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today''s leftovers

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  • Panfrost Gallium3D Driver Continues Speeding Ahead For Open-Source Mali Graphics

    Panfrost only made its initial debut as part of the recent Mesa 19.1 release for providing open-source Arm Mali Bifrost/Midgard graphics driver support on Linux independent of Arm and their official binary driver. While the resources are limited, so far Panfrost is making stellar progress. 

    Panfrost continues making terrific progress for providing open-source Arm Mali graphics support. In part, this is made by possible by lead developer Alyssa Rosenzweig currently interning for the summer at Collabora where she appears to be primarily working on this currently OpenGL ES 2.0 class driver and continuing to strive for competitive performance with Arm's official Linux GLES driver.

  • The big Civilization VI "June 2019 Update" for Gathering Storm is now live

    Firaxis Games, Aspyr Media and 2K today put out a rather large update to Civilization VI, the June 2019 for Gathering Storm adds in some new features and comes with plenty of balance changes and bug fixes.

  • Free and open source software is being sold commercially in the Microsoft Store

    Ever since Microsoft, one of the original and squarely proprietary tech giants, pivoted from software to services some years back, its relationship with free and open source software seems to have improved.

    For one thing, Microsoft replies on such things as open source flagship Linux for its cloud infrastructure. And the company also made a series of moves indicating it was now a better, gentler version of its old self, seeking not only to use open source software but also contribute back to it.

  • The Best Free Photoshop Alternatives

    GIMP, or GNU Image Manipulation Program, is more than just a photo editor. It also has sophisticated image manipulation tools, which will appeal to pros as well as regular uers.  

    GIMP has the expected assortment of basic features, including cropping and straightening to adjusting brightness, contrast, and color balance to name a few. Plus it has more advanced tools, like layers, content rescaling, and animation, plus the ability to add blur, noise, and distortion, among other effects.

    In fact GIMP offers most of the features that Photoshop has, even if it is missing things like other color modes besides RGB and the capability for non-destructive editing. Even better, GIMP’s interface is very customizable, and its features are expandable. Since it is open source, GIMP community members can create plugins, and they often do, sharing them to the rest of the community for free.

  • Nvidia and ARM join forces to eighty-six x86 supercomputers

    Team Green, which has a thing for making lunchbox-sized supercomputers, will be making its CUDA-X AI and high-performance computing (HPC) software work nicely with the ARM ecosystem, which means a load of processors based on CPUs and architectures coming out of the Cambridge chip designer.

  • When the Atari ST Was the Future of Computing

    The Atari 520ST was Atari's first 16-bit salvo in the personal computer wars of the 1980s. A

  • New vulnerabilities may let hackers remotely SACK Linux and FreeBSD systems
  • Linux Kernel Bug Knocks PCs, IoT Gadgets and More Offline
  • Oregon prisons ban dozens of technology and programming books over security concerns

    “There’s absolutely nothing in there that would pose a security risk. The books are written for consumers - people at home,” he said. “There’s very little about there in networking and there’s certainly nothing about breaking into networks.”

    Prison officials said the bans aren’t arbitrary or a blanket prohibition on technology-focused books. Instead, they’re a reflection of the resources available to inmates.

    “We allow our folks in custody to have a lot of access to computers,” said Kelly Raths, the department’s central mailroom administrator.

    Inmates in Oregon facilities can have USB drives, allowing them to store college papers or legal pleadings and transport them between computers, Raths said. Classrooms inside prisons have networked computers.

  • Slimbook Launches New "Apollo" Linux PC, First Beta for Service Pack 5 of SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Is Out, NVIDIA Binary Drivers for Ubuntu Growing Stale, DragonFly BSD v 5.6 Released and Qt v. 5.12.4 Now Available

    Slimbook, the Spanish Linux computer company, just unveiled a brand-new all-in-one Linux PC called the "Apollo". It has a 23.6 inch IPS LED display with a 1920x1080 resolution, and a choice between an Intel i5-8500 and i7-8700 processors. It comes with up to 32GB of RAM and integrated Intel UHD 630 4K graphics. Pricing starts at $799.

