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Gaming

Games: Escape Simulator, Steam Digital Tabletop Fest RPG Edition, and More

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Gaming
  • Get out together, go it alone or make your own rooms in Escape Simulator out now | GamingOnLinux

    Up for a challenge and love to problem solve? Team up with a friend in co-op or do it alone in Escape Simulator out now. Developed by Pine Studio, the same team that created Faraway: Puzzle Escape and SEUM: Speedrunners from Hell.

    Escape Simulator is a first-person escape room experience - designed with input from real-life escape room operators. Playing solo or via online co-op, players must puzzle their way through a quirky collection of interactive escape rooms, putting their wits (and teamwork) to the test.

  • Steam Digital Tabletop Fest RPG Edition is live with many discounts | GamingOnLinux

    Another big Steam event is underway with the Steam Digital Tabletop Fest RPG Edition. A chance for you to pick up some cheap games and more.

  • Space Crew: Legendary Edition is out now free for existing owners | GamingOnLinux

    Space Crew, the sequel to the very popular Bomber Crew from Runner Duck and publisher Curve Digital, gets renamed to Space Crew: Legendary Edition with a free expansion upgrade out now.

    Bringing with it a fair amount of fresh content, it sounds like a good time to go out and explore space. New dangers lurk in the dark corners though.

  • Paradox announced the Hearts of Iron IV: No Step Back expansion releases November 23 | GamingOnLinux

    Paradox sure are busy with recent announcements including the Stellaris: Aquatics Species Pack, Europa Universalis IV: Origins and now Hearts of Iron IV: No Step Back which releases November 23.

    "With new alternate history paths and game systems, this eagerly awaited add-on presents new challenges for fans of Paradox Interactive's best-selling grand strategy wargame. The centrepiece of No Step Back is a series of new National Focus Trees, giving players many new ways to imagine the course of World War II in Eastern Europe. Major nations have been entirely reworked to offer unique challenges and original histories."

Games: RPCS3, Helms of Fury, Himno - The Silent Melody

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Gaming
  • PS3 emulator RPCS3 can now boot all games released for the console | GamingOnLinux

    An incredible milestone for RPCS3, the free and open source cross-platform PlayStation 3 emulator as their compatibility list has hit the ability to boot all known games.

  • Helms of Fury is an action rogue-lite with a focus on collecting abilities and fast combat | GamingOnLinux

    After a new fast-paced action dungeon crawler? Helms of Fury built with Godot Engine looks like a lot of fun and worth keeping an eye on. The developer has just put up a Kickstarter campaign with plans to offer native Linux support. They're hoping to raise CA$15,000 by November 20 with a release planned for 2023.

    Designed to offer plenty of freedom with the ability to create some insanely powerful character builds, there's a lot to love about the design. Mixing together tons of items to collect across different rarities, with a system that allows you to power up further using a mixtures of attunements and runes to buff you up.

  • Atmospheric rogue-lite RPG Himno - The Silent Melody is now in Early Access | GamingOnLinux

    Developer David Moralejo Sánchez has taken the popular mechanics from the first peaceful Himno, and adapted them into a much bigger game in Himno - The Silent Melody. This time around it's not a peaceful experience, there's dangers lurking in the dark.

    "You play as Fash, an intrepid Guardian Explorer who has seen this world fall. Now after hundreds of years, Fash must bring together the other guardians and restore that world of light and color.

Games: Total War: WARHAMMER III, Sacred Fire, Kulebra and the Souls of Limbo, Space Chef, Europa Universalis IV

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Gaming

Games: Trine 3 on Linux, Stellaris: Aquatics Species Pack, Cassette Beasts, Julius 1.7

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Gaming
  • How to play Trine 3 on Linux

    Trine 3 is an action/puzzle-platformer video game developed by Frozenbyte. It is the successor to Trine 2 and was released on August 20th, 2015. The game is on Microsoft Windows, Xbox, PS4, Mac OS, and Linux. Here’s how to get it working on your Linux PC.

    [...]

    Trine 3 works on Linux as a native game, but you’ll have to install the Steam application first if you want to play it. Thankfully, Steam works on a majority of Linux operating systems. Unfortunately, the software doesn’t come pre-installed on many distributions, so we’ll need to go over how to get it working first.

