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Games: HITMAN, Sauerbraten, and More

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Gaming
  • HITMAN 3 arrives on Steam and works flawlessly on Linux with Proton | GamingOnLinux

    Good news for the Steam Deck. IO Interactive have finally put HITMAN 3 on Steam, after the Epic exclusive period has finished and it works out of the box on Linux with Steam Play Proton. Note: personal purchase.

    Concluding the Agent 47 saga, the Steam release of course had its own drama to deal with. While it has been out for a year already on the Epic Store (which doesn't support Linux at all), it arrived on Steam at full price which has rubbed a lot of people the wrong way. Add to that the thoroughly confusing and long list of packages for HITMAN 3, plus Humble Store being required to separate between Epic / Steam (with the Epic version at 50% off but Steam is not) - the result added together was not a good one for IO.

  • Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit Remastered Review on Linux - Boiling Steam

    The need for speed. It’s kind of hard to believe this series dates back almost 30 years ago. Even before the series came into existence for the 3DO in late 1994, EA had bought the company responsible for it, Distinctive Software, in 1991. Still, despite the criticism we tend to give EA for their greedy practices, there’s a gem from them that I hold dear to my heart: Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit.

    Maybe you’re fed up with the cops. You understand that their job is to ensure the peace of the county that they’re in, but perhaps you don’t trust them, or you find them cold, rude. Or you’re left scratching your head as to why you got pulled over for having a “dim license plate light” when in reality there’s nothing wrong with either you or your car, and now you’re late for work.

    Now let’s flip it the other way around: perhaps you’re a cop yourself (or you used to be one). You feel like no one appreciates the hard, risky work that you put forth in maintaining order. You’re tired of the nasty people you have to put up with when you pull them over.

  • The Ascent: A Cyberpunk 2077 Replacement? - Boiling Steam

    One of the most interesting games last year — and not without its own share of controversies — seems to be regarded from many as a worthy alternative, if not an outright substitute, for the disappointment that Cyberpunk 2077 was. In a similar setting but with Aliens, an “indentured” — an indebted individual forced to work for a big corporation — arrives on Planet Veles, and suddenly afterwards the corporation, The Ascent Group, goes bankrupt and all Hell goes loose. You have to investigate and find your way on this big metropolis, and defend yourself in the struggles for power happening in the aftermath. Comparing this to the CD Projekt game might seem absurd from the start, because although it is an Action RPG, it uses a completely different visual approach — not first-person like Cyberpunk, not even third-person like, say, Spiders Studio The Technomancer, but in a bird’s eye view, which is sometimes called “isometric” (technically, it’s not, but the term caught on), like Diablo, Titan Quest or Path of Exile.

  • Sauerbraten Is An Insanely Fun First Person Shooter - Invidious

    Sauerbraten is a free multiplayer and singleplayer first person shooter that is the successor of the old Cube FPS. Much like the original Cube, the aim of this game is fun, old school deathmatch gameplay and also to allow map/geometry editing to be done cooperatively in-game.

  • ArmA 3 & S.O.G. Prairie Fire DLC - Welcome to the Jungle II

Games: Steam Deck, Bitsy, XanMod, Ubuntu Budgie 22.04

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Gaming
  • Game devs don't seem convinced on the Steam Deck from the GDC 2022 survey | GamingOnLinux

    The annual game developer survey from GDC is out now for 2022 and it has some interesting insights as usual. That includes thoughts on the upcoming Steam Deck, with it clearly not selling everyone.

    Having a little browse through it today and here's a few things to stuck out to me. For starters, of the ~2,700 developers surveyed about 7% said they are currently developing for Linux. Interestingly, 8% said their next project would be developed for Linux. When it comes to what platform developers are most interested in, Linux sat at 7%. As expected all three of those saw "PC" as the top platform, which by that they of course mean specifically Windows.

    Stadia, Google's once promising cloud gaming solution doesn't seem to be really getting any love with it seeing 3-5% in those same questions. Streaming just doesn't seem all that popular with developers, with even Xbox Project xCloud (now just called Xbox Cloud Gaming) also seeing pretty low percentage interest from developers.