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux 5.3 Could Finally See FSGSBASE - Performance Improvements Back To Ivybridge

    The FSGSBASE instruction set has been present on Intel processors going back to Ivy Bridge processors and while there have been Linux kernel patches for this feature going on for years, it looks like with the Linux 5.3 kernel cycle is this support for merging. Making us eager for this support is the prospect of better performance, especially for context switching workloads that already have been suffering as a result of recent CPU mitigations. 

    The FSGSBASE instructions allow for reading/writing FS/GS BASE from any privilege. But the short story is there should be performance benefits from FSGSBASE in context switching thanks to skipping an MSR write for GSBASE. User-space programs like Java are also expected to benefit in being able to avoid system calls for editing the FS/GS BASE.

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium and thunderbird), Debian (php-horde-form, pyxdg, thunderbird, and znc), Fedora (containernetworking-plugins, mediawiki, and podman), openSUSE (chromium), Red Hat (bind, chromium-browser, and flash-plugin), SUSE (docker, glibc, gstreamer-0_10-plugins-base, gstreamer-plugins-base, postgresql10, sqlite3, and thunderbird), and Ubuntu (firefox).

  • Self-Audits | Roadmap to Securing Your Infrastructure

    As you can see, the security audit can be tailored based on any security controls you have/need. NIST provides the 800-53A (“A” is for audit or assessment) and provides different file formats to use. This is a great place to start creating your own audit document.

    To sum it up, embracing self-audits and the benefit they provide will reduce risk and save time. The longer a security control remains in a failed state, the more time threats have to exploit a vulnerability. Protect yourself and add security by prioritizing audits.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Calendar management dialog, archiving task lists, Every Detail Matters on Settings (Sprint 2)

    This was a long-time request, and something that I myself was missing when using To Do. Since it fits well with the product vision of the app, there was nothing preventing it from being implemented.

    Selecting this feature to be implemented during the week was a great choice – the task was self contained, had a clear end, and was just difficult just enough to be challenging but not more than that.

    However, I found a few issues with the implementation, and want to use the next round to polish the feature. Using the entire week to polish the feature might be too much, but it will give me some time to really make it great.

  • Open Source Answer To Dropbox And OneDrive: Meet Frank Karlitschek

    During the OpenSUSE Conference in Nurnberg (German), Nextcloud founder Frank Karlitschek appeared on “Let’s Talk’ to talk about the importance of fully open source file sync and storage solutions for enterprise customers. As one of the early contributors to desktop Linux he also talked about the reasons why desktop Linux has not succeeded.

  • Load-Bearing Internet People

    Some maintainers for critical software operate from a niche at a university or a government agency that supports their effort. There might be a few who are independently wealthy.

  • Robert Helmer: Vectiv and the Browser Monoculture

    So, so tired of the "hot take" that having a single browser engine implementation is good, and there is no value to having multiple implementations of a standard. I have a little story to tell about this.

    In the late 90s, I worked for a company called Vectiv. There isn't much info on the web (the name has been used by other companies in the meantime), this old press release is one of the few I can find.

    Vectiv was a web-based service for commercial real estate departments doing site selection. This was pretty revolutionary at the time, as the state-of-the-art for most of these was to buy a bunch of paper maps and put them up on the walls, using push-pins to keep track of current and possible store locations.

    The story of Vectiv is interesting on its own, but the relevant bit to this story is that it was written for and tested exclusively in IE 5.5 for Windows, as was the style at the time. The once-dominant Netscape browser had plummeted to negligible market share, and was struggling to rewrite Netscape 6 to be based on the open-source Mozilla Suite.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Educational Operating Systems: What Are They? [Ed: Seems like an old article. Plagiarism? Some of the named distros no longer exist.]

    To start with our list, let’s talk about one of the more popular educational operating systems, EduBuntu. Does the name sound familiar, well this OS is a variation of the popular Windows alternative, Ubuntu. It’s built on the reliable Linux system and is supported by a strong Linux community.

