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OSS

Linux for Starters: Your Guide to Linux – Managing Users – Part 15

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OSS
Ubuntu

This is a series that offers a gentle introduction to Linux for newcomers.

This article explains how to create users on your Ubuntu machine. Let’s start with a brief explanation of groups as they are central to the process.

Groups help define the permissions and access for each user account. They determine who has access to files, directories, settings, devices, and more. Finding out the groups to which a user account belongs helps give you a better understanding of that user’s access (and troubleshoot when things don’t function as expected).

In a default desktop installation, the first user on the system is considered an administrator. That user is a member of various groups. The groups command shows the groups to which a user belongs.

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How my team built an open source learning experience platform

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OSS

Learning is based on the open exchange of ideas and experiences. By sharing, testing, and practicing what we've learned with others, we're able to develop in our lives and careers. It follows that openness is the ideal state for any successful learning organization.

I am passionate about learning, building teams, and technology. At Red Hat, we believe that open source powers innovation and results in better solutions. Five years ago, our learning management system was proprietary and closed. All of our learning platforms existed as islands with limited integration and provided a mediocre user experience. Over the past five years, our team has embraced the open source ethos. We've built and implemented new open source platforms, integrated our disparate learning platforms allowing us to freely exchange data and create a superior user experience.

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Zulip: An Interesting Open-Source Alternative to Slack

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Software
OSS

Zulip is an open-source collaboration platform that pitches itself as a better replacement to Slack. Let us take a closer look.

Messaging and collaboration platforms make a big difference when it comes to your work.

While there are several options available, Slack is a popular one used by many organizations. But, what about an open-source alternative to Slack that you can self-host?

Zulip is one such software.

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ProtonVPN: An Open-Source VPN for Privacy-Minded Users

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OSS
Security

ProtonVPN is a Swiss-based multi-platform open-source VPN service popular for its spectacular GUI, convenience for connecting to other routers, and strict no-log policy.

If you are familiar with ProtonMail, then you might be excited to know that it is the same team of scientists, cryptographers, and engineers that is behind both applications.

Unlike a lot of other VPN services, ProtonVPN has security and privacy as its main focus and this is the reason why it learns from working with activists and journalists in the field. It sends all user traffic first through its core network in privacy-friendly countries e.g., Iceland and Switzerland so that even if a VPN endpoint server is compromised, users’ true IP addresses will remain hidden.

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Excellent Utilities: broot – next gen tree explorer and customizable launcher

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OSS
Reviews

This is a series highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We cover a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides.

The Command Line Interface (CLI) is a way of interacting with your computer. To harness all the power of Linux, it’s highly recommended mastering the interface. It’s true the CLI is often perceived as a barrier for users migrating to Linux, particularly if they’re grown up using GUI software exclusively. While Linux rarely forces anyone to use the CLI, some tasks are better suited to this method of interaction, offering inducements like superior scripting opportunities, remote access, and being far more frugal with a computer’s resources.

The part of the operating system responsible for managing files and directories is called the file system. It organizes our data into files, which hold information, and directories (also called ‘folders’), which hold files or other directories.

One of the commands that help visualize your file system is tree, a command that list contents of directories in a tree-like format. One of the issues with tree is that the output is unwieldy with large directories. Step forward broot, a utility that gives an overview of a directory, and much much more.

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Use this open source tool for automated unit testing

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OSS

Modernizing and transforming legacy applications is a challenging activity that involves several tasks. One of the key tasks is validating that the modernized application preserves the functionality of the legacy application. Unfortunately, this can be tedious and hard to perform. Legacy applications often do not have automated test cases, or, if available, test coverage might be inadequate, both in general and specifically for covering modernization-related changes. A poorly maintained test suite might also contain many obsolete tests (accumulated over time as the application evolved). Therefore, validation is mainly done manually in most modernization projects—it is a process that is time-consuming and may not test the application sufficiently. In some reported case studies, testing accounted for approximately 70% to 80% of the time spent on modernization projects [1]. Tackle-test is an automated testing tool designed to address this challenge.

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Best Free and Open Source Alternatives to Microsoft GitHub

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Software
OSS

Microsoft’s stance for decades was that community creation and sharing of communal code (later to be known as free and open source software) represented a direct attack on their business. Their battle with Linux stretches back many years. Back in 2001, former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer famously tarnished Linux “a cancer that attaches itself in an intellectual property sense to everything it touches”. Microsoft also initiated its “Get the Facts” marketing campaign from mid-2003, which specifically criticized Linux server usage, total cost of ownership, security, indemnification and reliability. The campaign was widely criticized for spreading misinformation.