    Browser-based gaming is here to stay though, as according to the survey it seems 9-11% of developers are currently doing it or planning to do it.

  • The Steam Deck is about to ship and will not be DELAYED AGAIN. - Invidious

    The Steam Deck's final hardware has been spotted in both official--and non-official channels. This is the real, honest-to-goodness retail design and not a developer console. The Deck's about to ship, ladies and gentleman! In other news, the Steam Deck's shipping cost is included in the price listed on the preorder page.

  • Make a video game with Bitsy | Opensource.com

    There are many game design programs and many different possible approaches to game design, but for me, the one that stands out is Bitsy. Created by Adam Le Doux in 2017 and released under an MIT license, Bitsy is, in the words of its creator: "A little editor for little games or worlds. The goal is to make it easy to make games where you can walk around, talk to people, and be somewhere."

  • Install XanMod Kernel on elementary OS 6.0/6.1 - LinuxCapable

    XanMod is a free, open-source general-purpose Linux Kernel alternative to the stock kernel with elementary OS. It features custom settings and new features and is built to provide a responsive and smooth desktop experience, especially for new hardware.

    XanMod is popular amongst Linux Gaming, streaming, and ultra-low latency requirements and often boasts the latest Linux Kernels before landing on most distributions. Most desktop users are not even into gaming but want a new kernel for better hardware support, making XanMod one of the more popular choices.

    Installing a third-party kernel may be for you for users seeking to have their system kernel up to date and not wanting to install kernels or use the testing/unstable repositories manually.

    In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install the latest XanMod Kernel on elementary OS 6.xx.

  • Ubuntu Budgie 22.04 Has A Special Surprise For Linux Gamers

    Ubuntu Budgie is one of several Ubuntu “flavors,” and distinguishes itself from Ubuntu proper by using the Budgie desktop environment, and incorporating lightweight applets that extend functionality and features.

    Helpful, Out Of The Box

    It’s an elegant Linux distribution making a concerted effort to be as user-friendly as possible. This begins with an attractive Welcome app that appears after the OS is installed. “Budgie Welcome” aggregates a treasure trove of information, settings and software that are incredibly helpful to have at first-run.

    Whether you want to update your GPU driver, select a default browser, customize your desktop theme, configure backups, add extra functionality, learn keyboard shortcuts, or get involved with the community, the options are there and they’re smartly organized.

Games: Oversteer, Stellaris, and Kitsune Tails

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Gaming
  • Steering Wheel manager Oversteer expands supported wheels in 0.7.0 | GamingOnLinux

    Oversteer continues to be the best way to setup and configure Steering Wheels on Linux. Oversteer 0.7.0 is out now and expands support for more wheels. Since, like a lot of other special hardware, the original manufacturer doesn't support Linux, community efforts like this are essential.

  • Stellaris 3.3 Unity gets a Beta available on Steam | GamingOnLinux

    Paradox Interactive are gearing up ready for the next major update to their space strategy game Stellaris. A new opt-in Beta is available for the 3.3 Unity update.

    There's still plenty of work to be done to finish the update with it still in active development, however this is your time to get in early and see what's new and report any issues. Currently some new localization strings are only in English and there's some placeholders but there's a lot of new features and reworks.

  • Kitsune Tails gets an all-star voice cast | GamingOnLinux

    Kitsune Tails is an upcoming LGBTQ-focused retro story platformer from Kitsune Games and MidBoss, LLC. that's due out later this year. Looks great for platformer fans and it's going to have quite the voice cast.

    There's what seems like a nice big mix of people getting involved with Kira Buckland (the voice of iconic NiEr: Automata protagonist 2B, Street Fighter V’s Falke, and JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Stone Ocean’s Jolynne Cujoh) plus Angela Tran (Genshin Impact, Lake, Summer in Mara), Katlyn Dannes (The Homework's Revenge: Esther in Wonderland and Square Roots), Brent Mukai (Ratchet and Clank: Rift Apart, Pokemon Masters) and more.

