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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Open Policy Agent: Cloud-native security and compliance

    Every product or service has a unique way of handling policy and authorization: who-can-do-what and what-can-do-what. In the cloud-native world, authorization and policy are more complex than ever before. As the cloud-native ecosystem evolves, there’s a growing need for DevOps and DevSecOps teams to identify and address security and compliance issues earlier in development and deployment cycles. Businesses need to release software on the order of minutes (instead of months). For this to happen, those security and compliance policies—which in the past were written in PDFs or email—need to be checked and enforced by machines. That way, every few minutes when software goes out the door, it’s obeying all of the necessary policies.

    This problem was at the top of our minds when Teemu Koponen, Torin Sandall, and I founded the Open Policy Agent project (OPA) as a practical solution for the critical security and policy challenges of the cloud-native ecosystem. As the list of OPA’s successful integrations grows—thanks to active involvement by the open source community—the time is right to re-introduce OPA and offer a look at how it addresses business and policy pain points in varied contexts.

  • Eirini: Mapping Code into Containers

    There has been a lot of noise recently about the Project known as Eirini.  I wanted to dig into what this project was in a little more detail.
    If you weren’t already aware, its goal is to allow Cloud Foundry to use any scheduler but it’s really for allowing the workloads to run directly inside Kubernetes without needing separately scheduled Diego cells to run on top of.
    There are many reason that this is a fantastic change, but the first and foremost is that having a scheduler run inside another scheduler is begging for headaches. It works, but there are odd edge cases that lead to split-brain decisions.
    NOTE: There is another project (Quarks) that is working on containerizing the control plane in a way that the entire platform is more portable and requiring significantly less overhead. (As in: you can run Kubernetes, the entire platform, and some work, all on your laptop)
     

  • Wayland Buddies | LINUX Unplugged 315

    We spend our weekend with Wayland, discover new apps to try, tricks to share, and dig into the state of the project.

    Plus System76's new software release, and Fedora's big decision.

  • Kdenlive 19.08 Released with Clip Speed, Project Bin Improvements

    Busy trying to salvage footage from a recent video shoot, I missed the arrival of Kdenlive 19.08, the first major release of this free video editor since its big code revamp earlier this year.

    And what a release it is!

    Kdenlive 19.08 builds on the terrific work featured in the various point releases that have been available since April.

    “This version comes with a big amount of fixes and nifty new features which will lay the groundwork for the 3 point editing system planned for this cycle,” they say in their release announcement.

    Now, 3-point editing isn’t my bag (if you’re a heavy keyboard user, you might want to look into it) so I’m gonna skip that side of things to highlight a couple of other welcome changes to the project bin.

  • LabPlot's Welcome screen and Dataset feature in the finish line

    Hello Everyone! This year's GSoC is coming to its end. Therefore I think that I should let you know what's been done since my last blog post. I would also like to evaluate the progress I managed to make and the goals set up at the beginning of this project.

    As I told you in my last post, my main goal, in this last period, was to clean up, properly document, refactor, optimise the code and make it easier to read, so it would be fit to be brought to the master branch and to be used by the community.

    My next proposition was to search for bugs and fix them, in order to make the implemented features more or less flawless. I can happily state, that I succeeded in this.

  • Distributed Beta Testing Platforms

    Do they exist? Especially as free software? I don’t actually know, but I’ve never seen a free software project use something like what I’ve got in mind.

    That would be: a website where we could add any number of test scenarios.

    People who wanted to help would get an account, make a profile with their hardware and OS listed. And then a couple of weeks before we make a release, we’d release a beta, and the beta testers would login and get randomly one of the test scenarios to test and report on. We’d match the tests to OS and hardware, and for some tests, probably try to get the test executed by multiple testers.

    Frequent participation would lead to badges or something playful like that, they would be able to browse tests, add comments and interact — and we, as developers, we’d get feedback. So many tests executed, so many reported failure or regressions, and we’d be able to improve before the release.

  • GSoC 2019 Final submission

    Since my last blog post the main merge request of my GSoC project has landed and after that I followed up with subsequent bugfixes and also a couple of enhancements to the savestates manager.

  • LXLE 18.04.3 Beta Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at LXLE 18.04.3 Beta.

  • Fedora Update Weeks 31–32

    The branch point also meant that the Change Code Complete deadline was passed. As part of the Go SIG, I was one of the packagers behind the Adopt new Go Packaging Guidelines Change. As mentioned in the last post, this was mostly handled by @eclipseo and the tracker bug was marked complete for it just earlier. I am also behind the Automatic R runtime dependencies Change. As part of this Change, I initiated a mini-rebuild last week of all affected R packages. I will write about that in a separate post. That tracker bug is now Code Complete, though there are a couple FTBFS to fix up.

    With release monitoring working again, that meant a slew of new bug reports about new package versions being available. This happened just last Friday, so I haven’t had much chance to update everything. I did manage to go through almost all the R packages, except for a few with new dependencies. I also updated one or two Go and Python packages as well.

  • Rugged, Kaby Lake-U based IoT gateway offers Linux BSP

    Axiomtek’s Linux-ready, DIN-rail mounted “ICO500-518” IoT gateway runs on 7th Gen Core U-series CPUs and provides swappable SATA, 4x USB 3.0, 2x GbE, 2x mini-PCIe, and 2x “PIM” slots for options including 8x GbE or isolated serial and CANBus.

    Axiomtek announced a compact modular edge gateway with ruggedization features for industrial IoT. Applications for the Intel 7th Gen Kaby Lake-U based ICO500-518 include transportation, public utility, smart building, solar energy, and factory automation.