  • Stellaris: Aquatics Species Pack announced, launching with the free 3.2 update | GamingOnLinux

    Paradox only recently talked about a bunch of changes coming in the free 3.2 update and now they've announced Stellaris: Aquatics Species Pack as the latest DLC.

    "Sail the intergalactic seas and uncover an all new expansion packed to the gills with new options for new and longtime players alike. The Aquatics Species Pack will rinse Stellaris with a rising tide of new content, including brand new origins, species traits, civics and a treasure trove of new cosmetics. Seafarers and landlubbers alike will agree that this is Stellaris’ most immersive species pack to date.

  • Monster collecting game Cassette Beasts gets a new trailer and publisher | GamingOnLinux

    Cassette Beasts is the upcoming monster collecting game from Bytten Studio and today it has been announced that Raw Fury has joined as publisher. Bytten Studio had been looking for a publisher for some time now so this is great news.

    Developed in the open source Godot Engine, Cassette Beasts looks like a monster catching game like no other as you use the powerful fusion system to transform into creatures using retro cassette tapes.

  • Julius 1.7 is out, an open source re-implementation of the classic Caesar III | GamingOnLinux

    Julius is another shining example of an open source game engine re-implementation done well and a major update is out. Taking the original Caesar III and upgrading it for modern computing platforms. Not by the original developers though, this is like others, totally unofficial but don't let that stop you enjoying a much improved experience.

Release candidate: Godot 3.4 RC 1

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Development
Gaming

The upcoming Godot 3.4 release will provide a number of new features which have been backported from the 4.0 development branch (see our release policy for details on the various Godot versions). With this first Release Candidate, we completely freezes feature development, and comes after a long series of beta builds to fix a number of bugs reported against previous builds (as well as against previous stable branches).

If you already reviewed the changelog for beta 6, you can skip right to the differences between beta 6 and RC 1. Notable changes are in-editor class reference translations (so far Chinese (Simplified), Spanish, and some French), some new rendering features (high quality glow mode, 3D point light attenuation option), and a number of C# marshalling fixes.

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Games: Half-Life 2, Counter-Strike (CS), and Much More

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Gaming
  • Half-Life 2 and the episodes get a Beta with Vulkan (DXVK) and more | GamingOnLinux

    Valve has put up a Beta for Half-Life 2, Half-Life 2: Episode One and Half-Life 2: Episode Two as they prepare more of their own games ready for the Steam Deck.

    We don't know yet all the exact details, as this update hasn't even been announced by Valve yet but the Betas are up and you can try them out right now. However, we do know for sure they now have DXVK Native which is the port of DXVK to Linux which allows it to be used natively without Wine. This changes the game to use Vulkan, instead of OpenGL, if you launch it with "-vulkan" in the launch options.

  • How to Install Counter-Strike on Ubuntu

    Linux distributions have been gaining massive popularity over the years, becoming more and more suited for daily tasks. Improvements in design and GUI and embedded compatibility with a wide variety of apps have made Linux suitable for casual users.

    Aside from daily work-related tasks, Linux distributions are now optimized for gaming, offering support for many popular gaming titles available on Steam. One of the most popular gaming titles on Steam is Counter-Strike (CS), a collection of multiplayer first-person shooters.

    The gameplay follows standard Search-and-Destroy rules. The Terrorists are tasked with perpetrating acts of terror such as bombing and taking hostages(depending on game mode), whereas the Counterterrorist try to stop the terrorists, either by defusing the bomb, rescuing hostages or by eliminating all terrorists.

  • Intruder In Antiquonia is an upcoming point & click mystery where you unravel your past | GamingOnLinux

    The first game from indie developers Aruma Studios, a husband and wife duo from Spain that follows the protagonist Sarah trying to figure out her past.

    The story takes place in the present day, when Sarah is found lying in the road leading to the town of Antiquonia. After recovering, she is diagnosed with amnesia and must stay in the town to learn about her past. She will soon discover that the internet is not welcome in this town, a detail that will prove difficult as she begins to unravel the mystery of her past.