Games: Steam Deck, Sega, and More

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Gaming
  • A whole bunch of games just got Steam Deck Verified | GamingOnLinux

    Seems Valve has now properly started verifying games ahead of the Steam Deck launch, with a bunch of titles now verified ready to play so let's take a look. The list can be seen on SteamDB.

  • Reverse Engineering The SEGA Mega Drive | Hackaday

    With the widespread adoption of emulators, almost anyone can start playing video games from bygone eras. Some systems are even capable of supporting homebrew games, with several having active communities that are still creating new games even decades later. This ease of programming for non-PC platforms wasn’t always so easy, though. If you wanted to develop games on a now-antique console when it was still relatively new, you had to jump through a lot of hoops. [Tore] shows us how it would have been done with his Sega Mega Drive development kit that he built from scratch.

  • Yu-Gi-Oh! Master Duel is out on Steam and runs well on Linux | GamingOnLinux

    Want to get into a new card game? Yu-Gi-Oh! Master Duel just released on Steam from Konami Digital Entertainment and the great news is that it works out of the box with Steam Play Proton Experimental on Linux.

    A good thing too of course, as the more new releases that work right away the better the chances of more people using Linux - and it's always good news for the upcoming Steam Deck too. Yu-Gi-Oh! Master Duel has already proven to be massively popular, with it being #4 on Steam's top games by player count (a peak count of 164,465 playing!). Konami claim this is the "definitive edition of the competitive card game that has been evolving for over 20 years".

  • Get a fresh up close and personal look at the Steam Deck with Hellish Quart | GamingOnLinux

    Want a really close view on the Steam Deck in action? Hellish Quart developer Kubold recently had a Steam Deck devkit delivered so they took a video.

    Can't say I had heard of Hellish Quart until seeing the video either. It's a physics based, realistic, 3D sword duelling game set in the 17th century and you know what? It looks like a huge amount of fun actually! Not only that, it appears to now work just fine with Steam Play Proton. The developer mentioned they will be updating the game to have controller glyphs for the moves list, which it will need to get Verified properly and it's something that should benefit all gamepad players.

Games: Gaming on Chromebook, Red Tether, Arch, and Total War: WARHAMMER

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Gaming
  • Gaming on Chromebook - Invidious

    Some of the models of Chromebook come with GOOD specs. However, they aren't utilized properly and let me show you how I run BOTH rise of the tomb raider and rocket league on a chromebook.

  • Action-packed 'combat-puzzle' roguelite Red Tether is out now | GamingOnLinux

    It's actually called ---Red---Tether--> but that would look a bit odd in the headline. A new release from indie dev Sleeper Games, it's a thoroughly unique looking shoot 'em up with pretty fun looking gameplay.

    With the help of a tether harpoon, you will take down large space fleets using an indirect combat system. Instead of firing off your phasers, you'll be hoping your harpoon is well placed to help you tear ships apart and throw them around the screen.

  • All Roads Lead to Arch: The Evolution of Linux Distros Used for Gaming Over Time - Boiling Steam

    ProtonDB is mostly used to track games, but there is another way to use it: to track the evolution of Linux distros used by gamers over time. Turns out we have now a great dataset since 2018 of what distributions were used to make reports of ProtonDB, and we can exploit that observe trends. The usual caveats apply (for the methodology, see at the end of this article for more details): this may not be representative of the Linux Gaming market at large, there are variations month after month so we won’t care about a few percents ups and down, and so on. Enough said, you already know all that. Still, I would argue that people who contribute to ProtonDB are avid and active Linux Gamers, and probably at the forefront of larger trends. You can expect ProtonDB users to feature more tinkerers as well, so seeing Arch over-represented is not surprising. But the point is that the sample is probably consistent over time, and we are interested in how the choice of ProtonDB users is evolving since 2018.

  • Total War: WARHAMMER III gets a short hype-trailer for The Daemon Prince | GamingOnLinux

    Total War: WARHAMMER III is getting real close to the release now, and it's getting exciting for strategy fans to see the conclusion of this epic. Launching officially on February 17, it will be "available as close to launch day as possible on macOS and Linux".