However, in recent years, there has been a partial shift by Microsoft to embrace the open source software paradigm. For example, some of their code is open sourced. Examples include Visual Studio Code, .NET Framework, Atom, and PowerShell. They have also made investments in Linux development, server technology and organizations including the Linux Foundation and Open Source Initiative. They have made acquisitions such as Xamarin to help mobile app development, and GitHub a hugely popular code repository for open source developers. And they have partnered with Canonical, the developers of the popular Ubuntu distro. But many developers remain hugely sceptical about Microsoft and their apparent shift to embrace open source.

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Free Software Leftovers

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OSS
  • Best 12 Open-source social media management tools for Business

    Social media can be a time suck and overwhelming. Luckily, there are lots of social media tools and apps that will help make your life a little easier.

    Creating and managing social media takes time and creating great social media content while making sure that your content delivers the highest ROI takes even more time, but the good news is with the right tools you can save a bunch of time create an epic piece of content in minutes and ultimately making your life as a social media manager much easier.

    In this article, we are going to share with you our favorite open source, social media tools for brands that will help you get a big result and look like a rock star to your boss.

  • Focalboard: OS Trello Alternative with full desktop support for Windows, Linux and macOS

    Focalboard is a kanban-based app for server and desktops. It is totally free open-source app which team and individuals can install and use without any charge.

    The app works smoothly on macOS (M1 edition), and we start using it on regular basis. It also does not require a steep learning curve, everything is self-explanatory, which makes it a productive tool for developers.

    Focalboard supports multiple board, multiple languages and comes with import and export options for boards and tasks, making it easy to migrate.

    [...]

    Focalboard is released as an open-source project under MIT license.

  • Meeting every Friday: Help us update the Free Software Directory

    Volunteers are an essential part of the Free Software Foundation’s (FSF) work, and we’re so grateful for every minute that so many of you have put in to endorse and expand free software. If you’ve been looking for another opportunity to chip in, here’s an easy way to make a difference: every Friday, we host an IRC meeting to improve and add to the Free Software Directory!

    The Free Software Directory is a catalog of free software online. Co-founded by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the directory currently contains over 16,500 packages, and is in constant usage by visitors eager to discover free software, explore information about version control, documentation, and licensing, and to study trends in free software. So far this year, as of this writing, the Directory has welcomed 486,510 unique visitors, with an average of 69,501 each month!

  • Major U.K. science funder to require grantees to make papers immediately free to all
  • UKRI just released its open access policy

    As part of our work supporting efforts in the creation, adoption and implementation of open access policies with various institutions, Creative Commons (CC) was pleased to lend its knowledge to assist UKRI in developing its open access policy as part of the Open Access Review last year. Generally, CC is committed to the goal of ensuring that the public is able to access immediately, free of charge, and without restriction, the peer-reviewed research articles and academic books resulting from publicly funded research. We are pleased to see that the comments we provided back in May 2020 have been taken into account in the review process. We are especially glad to see that key requirements of the new policy include immediate open access for research articles and the release of publications under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license (CC BY) (CC BY ND by exception only*).

3 steps for managing a beginner-friendly open source community

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OSS

When someone is new to contributing to open source, the best place to start is often beginner-friendly bugs and issues. But before they can do that, they have to be able to find those kinds of issues. As a member of an open source project, there's a lot you can do to help beginners find a way to contribute.

Bearing this in mind, the AnitaB.org open source community prioritizes making our community beginner-friendly. We have initiatives to ensure that we're inclusive for contributors at different levels of experience and for different types of contributions that don't only relate to coding.

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Emulate the Oric home computer with Linux

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Software
OSS

Emulation is the practice of using a program (called an emulator) on a PC to mimic the behaviour of a home computer or a video game console, in order to play (usually retro) games on a computer.

Home computers were a class of microcomputers that entered the market in 1977 and became common during the 1980s. They were marketed to consumers as affordable and accessible computers that, for the first time, were intended for the use of a single non-technical user.

Back in the 1980s, home computers came to the forefront of teenagers’ minds. Specifically, the Amiga, ZX Spectrum, and Atari ST were extremely popular. They were hugely popular home computers targeted heavily towards games, but they also ran other types of software.

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