  • Project Haven looks like a very slick turn-based tactics delight due in 2022 | GamingOnLinux

    Code Three Fifty One are currently working on Project Haven, an impressive looking turn-based tactics game where you command the Steel Dragons, a mercenary outfit fighting for survival in the harsh, urban near-future that is Haven City. Seems to be one we missed during Gamescom this year as we had no idea they planned Linux support at the time.

  • Proton Experimental sees another small update fixing up Fallout 76, updating VKD3D-Proton | GamingOnLinux

    Proton Experimental continues to see rapid development to give us more great fixes to run Windows games under Linux. If you wish to know more about Steam Play and Proton do check out our dedicated section.

    Valve updated it once again on October 18 to bring more improvements. Hot on the heels of VKD3D-Proton version 2.5 releasing, which came with plenty of DirectX Raytracing upgrades, this version is now included in Proton Experimental making it real easy to test it out.

    Other improvements in this release include fixing the Atomic Shop and random crashes in Fallout 76, multiplayer is fixed for RaceRoom, flickering in the Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord launcher was fixed and the Windows version of Game Dev Tycoon is noted as being playable (it has a Linux version too).

  • Steam Deck Verified: Understanding Compatibility - Boiling Steam

    As the launch window of the Steam Deck approaches, Valve has finally decided to touch upon the hot topic of compatibility with the Steam Deck Verified initiative. Basically, they will show in the new SteamOS interface whether or not titles work as expected on the Steam Deck, using a rating system.

  • Valve is Reviewing Games Compatible with SteamOS - It's FOSS News

    With the introduction of Steam Deck, the future of gaming in Linux is more promising than ever.

    The presence of Steam Deck has already made it possible to bring in anti-cheat engine support to Linux. If you did not know, Steam Deck is powered by the upcoming new SteamOS (based on Arch Linux).

    And, now, to make things better, Valve has announced to introduce new compatibility badges to showcase games on Steam that should work with Steam Deck powered by SteamOS.

  • Steampunk base-building survival game Volcanoids gets Steam Workshop support | GamingOnLinux

    Volcanoids is such a fantastic idea for a survival game. You build a base inside a big moving drill, that you continually upgrade and extend and now you can enhance it in many new ways with Steam Workshop support.

    Not played it before? Volcanoids sets you up on an island that sees frequent volcanic eruptions, which are being triggered by strange mechanical bots. It's up to you to build, defend and explore while keeping an eye on the volcano for when you need to quickly dive deep underground in your big drillship.

  • Stellaris to get more free improvements in the upcoming 3.2 update | GamingOnLinux

    Paradox continues to tweak their space sci-fi strategy game Stellaris with another free upgrade coming. Update 3.2 continues the work of their newer Custodian Team. This is the team that focuses entirely on free content, with other teams working on DLC.

    For the 3.2 update (that has no date yet) there's going to be new content and features, some of which was cut from the 3.1 update. While there's no date, they are aiming for around three months between free updates now.

  • The Sundew is a story-rich point & click set in the aftermath of a devastating future war | GamingOnLinux

    After your next futuristic point and click adventure? Check out The Sundew which is out now along with native Linux support.

Games: Valve, Timberborn, and More

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Gaming
  • Valve launches Deck Verified, to show off what games will work well on the Steam Deck | GamingOnLinux

    We've been wondering what Valve had planned to show off Steam Deck compatibility for games and now they've launched Deck Verified as their answer.

    Valve say they are reviewing the entire Steam catalogue on the Steam Deck, with each of them gaining a category that it falls under that will show up across Steam from the store to your own Steam Library. The ratings will be split across Verified, Playable, Unsupported and Unknown. This is good because there's a lot of reasons why games will mix between perfect and unplayable on Steam Deck and the Arch Linux-based SteamOS it ships with.

  • Valve Launches "Steam Deck Verified" Program For Games That Run Well On The Steam Deck - Phoronix

    Valve is introducing a Steam Deck Verified system for helping gamers find out what games have been verified to work well on their forthcoming AMD+Linux-powered handheld game console.

  • VKD3D-Proton 2.5 Released With Experimental DXR 1.1, More Games Working - Phoronix

    VKD3D-Proton as Valve's Direct3D 12 over Vulkan implementation for Steam Play's Proton is out with a big feature update.