    Seems Creative Assembly decided you need to get hyped and remember it's coming, as they've released a short new trailer to show off the rather boringly named (compared with other Warhammer naming that is) Daemon Prince. The trailer may be short but it is pretty great at making me want it now.

Games: Arch-Based Steam Deck, VR, and RetroArch

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Gaming
  • dbrand are cooking up something big for the Steam Deck | GamingOnLinux

    It's not entirely clear what dbrand has planned, however their team are clearly cooking up something with a teaser being posted on Twitter.

    Who are dbrand? They're a company that specialises in creating custom skins, cases, screen protectors and plenty more for various hardware from phones to consoles and stuff in between - they even make face masks. They're really popular so it's not surprising to see plenty of excitement around their plans for the Steam Deck.

  • One of the most challenging VR rhythm games releases February 10 | GamingOnLinux

    VR rhythm game Groove Gunner from BitCutter Studios Inc will be leaving Early Access on February 10. If you own a VR kit, this is one you need to try. It will make you sweat - probably a lot.

    Much like other rhythm games, it's all about speed and accuracy. Instead of cutting through blocks like you do in Beat Saber, you have two coloured guns which you use to shoot and each arm also has a shield that you need to block incoming projectiles with. It's very different to any other rhythm game and easily stands above some other attempts to make a VR game.

  • RetroArch need your feedback on their Open-Hardware planned for 2022 | GamingOnLinux

    RetroArch announced back in February 2021 their plans for the Open-Hardware project. This was to bring an easy way for you to play your legally owned physical games directly in emulators and they have an update on their plans.

    The idea is a sound one. Giving you open source hardware to plug in various cartridges from retro consoles, with great integration with RetroArch directly. You would no longer need to rely on various hard to come by proprietary solutions. In the new blog post though, plans have changed - and sounds like it's for the better.

Wine 7.0 Released with Support for New GPUs, Multiple Displays, and WoW64

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Linux
News
Gaming

After a year of development, Wine 7.0 is here to introduce lots of goodies to satisfy your Windows application and gaming needs. First of all, it brings support for the WoW64 (64-bit Windows-on-Windows) architecture to allow you to run 32-bit Windows programs inside a 64-bit Unix host process.

On top of that, Wine 7.0 adds support for multiple displays (multi-head) to its Direct3D implementation to allow you to choose which monitor a Direct3D program will use for full-screen mode, along with display gamma adjustment using the DXGI API, and support for new GPUs.

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Games: Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, Penguin Heist, and More

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Gaming
  • Counter-Strike: Global Offensive updated, more tweaking for Steam Deck + Vulkan | GamingOnLinux

    Valve continues to tweak more of their games ahead of the Steam Deck release in February and their focus now appears to be on CS:GO with a fresh update out.

    A few more Steam Input improvements came for controllers, with their newer "FlickStick" mode enabled in the game options instead of the Steam Input Configurator and there's also refinements to the behaviour. For those not aware, FlickStick created by Jibb Smart is in essence a quick way to turn to face any direction in a game, allowing you to be more accurate and speedy with gamepad sticks. Valve added support for it to Steam Input directly in 2021, now it has better native support in CS:GO.

  • Penguin Heist game hits 25,000 sales with 5% on Linux | GamingOnLinux

    The Greatest Penguin Heist of All Time developers That Fish / That Other Fish have announced their Early Access game seems to be doing reasonably well. Released back in July 2021, it's recently hit over 25,000 sales.

    "The Greatest Penguin Heist of All Time is the one and only 4 player CO-OP physics-based heist game featuring a bunch of kleptomanic penguins. You'll experience a blend of physics-based platforming with stealth, strategy, and action. You have full freedom to achieve the missions in your own way."

  • Mad Experiments 2: Escape Room releases on March 8 | GamingOnLinux

    March 8 will bring more puzzle / escape room antics with Mad Experiments 2: Escape Room from PlayTogether Studio.

    "Trapped in Professor Cheshire's mysterious mansion, players will have to explore and cooperate to get out of the rooms in the allotted time. Each room has its own secrets, puzzles... and story bits on Hildegarde and Professor Cheshire Learn more about Hildegarde's journey at the Cheshire Institute. From the library to the secret room to the dormitory, meet new characters, secrets, challenges, and strange events. Will Hildegarde find a way to escape? And will you?"

