weeks before we make a release, we’d release a beta, and the beta testers would login and get randomly one of the test scenarios to test and report on. We’d match the tests to OS and hardware, and for some tests, probably try to get the test executed by multiple testers. Frequent participation would lead to badges or something playful like that, they would be able to browse tests, add comments and interact — and we, as developers, we’d get feedback. So many tests executed, so many reported failure or regressions, and we’d be able to improve before the release.

  • GSoC 2019 Final submission

    Since my last blog post the main merge request of my GSoC project has landed and after that I followed up with subsequent bugfixes and also a couple of enhancements to the savestates manager.

  • LXLE 18.04.3 Beta Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at LXLE 18.04.3 Beta.

  • Fedora Update Weeks 31–32

    The branch point also meant that the Change Code Complete deadline was passed. As part of the Go SIG, I was one of the packagers behind the Adopt new Go Packaging Guidelines Change. As mentioned in the last post, this was mostly handled by @eclipseo and the tracker bug was marked complete for it just earlier. I am also behind the Automatic R runtime dependencies Change. As part of this Change, I initiated a mini-rebuild last week of all affected R packages. I will write about that in a separate post. That tracker bug is now Code Complete, though there are a couple FTBFS to fix up. With release monitoring working again, that meant a slew of new bug reports about new package versions being available. This happened just last Friday, so I haven’t had much chance to update everything. I did manage to go through almost all the R packages, except for a few with new dependencies. I also updated one or two Go and Python packages as well.

  • Rugged, Kaby Lake-U based IoT gateway offers Linux BSP

    Axiomtek’s Linux-ready, DIN-rail mounted “ICO500-518” IoT gateway runs on 7th Gen Core U-series CPUs and provides swappable SATA, 4x USB 3.0, 2x GbE, 2x mini-PCIe, and 2x “PIM” slots for options including 8x GbE or isolated serial and CANBus. Axiomtek announced a compact modular edge gateway with ruggedization features for industrial IoT. Applications for the Intel 7th Gen Kaby Lake-U based ICO500-518 include transportation, public utility, smart building, solar energy, and factory automation.

  • 5 Reasons to Use a VM for Development [Ed: Dice promoting the idea that developers should use Windows and keep GNU/Linux in a VM jail using Microsoft's proprietary tools]

    I started using virtual machines (VMs) on my development PC about six years ago; I was keen to learn Linux, having been a Windows developer since the mid-1990s. At first, I used an old Windows PC and installed a Linux distro on it; but I quickly found out that the distro took up a lot of space, and I needed a KVM switch to manage two different PCs. It was all a bit “fiddly,” which is why I began exploring the potential of VMs. Discovering VirtualBox was a godsend, and made things a lot more convenient. Despite all the flak Oracle gets over its databases, MySQL, and Java, Virtual Box remains an excellent and free open-source package.