Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Sci/Tech

GNU Scientific Library 2.7 released

Filed under
GNU
Sci/Tech

Version 2.7 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C.
This release introduces some new features and fixes several bugs. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

Read more

Needed Free and Open Source Medicine

Filed under
GNU
Sci/Tech

So, what could be the solution? This reminds one of a similar situation in computer software when hardware prices dropped like a stone in water but software costs rose like a helium balloon and became the dominant part of the cost for anyone wishing to use a computer. This was made possible by converting software into a product which offers only the right to use, as opposed to the prevailing practice of allowing the users to do whatever they want with it, as was done in the Unix world before software became proprietary. Thus was born Free Software, launched by a prominent hacker of the time at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Mr. Richard M. Stallman under the project he called GNU’s Not Unix (with the recursive acronym GNU). This is software that gives users the freedom to use, share, study and modify. With those rights, the software became freely downloadable at zero cost, enabling anyone to use even an old computer, and thus making it accessible to virtually anyone. Today the software has grown to be the dominant one among all computing devices.

Can this be a model for medicine too? Yes, indeed. It can. In fact, there are medical systems other than modern medicine that practised this kind of openness. All traditional medical systems were open, as the concept of the ownership of knowledge, such as copyright and patent laws came only very recently. In fact, the first copyright law was enacted only in 1710 by Queen Anne of England and was known as the Statute of Anne. It was actually meant to prevent publishers from controlling the printing and sales of books to benefit only themselves. The statute sought to benefit the authors in order to encourage them to write more for the good of society. That it eventually got to be controlled by publishers is another story altogether.

The point is that, before all that happened, all knowledge was free (well, almost1), and everyone could learn whatever they wanted. Thus, medicines were often prescribed not by just a name, but by giving the recipe to prepare them. This continues to be the custom in systems like Ayurveda, Siddha and Unani systems of medicine developed in India and the Arab world and the Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCM2). But these medical systems may not be acceptable to many who are looking for scientific validation. This, unfortunately, is a drawback of these systems that were created millennia before modern science was born. But it could be easily recified if some researchers in the medical field are open-minded enough to do experiments to validate their medicines and treatment protocols, which have many pieces of anecdotal evidence of success. Alternatively, the government of India could direct its own Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences (CCRAS) to validate Ayurvedic, Siddha or Unani treatment protocols using modern scientific methods.

Read more

Martian rover has some Linux computers, too

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

NASA’s Perseverance rover is equipped with a Linux-driven, Atom-based CompuLab COMEX-IE38 module designed to compress images. The rover also has a Qualcomm 801 Linux system like its Ingenuity copter, which is embarking on a new scouting mission.

As LinuxGizmos and many other sites reported in February, NASA’s semi-autonomous Ingenuity drone copter is equipped with an embedded Linux computer based on the Qualcomm 801 (formerly Snapdragon 801). Ingenuity, which has since run several successful test flights on Mars, making it the first craft to fly in the atmosphere of an extra-terrestrial planet, uses the Qualcomm 801 via the Qualcomm Flight platform for navigation and camera control and processing.

Read more

BREAKING NEWS: Linux Flies on Mars

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is the American space agency responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and space research.

A tiny and extremely lightweight helicopter, named Ingenuity, was transported to Mars in NASA’s Perseverance Rover. Ingenuity was deployed on 3 April 2021.

NASA has successfully flown this helicopter on the red planet today.

As it’s primarily a technology demonstration, Ingenuity’s first powered flight on the alien planet was brief. The Mars-copter flew to about 3m, hover, swivel and safely land in its momentous 40 second flight. But it’s a huge step forwards, paving the way for longer flights and the prospect of this technology undertaking reconnaissance missions.

[...]

This is a moment in history for us to remember. An open source operating system built by thousands flies a helicopter on another planet.

Read more

Google operates with a Debian developer to produce COVID-19 research simpler on Linux

Filed under
Google
Debian
Sci/Tech
Ubuntu

“The Bazel team jumped in to help Olek and the COVID-19 research community. Yun Peng, Software Engineer at Google with Olek Wojnar led the team of Bazel and Debian volunteers to move the project forward. The joint effort between Debian and Google has produced some great results, including packaging the Bazel bootstrap variant in 6 months’ time (Debian 11 — released in Late 2021; Ubuntu 21.04 — 22 April 2021),” clarifies Google.

The search giant further says, “Bazel is now available as an easy to install package distributed on Debian and Ubuntu. The extended Google team continues to work with Debian towards the next step of packaging and distributing Tensorflow on Debian and other Linux distributions.”

While Olek Wojnar deserves a lot of credit for this successful partnership, Google has clearly acquired significant praise as well. Not only has the search giant assisted amazingly in this case, yet it has for some time been a companion of both the open-source and Linux communities.

Read more

More Statistics

Filed under
KDE
Software
Sci/Tech

Right now the feature set of LabPlot that can be used for the statistical analysis is very limited – we only show some values from the descriptive statistics for the selected data set in the spreadsheet. While we’re thinking about which features to add and which workflows to enable in our application to support this kind of analysis in near future, we decided to implement and to add some “quick wins” now.

[...]

The next natural step for this feature would be to enable this functionality in the worksheet and to extend it. E.g., it should be possible for the user to create such a Q-Q plot on the worksheet and to specify which probability distribution to use to compare the data set quantiles against. Similar for the KDE-plot where it should be possible to specify the kernel or for the box plot where the user can modify the type of the whiskers, etc.

Read more

Third time's a harm? Microsoft tries to get twice-rejected compression patent past skeptical examiners

Filed under
Microsoft
Sci/Tech
Legal

In June, 2019, Microsoft applied for a US patent covering enhancements to a data encoding method known as rANS, one of several variants in the Asymmetric Numeral System (ANS) family that form the foundation of data compression schemes used by Apple, Facebook, Google, various other companies, and open source projects.