  • We'll always have Paris is a narrative adventure about loving someone with dementia | GamingOnLinux

    Cowleyfornia Studios, developer of Sarawak have recently announced their next story-based adventure game with We'll always have Paris. This will be an emotional one about loving someone with dementia. Much like the previous game, it will support Linux as the engine was developed on Linux.

    "This is the story of Simon Smith, a retired chef who lives with Claire, his wife of fifty years. Claire is slowly losing her memory, and Simon must balance his love for her with his desire to maintain normality and autonomy over the confusion that is infiltrating both their lives."

Games: Raspberry Pi, Steam Deck/Valve, Humble, and More

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Gaming
  • Raspberry Pi Changes Games By Scanning Barcodes | Tom's Hardware

    Creating a custom interface is one of the most exciting aspects of creating a retro gaming system with the Raspberry Pi. Tons of themes and original UIs have emerged over the years, but Neil, from YouTube channel RMC - The Cave, has taken things to the next level by creating a retro game shop replica as part of his retro games museum that functions as a front end for his emulation platform.

    Instead of selecting a game from a menu on the screen, users choose a game from the physical store shelves and scan it using a barcode scanner. Once a game is selected, it will automatically load for the user to play. The glue that makes all of this work, is a Raspberry Pi 3B and a little Linux magic.

  • Ys IX: Monstrum Nox gets improvements ready for the Steam Deck | GamingOnLinux

    Ys IX: Monstrum Nox from developers Nihon Falcom, PH3 GmbH, Engine Software and publisher NIS America, Inc. has released an update to get the game ready for the Steam Deck. There's no native port here though, it continues to rely on the Steam Play Proton compatibility layer.

    Released on Steam back in July 2021, the latest update version 1.1.2 brings with it local co-op and some improvements to the aspect ratio support.

  • Valve continues tweaking their new Store Hubs for tags | GamingOnLinux

    With Valve's latest store updates experiment that's ongoing, they gave a new look to Store Hubs for all the various tags and they just release an update with plenty of tweaks.

    Steam Labs Experiment 13 that was announced back in December gave the same refresh that other parts of Steam had seen, to upgrade the browsing experience with more information and to better make use of all the data they have. More personalization, items from your wishlist and more.

  • Humble Bundle Drops Linux and macOS, Gives Customers Mere Weeks to Save Their Games
  • Mac and Linux Support for Humble Choice Subscription Service Ending Soon | Windows-Only Launcher
  • Humble Bundle Will Be Moving To A Subscription Service
  • New Steam Games with Native Linux Clients - 2022-01-18 Edition - Boiling Steam

    Between 2022-01-11 and 2022-01-18 there were 22 new games released on Steam with Linux clients. For reference, during the same time, there were 235 games released for Windows on Steam, so the Linux versions represent about 9.4 % of total released titles.

  • Acid-Damaged Game Boy Restored | Hackaday

    The original Game Boy was the greatest selling handheld video game system of all time, only to be surpassed by one of its successors. It still retains the #2 position by a wide margin, but even so, they’re getting along in years now and finding one in perfect working condition might be harder than you think. What’s more likely is you find one that’s missing components, has a malfunctioning screen, or has had its electronics corroded by the battery acid from a decades-old set of AAs.

    That latter situation is where [Taylor] found himself and decided on performing a full restoration on this classic. To get started, he removed all of the components from the damaged area so he could see the paths of the traces. After doing some cleaning of the damage and removing the solder mask, he used 30 gauge wire to bridge the damaged parts of the PCB before repopulating all of the parts back to their rightful locations. A few needed to be replaced, but in the end the Game Boy was restored to its former 90s glory.

Old Firewall Reborn As Retro PC | Hackaday

Filed under
Hardware
Gaming

In two follow-up videos (here and here), he builds an enclosure (instructions on Thingiverse) and tries out several other operating systems. He was able to get the Tiny Core Linux distribution running with the NetSurf browser, but failed to get Windows 2000 or XP to work. Returning to Windows 98, he tweaks drivers and settings and eventually has a respectable retro-gaming computer for his efforts. The next time you’re cleaning out your junk bins, have a peek inside those pizza-box gadgets first — you may find a similar gem.