    The software was built from kids aged 6 to 18. The system was built in collaboration with Educators around the world to ensure that the system serves its purpose as a great education source for kids. The system is built for teachers in mind as well as you don’t need a lot of technical knowledge to set it up in your computer lab or PC.

    Edubuntu comes packed with a number of useful education programs such as the KDE Edutainment application suite. What we love about this OS is that there is no need to reformat your PC if it’s already running Ubuntu. You can simply turn the Ubuntu software into Edubuntu through a series of steps.

  • 10 Best Free Human Resource Management Software

    It wasn’t too long ago that we published an article on the best open source accounting software for Linux. Today, we’re concentrating on software that’ll enable you to manage your Human Resources efficiently.

    Human resource management is difficult irrespective of whether you’re running a small or large business. Most HR tools require a subscription plan or one-time fee but there are a good number of alternatives that are available at little to no cost.

    As I usually do, here is my list of the best HR management software and they are all free.

  • Rosanne DiMesio is Conservancy's New Technical Bookkeeper

    We're excited to announce that we've hired Rosanne DiMesio to be our new Technical Bookkeeper. Rosanne is a longtime volunteer with the Wine project ( which was one of Conservancy's founding member projects) where she focuses her efforts on making things easier for users. She is also an Outreachy (also a Conservancy project) graduate who completed her internship working with Wine on improving their Applications Database (AppDB). Rosanne has done many different things during her career, including working as an English teacher and doing tech support for emergency response services. She brings her passion for free software and her care for new free software users to the role at Conservancy.

    "Rosanne has been an incredible force for good within the Wine project. I am delighted to know that my fellow Conservancy project members are going to get the benefit of her organization and insight; this is a huge win for Conservancy." says Jeremy White, a member of the leadership committee for the Wine project and CEO of CodeWeavers.

  • Doom Remake 4 shuts down due to cease and desist from Zenimax [Ed: GPL compliance]
  • Open hardware for musicians and music lovers: Headphone, amps, and more

    The world is full of great open source music players, but why stop at using open source just to play music? You can also use open source hardware to make music. All of the instruments described in this article are certified by the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA). That means you are free to build upon them, remix them, or do anything else with them.

  • Apple Joins Open Source Organization CNCF

    It’s well known that Apple not only uses but also contributes to many open source projects. You may not know but Siri, the virtual assistant of Apple, is powered by Apache Mesos.

    Apple heavily contributes to the open source projects they use. Unlike many other companies, Apple doesn’t like to talk much about it.

    The first time I saw Apple booth at any Open Source conference was at KubeCon in Seattle last year.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Navigating your filesystem in the Linux terminal
  • Install and enable ssh server on Centos 7
  • GSoC 2019 – Week 2 with the Titler Tool

    In the last week, I gained progress with the QML rendering library (see the code here)

    It is doing what it is supposed to do – it renders an input QML file to output frames of a specified format and renders it as quick as possible (with QQuickRenderControl). If you want to test it out – there is CLI access to it through an executable (which is one of the things I’ve been working in the last week) for the library in the test directory here (make sure you read the READMEs along the way!)

    So let’s try to understand what really happens at the core of the library i.e. the rendering part.

    To render QML, the obvious approach is to take ‘screenshots’ of each frame using a grab() method which would grab all the pixels at each instant of time and then render it – not only is this darned slow and expensive, it is also not possible to render at a custom frame rate that way.

  • Mathpix’s Snip Coverts Screenshots to LaTeX Formulas

    Mathpix writes: “Take a screenshot of math and paste the LaTeX into your editor, all with a single keyboard shortcut.” For macOS, Windows and Ubuntu.

  • Making Kubernetes Work Like Linux: Weaveworks COO

    He gave the example of Linux. Everyone understands how to deploy, monitor, manage and look after Linux distributions. But in the Kubernetes world, nothing is standardized. People do things with their own hand-built tools. Everyone’s building their own house in their own way. “What we are trying to do is provide a standardized workflow for how to deploy, configure, monitor, update and look after Kubernetes. What we are doing is providing a standard set of workflows to work with any Kubernetes and any sets of applications,” he said.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Resilience Is Futile | LINUX Unplugged 305

    Is Resilient Linux truly an indestructible distro? Or is this our toughest distro challenge yet?