    VKD3D-Proton 2.5 brings experimental, opt-in support for DXR 1.1 ray-tracing. DXR 1.1 isn't yet fully implemented but does add inline ray-tracing support and other features. DXR 1.0 ray-tracing meanwhile is now considered effectively feature complete with VKD3D-Proton 2.5.

  • VKD3D-Proton v2.5 is out for Direct3D 12 on top of Vulkan, improving DirectX Raytracing | GamingOnLinux

    VKD3D-Proton is the project that translates Microsoft's Direct3D 12 to Vulkan, another big part of Steam Play Proton and there's a new release out. If you wish to know more about Steam Play and Proton do check out our dedicated section.

    A continued focus of VKD3D-Proton is bringing up support for DirectX Raytracing (DXR). As of this version 2.5 the developer notes that DXR 1.0 "is more or less feature complete". A few weird issues are left and eventually the config variable to enable it will be removed when it's stable enough.

    Further work went into improving DXR 1.1 and it's now experimentally exposed, with it being enabled by setting VKD3D_CONFIG=dxr11. They say that DXR 1.1 cannot be "fully implemented" just yet, although the feature support missing doesn't seem to currently be used by games. As of now DXR 1.1 inline raytracing is also fully implemented.

  • Timberborn: a cute beaver colony sim with an unrewarding late game

    The game only supports Windows. However, it runs excellently on Linux in Steam Proton compatibility mode.

  • Swarming RTS Age of Darkness: Final Stand is in Early Access and works great on Linux | GamingOnLinux

    Age of Darkness: Final Stand is like a fantasy version of They Are Billions, and compared with the latter it runs great on Linux thanks to Steam Play Proton. No native Linux version here but honestly it runs so well you can't tell the difference, it's click and play thanks to Proton and as such a massive fan of real-time strategy games I couldn't resist playing this one myself. Note: key provided by Team17.

    The world in Age of Darkness is one of constant fear. Darkness brings out Nightmares, strange hellish creatures with a taste for flesh and destruction. It's a constant battle of preparation. Right now it only has a survival mode, which sees you build up a village as you attempt to survive each night. All the traditional elements of a base-building RTS are here with population management, resource gathering, army building and more. A game very much for those of you who like "turtling", where you focus on building up a heavy defence.

  • Playing Deltarune: Chapter 2 natively on Linux | GamingOnLinux

    So, some time ago Toby Fox released the second chapter of the Deltarune series. Sadly, as was the case with the previous chapter, this one too comes without official Linux support. However, if the [HeartShapedObject] is willing, there is a way to play the game natively on Linux, albeit without official support.

    The trick is essentially the same as I described back in 2018 when the first chapter of Deltarune was released. Essentially, Deltarune is made with the GameMaker engine, and you can do a "port" of games like that as long as you can find a compatible GameMaker runner binary to pair up with the game data.

  • War Thunder is getting more terrain deformation in the upcoming 'Ground Breaking' upgrade | GamingOnLinux

    Ground Breaking is the name of the next major update for War Thunder and it sounds quite exciting, with some game engine upgrades to allow for more terrain interactions and deformation.

    Not only will you see huge craters left over from some of the more explosive ordinance, you will also be able to push around the ground. Soil, sand and snow will be movable with your tanks, allowing you with a little patience to create your own little protective barriers. That's right, self-entrenching is going to be a thing. In the Ground Breaking update the developers will add in a new animation for vehicles digging in.

  • Hugely popular mobile roguelike Shattered Pixel Dungeon is coming to Steam | GamingOnLinux

    For the PC release the developer now has a Steam page live and they've confirmed it will have a native Linux version.

Games: Steam Play, Dota 2, and Free/Libre OpenTTD 12.0

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Gaming
  • Steam Play tool Luxtorpeda for running games in native Linux engines sees a major upgrade | GamingOnLinux

    Steam Play allows Linux gamers to use many different compatibility layers like Proton for running Windows games but Luxtorpeda instead makes games use an available native Linux game engine. It's a thoroughly clever and awesome project, as there's a number of games that just run better (regardless of the platform) on an up to date native game engine.

    Quite a few games are supported with it including: Arx Fatalis, Caesar 3, Chris Sawyer's Locomotion, multiple Doom games, Descent 1 / 2, Freespace 2, Ocean's Heart, PowerSlave, The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind, Warzone 2100 and the list goes on.