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More in Tux Machines

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • Fedora Community Blog: CPE Weekly Update – Week of January 17th – 22nd
  • Friday's Fedora Facts: 2022-03 – Fedora Community Blog

    Here’s your weekly Fedora report. Read what happened this week and what’s coming up. Your contributions are welcome (see the end of the post)! I have weekly office hours on Wednesdays in the morning and afternoon (US/Eastern time) in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. See the upcoming meetings for more information.

  • Architecting the way: Andrew Block

    One of Andrew Block’s favorite things about Red Hat? Being able to contribute back to the open source community. He says, "As long as you are innovating and making yourself better, let’s go ahead and work better together." Block is among the first Distinguished Architects at Red Hat. Distinguished Architects are senior-level technical contributors who've continued to advance in their careers working directly with customers and applying experience and knowledge of Red Hat technologies. We had a chance to chat with Block about his experience working with Red Hat customers and the innovation that architects can help bring to their organizations.

  • Meet Red Hat’s bankers: Insights from Monica Sasso

    As you sit in a meeting room (virtual or in-person), take a moment to think through the perspectives, experiences and insights of those around you being brought to that meeting. We did just that and quickly realized the wealth of knowledge from our colleagues at the table from around the world, who were former financial services leaders. Our "bankers," as we call them, have a broad and deep understanding of financial services because they’ve experienced it first-hand.

  • Copr - look back at 2021

    We did eight releases of Mock. We moved Mock’s wiki to GitHub Pages to allow indexing by search engines https://rpm-software-management.github.io/mock/ and created a Fedora-based Jekyll container for local documentation testing (https://github.com/praiskup/jekyll-github-pages-fedora-container).

  • Contribute at the Fedora Linux 36 Test Week for Kernel 5.16

    The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.16. This version was just recently released, and will arrive soon in Fedora. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week from Sunday, January 23, 2022 through Sunday, January 29, 2022. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

  • Irving Wladawsky-Berger: A Blockchain-based Framework for Safeguarding the Integrity of Real-World Assets

    Blockchains first came to light in 2008 as the architecture underpinning bitcoin, the best known and most widely held cryptocurrency. It’s a truly brilliant architecture built on decades-old fundamental research in cryptography, distributed data, game theory and other advanced technologies. The blockchain’s original vision was limited to enabling bitcoin users to transact directly with each other with no need for a financial institution or government agency to certify the validity of the transactions. But, like the Internet and other transformative technologies, blockchain has now transcended its original objectives. Blockchains are a kind of distributed ledger technologies (DLT), which also include non-blockchain DLTs. Over the past decade, an increasing number of people, including me, consider blockchains and DLTs as major next steps in the evolution of the Internet. In 2016 the World Economic Forum (WEF) named The Blockchain in its annual list of Top Ten Emerging Technologies citing its potential to fundamentally change the way markets and governments work. “Like the Internet, the blockchain is an open, global infrastructure upon which other technologies and applications can be built,” said the WEF. “And like the Internet, it allows people to bypass traditional intermediaries in their dealings with each other, thereby lowering or even eliminating transaction costs.”

  • Flathub to verify first-party apps and allow developers to collect monies | GamingOnLinux

    Flathub and Flatpak packages are the future of Linux apps according to more people and GNOME are continuing to invest in it. They have some big plans to improve it too. Writing in a new blog post on the GNOME Foundation website, they went over a number of things and not just Flathub related but that's what we're going to focus on for this article. The plans actually sounds pretty good! Firstly, Flathub is going to gain a way to process and verify apps from first-party teams. As in, developers who directly publish their app and manage the Flatpak package process for Flathub. A way to actually properly distinguish official apps from community builds will be quite important for so many reasons (security, privacy and so on). Not only that but GNOME want to give developers a way to collect donations and subscriptions too, which is also important to help make it more sustainable. Sounds like it's possible a way will be added for developers to share some of the revenue with Flathub too, ensuring it too is sustainable.