    Plus why openSUSE is looking at a renaming, and if we’d pay for Firefox Premium.

  • Chrome OS 75 for enterprise brings Linux container VPN, PIN code for printing and more

    While consumers await Chrome OS 75 to drop this week, enterprises got an early look as the platform has already been updated. There aren’t a large number of enterprise-centric features or improvements, but the ones that did make the cut are useful for work environments, such as expanded VPN support.

  • Google's New Graphics Driver Developer Flips On UBWC For Freedreno

    Rob Clark, the longtime leader of the Freedreno driver initiative providing open-source 3D graphics for Qualcomm Adreno hardware and who just recently jumped to Google to continue driver work, is using his new Chromium.org email address for flipping on UBWC in this driver.

    UBWC is the Universal Bandwidth Compression feature of the Adreno hardware. Fritz Koenig of Google back in March contributed the initial code for this feature to reduce memory bandwidth via internal buffer compression. This helps in potential DDR memory power savings and also possible performance implications.

  • More AMDGPU Radeon Graphics Code Is Getting Ready For Linux 5.3

    While eagerly looking out for the Navi/RDNA enablement for the upcoming Radeon RX 5700 / RX 5700XT graphics cards, which should be out soon, in the mean time some other work-in-progress code has been queued as additional material that will make it for the Linux 5.3 cycle.

    AMDGPU DRM maintainer Alex Deucher of AMD today pushed the latest batch of changes to their 5.3 work-in-progress area, which is on top of the earlier rounds of changes.

  • How to Enable Fractional Scaling in Ubuntu 19.04

    In this short guide I show you how to unlock experimental fractional scaling on Ubuntu 19.04 for both Wayland and Xorg sessions.

    Why is this a big deal, though?

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • With Purism Products, You Are in Control

    From its beginning, Purism’s focus has been on building products that respect and protect your privacy, security and freedom. I’ve written about how these three concepts are interdependent before. While Purism is somewhat unique in focusing on all three of these concepts at once, it isn’t the only company that builds products aimed at protecting privacy, security or even freedom. In fact, each of these areas are multibillion-dollar industries.

    Security is a huge industry today, and it continues to grow, with companies releasing new products all the time–products they claim will protect you. Privacy is also hot topic right now, with many companies making sure they include “privacy” in their marketing. There is also an entire industry around products built on free software–even Microsoft recently pivoted over to supporting software freedom in its products.

    Even with all these companies focusing on the same topics, Purism stands apart from the crowd. How? In our approach. Most other companies build products that coincidentally put them, the vendor, in control. From the beginning, Purism has designed all its products to empower the user, not the vendor. All of our products show this approach–and this post will highlight some of our user-empowerment design decisions.

  • Rugged, Kaby Lake NVR computer has eight GbE ports with PoE

    Axiomtek’s fanless, Linux-ready “eBOX671-517-FL” industrial NVR computer provides 6th or 7th Gen Core CPUs, 8x PoE-enabled GbE ports, 2x SATA slots, and 4x mini-PCIe slots.

    Axiomtek has launched a rugged industrial computer for network video recorder (NVR) applications including security surveillance, optical inspection, and edge computing. The eBOX671-517-FL can connect up to 8x IP cameras via its Power-over-Ethernet capable Gigabit Ethernet ports with 802.3af/802.3at support at up to 90W.

  • Knowage Renews Sponsorship in Support of Open Source and Open Source Initiative

    Knowage, the open source suite for modern Business Analytics, combining traditional and big data sources into valuable and meaningful information, has renewed their sponsorship of the the Open Source Initiative® (OSI).  Knowage (formerly SpagoBI) has a 14-years history of open source collaboration, where individuals and companies work together to meet the latest analytical needs, including collaboration with current OSI Affiliate Members Eclipse Foundation, OW2, and Engineering Group- one of the world's leading specialist providers of services, software development and digital platforms that support both public and private companies or organizations through digital transformation.

    Powered by a strong international open source community, and released under AGPL3, Knowage code is freely accessible on GitHub.