    The new version 40 that's out now moves over to a more modern Steam Runtime (Soldier). The developer mentions that this "leads to better tooling with the newer starting point, less extra dependencies, and will be much more future proof".

  • Marci from the DOTA: Dragon's Blood anime will join Dota 2 later this year | GamingOnLinux

    Valve has announced that the next hero joining the ranks in Dota 2 will be Marci, the silent companion to Mirana from the DOTA: Dragon's Blood anime. It's not a big surprise as Marci ended up being quite the fan favourite.

    Not much is known about the Marci update, as the official post from Valve was short and to the point simple confirming Marci is coming along with an animation by Studio Mir. The only other thing we actually know is that Marci will drop into Dota 2 "this Fall".

  • OpenTTD 12.0 is out now improving multiplayer for fans of Transport Tycoon Deluxe | GamingOnLinux

    Based on Transport Tycoon Deluxe, the free and open source OpenTTD has release version 12.0 as the multiplayer update.

    The big thing with this new release is improved multiplayer and it's much less of a hassle to setup. You no longer need to mess with port-forwarding. The game now does pretty much everything for you. All you need to do now is setup a server, share a code and your friends can join in - nice.

Games Leftovers

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Gaming
  • Call of Duty Warzone: Why Ricochet Anti-Cheat Has Fans Worried [Ed: Linux rootkits]

    Why is Kernel Level Anti-Cheat Software a Security Concern?

    Well, to be clear, it might be more accurate to say that kernel-level anti-cheat software is a potential security concern. Anytime you grant any outside element that level of access to something that’s important to you, you’re potentially exposing yourself to an increased level of risk. However, it doesn’t mean that you’re absolutely going to have a security problem.

  • An Interview With GDKChan, Creator of Ryujinx

    I’m blown away by how far Nintendo Switch emulation has come in just the past few years. To me, it’s just as mind-blowing as when Valve rolled their first Proton release to the public. Linux gamers can not only play most of their favorite Windows games through Proton, but they can also play their favorite Switch games with higher frame rates and resolutions, thanks to emulation. In both cases, the experience is nearly flawless, thanks to Valve/CodeWeaver’s contributions to Wine, and the (mostly) voluntary, rigorous work programmers put in to their emulation projects to ensure a smooth, painless experience.

    I enjoy the Ryujinx emulator in particular, so I wanted to sit down and chat with gdkchan, the primary heart and soul behind the project (not to discredit the several other developers who are working on this as well). gdkchan went above and beyond providing the basic answer behind both ekianjo’s questions and my own.

  • Gaming the System: Economic incentives are preventing desperately-needed game archiving

    For many years now, there has been an ongoing debate about the artistic merit of video games. As a form of media, should they be held in the same regard as movies, TV and music? In terms of archiving, at least, video games lag far behind these counterparts.

    Video games hit store shelves as soon as the technology for playing them began to be invented, and as a result, the hardware was constantly evolving. The Nintendo Entertainment System came out in the 1980s, with games loaded onto chips inside big plastic cartridges. Graphics became more advanced and cartridges grew smaller until, eventually, games moved to disc formats, with developers releasing a new console every few years to keep up.

  • The paradox of open: How to build a better internet

    In an era when content rules, the impulse to expand access to creative works is an idea whose time has been around for at least 20 years. It is hard to even imagine today’s maker culture of re-mix and re-use in a proprietary world dominated by copyright.

    Early on in 2001, when the Creative Commons (CC/cc) organisation was founded by Lawrence Lessig as a United States-based charity to legally adopt creative licences across jurisdictions, it was a measure of reform to copyright legislation intended to build a healthy digital commons.

How I use open source to play RPGs

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OSS
Gaming

I play a lot of tabletop role-playing games (RPGs), in terms of both frequency and variety. Generally, I prefer playing RPGs in person with friends, but over the past two years, I've been playing online.

At first, I wasn't sure how to run a long-term game online. I knew there were a lot of tools out there to make it possible, but none of them interested me until I discovered the world of open source online tabletop gaming. With a small collection of open source applications, I've been able to run all my games exclusively on open source.

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