Audiocasts/Shows: Hackaday Podcast, Linux From Scratch, Linux Mint 20.3 "Una" Xfce, and More

  • Hackaday Podcast 152: 555 Timer Extravaganza, EMF Chip Glitching 3 Ways, A Magnetic Mechanical Keyboard, And The Best Tricorder Ever | Hackaday

    Join Hackaday Editor-in-Chief Elliot Williams and Managing Editor Tom Nardi as they bring you up to speed on the best stories and projects from the week. There’s some pretty unfortunate news for the physical media aficionados in the audience, but if you’re particularly keen on 50 year old integrated circuits, you’ll love hearing about the winners of the 555 Timer Contest. We’ll take a look at a singing circuit sculpture powered by the ESP32, extol the virtues of 3D printed switches, follow one hacker’s dream of building the ultimate Star Trek tricorder prop, and try to wrap our heads around how electronic devices can be jolted into submission. Stick around to the end as we take a close look at some extraordinary claims about sniffing out computer viruses, and wrap things up by wondering why everyone is trying to drive so far.

  • Linux From Scratch: Another Day, Another Compiler - Invidious

    We're back for more LFS, last week we didn't make a ton of progress but hopefully this week it goes at least a little bit better but I'm not making any promises

  • Linux Mint 20.3 "Una" Xfce overview | Light, simple, efficient. - Invidious

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Linux Mint 20.3 "Una" Xfce and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Noodlings 36 | The Wires and Tubes

    This is my segment where I like to look back in time and see how the world of technology has advanced and how things have stayed the same. I find we often forget how far we have come and how good we have it while not always remember how we got here. Having some historical perspective on computers and technology can help to drive some appreciation for what we have today.

Proprietary Security: Windows and McAfee

  • This Week In Security: NetUSB, HTTP.sys, And 2013’s CVE Is Back | Hackaday

    A serious problem has been announced in Windows Server 2019 and Windows 10, with some versions vulnerable in their default configurations. The problem is in how Windows handles HTTP Trailer packets, which contain extra information at the end of normal HTTP transfers. There is a PoC available that demonstrates a crash. It appears that an additional information leak vulnerability would have to be combined with this one to produce a true exploit. This seems to be a different take on CVE-2021-31166, essentially exploiting the same weakness, and working around the incomplete fix. This issue was fixed in the January patch set for Windows, so make sure you’re covered.

  • CISA Adds Four Known Exploited Vulnerabilities to Catalog | CISA

    CISA has added four new vulnerabilities to its Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog, based on evidence that threat actors are actively exploiting the vulnerabilities listed in the table below. These types of vulnerabilities are a frequent attack vector for malicious cyber actors of all types and pose significant risk to the federal enterprise.

  • McAfee Releases Security Update for McAfee Agent for Windows  | CISA

    McAfee has released McAfee Agent for Windows version 5.7.5, which addresses vulnerabilities CVE-2021-31854 and CVE-2022-0166. An attacker could exploit these vulnerabilities to take control of an affected system.

today's howtos

  • FTP server container Podman fast and right and 4 dirty steps

    FTP server container stands for “File Transfer Protocol” and is an excellent protocol for downloading files from a remote or local server or uploading files onto the server. Using FTP proves to be a primary task after it has been set up correctly. It works by having a server listening for connections (on port 21 by default) from clients. The clients can access a remote directory with their user account and then download or upload files there, depending on the permissions that have been granted to them. It’s also possible to configure anonymous authorization, which means users will not need their account to connect to the FTP server. On Centos Linux, there are many different FTP server containers and client software packages available. You can even use default GUI and command-line tools as an FTP client. In addition, a stylish and highly-configurable FTP server package is vsftpd, known for many Linux systems, including Centos. This guide will go over the step-by-step instructions to install vsftpd on Centos. We’ll also see how to configure the container FTP server through various settings, then use the command line, GNOME GUI, or FTP client software to connect to the FTP server. Creating FTP users tutorial.

  • How to Back Up Your Linux System With Rsync - JumpCloud

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