  • Akademy-es 2019 talks announced!

    Akademy-es 2019 will be happening this June 28-30 in Vigo.

  • Quick start: Profiling local builds of Firefox for Android and GeckoView_example

    A noteworthy item in there is "--with-java-bin-path". I've had trouble on Ubuntu with the system default Java not being the right version. This helps.

    Note that if you're profiling, you really want to be doing a release build. The behaviour of release is different from an optimized build.

    If you're debuging, you probably need --enable-debug. For details of how to debug, see GeckoView Debugging Native Code in Android Studio.

  • Next steps in privacy-preserving Telemetry with Prio

    In late 2018 Mozilla conducted an experiment to collect browser Telemetry data with Prio, a privacy-preserving data collection system developed by Stanford Professor Dan Boneh and PhD candidate Henry Corrigan-Gibbs. That experiment was a success: it allowed us to validate that our Prio data collections were correct, efficient, and integrated well with our analysis pipeline. Today, we want to let you know about our next steps in testing data collection with Prio.

    As part of Content Blocking, Firefox will soon include default protections against tracking. Our protections are built on top of a blocklist of known trackers. We expect trackers to react to our protections, and in some cases attempt to work around them. We can monitor how our blocklists are applied in Firefox to detect these workarounds.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Pearl Linux 8 PDE Run Through
  • Blind SQL Injection Techniques Tutorial

    SQL Injection is a type of database attack in which an attacker tries to steal information from a web application’s database. This can even result to remote code execution depending upon web application environment and database version.

    SQL Injection happens due to poor sanitization of user input. If you take input from user in some coding language (PHP, ASP.NET) and pass it directly to server’s database without applying any filter on the input, this can result to SQL Injection vulnerability.

    For example, the following PHP code is vulnerable to SQL Injection attack because its directly passing the user input to database. Attacker can craft its own malicious database query to extract data from database.

  • New HiddenWasp Linux Malware Focused Solely on Achieving Targeted Remote Control [Ed: The media likes to frame this as a "Linux" issue even though it targets something else in order to take control of the underlying OS. Facts don't matter these days.]
  • Pi-hole

    With the recent move by Google to disable the ad-blockers in Chrome (except for Enterprise level customers[1]), the interest is sure to increase for methods of protection against the ad-delivered malware, other than browser plug-ins. I'm sure Barracuda will make some coin if it's still around. And on the free software side, someone is making an all-in-one package for Raspberry Pi, called "Pi-hole". It works by screwing with DNS, which is actually an impressive demonstration of what an attack on DNS can do.

    An obvious problem with Pi-hole is what happens to laptops when they are outside of the home site protection. I suppose one could devise a clone of Pi-hole that plugs into the dnsmasq. Every Fedora system runs one, because NM needs it in order to suppord the correct lookup on VPNs. The most valuable part of Pi-hole is the blocklist, the rest is just scripting.

  • Google Cloud, Gmail, other services hit by massive outage in US Featured

    Google's services have been affected by serious networking issues in the eastern part of the United States, affecting multiple services in Google Cloud, G Suite and YouTube, the company says.

  • How many browser tabs do you usually have open?

    Here's a potentially loaded question: How many browser tabs do you usually have open at one time? Do you have multiple windows, each with multiple tabs? Or are you a minimalist, and only have a couple of tabs open at once. Another option is to move a 20-tabbed browser window to a different monitor so that it is out of the way while working on a particular task.

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today's howtos

All Linux, all the time: Supercomputers Top 500

Starting at the top, two IBM-built supercomputers, Summit and Sierra, at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, respectively to the bottom -- a Lenovo Xeon-powered box in China -- all of them run Linux. Linux supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. In supercomputers, it supports both clusters, such as Summit and Sierra, the most common architecture, and Massively Parallel Processing (MPP), which is used by the number three computer Sunway TaihuLight. When it comes to high-performance computing (HPC), Intel dominates the TOP500 by providing processing power to 95.6% of all systems included on the list. That said, IBM's POWER powers the fastest supercomputers. One supercomputer works its high-speed magic with Arm processors: Sandia Labs' Astra, an HPE design, which uses over 130-thousand Cavium ThunderX2 cores. And, what do all these processors run? Linux, of course. . 133 systems of the Top 500 supercomputers are using either accelerator or co-processor setups. Of these most are using Nvidia GPUs. And, once more, it's Linux conducting the hardware in a symphony of speed. Read more