Its US patent application was published on the last day of 2020. Recently, the inventor of ANS, Jarosław Duda, assistant professor at Institute of Computer Science at Jagiellonian University in Poland, expressed concern that if Microsoft's patent application is granted, anyone using software that incorporates an ANS-based encoder could be at risk of a potential infringement claim.

[...]

"Google ended up abandoning that application," said Alex Moss, staff attorney for the EFF and Mark Cuban Chair to Eliminate Stupid Patents, in an email to The Register. "But it looks like Microsoft picked up right where it left off."

"Professor Duda’s concerns about the Microsoft application are similarly well-founded: these are broad claims that implicate practically any use of ANS without adding anything new and non-obvious," said Moss.

The USPTO has already said as much, Moss explained: It has rejected this application twice before, including a final rejection for obviousness.

The USPTO issued a non-final rejection of the application on May 21, 2020. Microsoft sought a review of the decision and the patent agency then issued a final rejection on October 27, 2020.

Yet on March 2, 2021, Microsoft tried one more time to get its patent application approved. In a USPTO explanatory filing, attorney Kyle Rinehart said, "The Applicant respectfully disagrees with the rejections."

"Microsoft’s recent filing takes advantage of what’s called the "After Final Consideration Pilot 2.0" program," Moss explained. "This program was started under former Director of the Patent Office, Andrei Iancu, and before leaving office, he extended the program through September 30, 2021."

Read more

How to visualize complex data on Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Sci/Tech
HowTos

You’ve probably heard of Elasticsearch – the search engine that enables you to index and then quickly search through your data. You may have created a few visualizations in Kibana, the GUI for Elasticsearch, pointing and clicking your way through the sleek interface.

What you may not have used is a lesser-known visualization plugin called Timelion.

Timelion is a fantastic visualization creation tool that makes it possible to write out your queries in its simple and powerful expression language to display graphs. It’s used for displaying time-series data such as population growth or hits to your website.

Read more

Google works with a Debian developer to make COVID-19 research easier on Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian
Sci/Tech

Medical research surrounding COVID-19 isn't over though, as scientists still have plenty of work to do. Olek Wojnar, a developer of the Linux-based Debian operating system, has been working to help these scientists by packaging some software for easy installation on Linux. One of those packages was Google's build software Bazel. Upon finding out about Wojnar's efforts, Google offered to help with the process.

"The Bazel team jumped in to help Olek and the COVID-19 research community. Yun Peng, Software Engineer at Google with Olek Wojnar led the team of Bazel and Debian volunteers to move the project forward. The joint effort between Debian and Google has produced some great results, including packaging the Bazel bootstrap variant in 6 months time (Debian 11 -- released in Late 2021; Ubuntu 21.04 -- 22 April 2021)," explains Google.

The search giant further says, "Bazel is now available as an easy to install package distributed on Debian and Ubuntu. The extended Google team continues to work with Debian towards the next step of packaging and distributing Tensorflow on Debian and other Linux distributions."

Read more

Linux Has Landed On Mars

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Sci/Tech

NASA has landed a new rover called Perseverance on Mars. It has it's own miniature helicopter named Ingenuity that can take off, navigate, and land on Mars without human intervention. Ingenuity runs a custom Linux-based operating system, Linux has now reached Mars.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Tiny i.MX8M Mini module also ships on dev kit with Digi XBee

Digi’s rugged “ConnectCore 8M Mini” module runs Linux or Android on an i.MX8M Mini with Digi TrustFence security, up to 2GB LPDDR4 and 8GB eMMC, and 802.11ac/Bluetooth 5.0. A dev kit offers mini-PCIe and Digi XBee expansion. Digi has launched a Digi ConnectCore 8M Mini module and development kit that feature NXP’s i.MX8M Mini and support for Digi XBee modules including cellular add-ons. The ConnectCore 8M Mini has the same 45 x 40 x 3.5mm dimensions as the i.MX8X based Digi ConnectCore 8X module from 2018. We missed a similarly sized, i.MX8M Nano based ConnectCore 8M Nano from 2019, which has many of the features of the ConnectCore 8M Mini but is limited to 1GB RAM instead of 2GB. Read more

Most Beautiful Linux Distributions

Today there is Linux distribution for every type of computer user present on this planet irrespective of their work. From a kid studying in school to a professional working in a multinational company, there is Linux distribution available for every user. Linux is an open-source operating system; developers worldwide use various open-source technologies to develop a new surprising fork of Linux. Everyone gets tired of looking at the same desktop every day; we need something refreshing at a fixed interval of time to keep ourselves fresh and focused on work. Especially if you’re working on Windows or Mac OS, you get tired of the same look and layout because they generally possess the same look and feel even after some major updates. Read more

Best OCR Apps for Linux

This article will cover a list of useful “Optical Character Recognition” software available for Linux. An optical character recognition (OCR) software attempts to detect text content of non-text files whose content cannot be selected or copied but can be viewed or read. For instance, an OCR software can identify text from images, PDF or other scanned documents in digital file formats using various algorithms and AI based solutions. These OCR software are especially useful for converting and preserving old documents as they can be used to identify text and create digital copies. Sometimes the identified text may not be 100% accurate but OCR software removes the need for manual edits to a great extent by extracting as much text as possible. Manual edits can be made later to improve accuracy further and create one-to-one replicas. Most OCR software can extract text into separate files, though some also support superimposing a hidden text layer on original files. Superimposed text allows you to read content in original print and format but also allows you to select and copy text. This technique is specially used to digitize old documents into PDF format. Read more

Today in Techrights