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

  • Are DevOps certifications valuable? 10 pros and cons
  • Kubernetes 1.15: Enabling the Workloads
    The last mile for any enterprise IT system is the application. In order to enable those applications to function properly, an entire ecosystem of services, APIs, databases and edge servers must exist. As Carl Sagan once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” To create that IT universe, however, we must have control over its elements. In the Kubernetes universe, the individual solar systems and planets are now Operators, and the fundamental laws of that universe have solidified to the point where civilizations can grow and take root. Discarding the metaphor, we can see this in the introduction of Object Count Quota Support For Custom Resources. In English, this enables administrators to count and limit the number of Kubernetes resources across the broader ecosystem in a given cluster. This means services like Knative, Istio, and even Operators like the CrunchyData PostgreSQL Operator, the MongoDB Operator or the Redis Operator can be controlled via quota using the same mechanisms that standard Kubernetes resources have enjoyed for many releases. That’s great for developers, who can now be limited by certain expectations. It would not benefit the cluster for a bad bit of code to create 30 new PostgreSQL clusters because someone forgot to add a “;” at the end of a line. Call them “guardrails” that protect against unbounded object growth in your etcd database.
  • Red Hat named HPE’s Partner of the Year at HPE Discover 2019
    For more than 19 years, Red Hat has collaborated with HPE to develop, deliver and support trusted solutions that can create value and fuel transformation for customers. Our work together has grown over these nearly two decades and our solutions now include Linux, containers and telecommunications technologies, to name just a few. As a testament to our collaboration, HPE has named Red Hat the Technology Partner of the Year 2019 for Hybrid Cloud Solutions.
  • Demystifying Containers – Part II: Container Runtimes
    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications. Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.
  • Edge > Core > Cloud: Transform the Way You Want
    For more than 25 years, SUSE has been very successful in delivering enterprise-grade Linux to our customers. And as IT infrastructure has shifted and evolved, so have we. For instance, we enabled and supported the move to software-defined data centers as virtualization and containerization technologies became more prevalent and data growth demanded a new approach.
  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud Technology Preview Takes Flight
    We are pleased to announce that as of today we are making a technology preview of a containerized version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud available that will demonstrate a future direction for our product. The lifecycle management for this technology preview is based on an upstream OpenStack project called Airship, which SUSE has been using and contributing to for some time. This follows our open / open policy of upstream first and community involvement.

NSA Back Doors in Windows Causing Chaos While Media is Obsessing Over DoS Linux Bug

  • U.S. Government Announces Critical Warning For Microsoft Windows Users
    The United States Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has gone public with a warning to Microsoft Windows users regarding a critical security vulnerability. By issuing the "update now" warning, CISA has joined the likes of Microsoft itself and the National Security Agency (NSA) in warning Windows users of the danger from the BlueKeep vulnerability. This latest warning, and many would argue the one with most gravitas, comes hot on the heels of Yaniv Balmas, the global head of cyber research at security vendor Check Point, telling me in an interview for SC Magazine UK that "it's now a race against the clock by cyber criminals which makes this vulnerability a ticking cyber bomb." Balmas also predicted that it will only be "a matter of weeks" before attackers started exploiting BlueKeep. The CISA alert appears to confirm this, stating that it has, "coordinated with external stakeholders and determined that Windows 2000 is vulnerable to BlueKeep." That it can confirm a remote code execution on Windows 2000 might not sound too frightening, this is an old operating system after all, it would be unwise to classify this as an exercise in fear, uncertainty and doubt. Until now, the exploits that have been developed, at least those seen in operation, did nothing more than crash the computer. Achieving remote code execution brings the specter of the BlueKeep worm into view as it brings control of infected machines to the attacker.
  • Netflix uncovers SACK Panic vuln that can bork Linux-based systems