  • 5 Reasons to Use a VM for Development [Ed: Dice promoting the idea that developers should use Windows and keep GNU/Linux in a VM jail using Microsoft's proprietary tools]

    I started using virtual machines (VMs) on my development PC about six years ago; I was keen to learn Linux, having been a Windows developer since the mid-1990s. At first, I used an old Windows PC and installed a Linux distro on it; but I quickly found out that the distro took up a lot of space, and I needed a KVM switch to manage two different PCs. It was all a bit “fiddly,” which is why I began exploring the potential of VMs.

    Discovering VirtualBox was a godsend, and made things a lot more convenient. Despite all the flak Oracle gets over its databases, MySQL, and Java, Virtual Box remains an excellent and free open-source package.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Chris and Wes React to LINUX Unplugged | Jupiter Extras 3

    Nothing is worse than your past self. So we play old clips of LINUX Unplugged and react.

  • Linux Mint 19.2 "Xfce" overview | Light, simple, efficient

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Linux Mint 19.2 "Xfce" and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • embedded computing mission-critical Linux

    Aitech Defense Systems, Inc. in Chatsworth, Calif., has ported the open-source Linux operating system...

    [...]

    With the combination of the SDK and the SFF's modular expansion design, the Ai-RIO enables users to create custom embedded systems that offer high performance, design flexibility and low-cost development. The embedded computing system is available in both ruggedized military or space-qualified versions.

  • Embedded in San Diego

    Starting tomorrow, Collabora will be exhibiting & speaking at Embedded Linux Conference North America (ELCNA) in San Diego, California. Co-located with the Open Source Summit North America, ELCNA is the premier vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using embedded Linux.

    If you are planning on attending either conference, make sure to stop by our booth to see what our team has been working on! This year, we'll be showcasing how Panfrost, the open source driver for Arm Mali GPUs, turns a RK3399 SoC (in this case, the versatile ROCK Pi 4), into a very attractive platform to try out Wayland on ARM devices.

  • Amazon DocumentDB Speeds Up With Slow Queries Logging

    Amazon continues to add extra supports to its non-relational database store DocumentDB with the addition of slow queries logging.

    Slow queries logging allows user to monitor their slowest queries in the cluster. This helps to improve overall performance of the cluster and the individual query.

    Once the user has enabled a set profiler for the query the system will monitor operations and if any queries run longer than the customer-defined threshold, set at 100ms by default, the system will log their execution time and send an alert to the CloudWatch Logs.

today's howtos and leftover

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Misc
HowTos
  • Overview of Linux system + getting around
  • Rename all files in lower case
  • Install Nginx with Server Blocks (Virtual Hosts) on Debian 10
  • GNOME 3.34 Works Out Refined XWayland Support For X11 Apps Run Under Sudo

    GNOME 3.34 continues to look like an incredibly great release in the performance department as well as for Wayland users.

    Earlier this summer, support was added to GNOME's Mutter to generate an Xauth file and passing it to XWayland when starting. The focus of that Red Hat contribution was for allowing X.Org/X11 applications to be run under XWayland as sudo. Up to this point when using sudo with an X11 app on Wayland, it hasn't worked out but this addition for GNOME 3.34 corrects that behavior.

  • Sonoff S55 Waterproof WiFi Smart Sockets are Offered in Six Regional Variants

    When WiFi smart sockets (aka smart plugs) started to appear a few years ago, they were often only available with either US or China plugs, and users from Europe, UK or other locales...

  • Toybrick TB-RK1808 AI Compute Stick is now Available for $86

    Last May, we wrote about RK1808 AI Compute Stick, a USB stick with Rockchip RK1808 dual-core Cortex-A35 processor also featuring a 3.0 TOPS neural processing unit to accelerate AI workloads...

  • DragonFlyBSD Developing DSynth As Synth Rewrite For Custom Package Building

    Adding to another creation being worked on by DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon, DSynth is a C rewrite of the FreeBSD originating Synth program that serves as a custom package repository builder.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Lands Renoir APU Support In Time For Mesa 19.2

    Just hours ahead of the Mesa 19.2 feature freeze and days after the RadeonSI OpenGL driver added Renoir support, the RADV Vulkan driver has picked up support for this next-gen Zen 2 + Vega APU.

    The support comes down to just eight lines of new code for this new APU rumored to be launching in 2020. While it was hoped that this would be the first APU built on the Zen 2 CPU microarchitecture and with Navi graphics, the open-source Linux driver code drops have all pointed it to be more of a Raven/Vega refresh on the graphics side.

  • DevNation Live: Plumbing Kubernetes builds | Deploy with Tekton

    DevNation Live tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about Tekton, a Kubernetes-native way of defining and running CI/CD, from Kamesh Sampath, Principal Software Engineer at Red Hat.

    The session explores the characteristics of Tekton, which is cloud-native, decoupled, and declarative. This demo-filled session will show how to combine various building blocks of Tekton to build and deploy (Tasks and Pipelines) a Kubernetes application.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Intel Icelake Thunderbolt Support Still Being Squared Away For Linux - Hopefully For 5.4

    Intel Icelake laptops will soon be hitting store shelves and a vast majority of the Linux support has been squared away for many months. Unfortunately one bit still not mainlined is the Thunderbolt support.

    Back in July we wrote about the Icelake Thunderbolt support still not merged yet while Icelake's Gen11 graphics and other new processor features have all been squared away for several kernel releases in ensuring good launch-day support. With Icelake, the Thunderbolt functionality has moved onto the SoC itself (sans the Thunderbolt power delivery) and that's taken additional time for getting the Linux kernel support in order.

  • OBS Studio 24.0 Will Let You Pause While Recording, Other New Options

    For those using OBS Studio for cross-platform live-streaming and screen recording needs, OBS Studio 24.0 is on the way but out first is their release candidate to vet the new features coming into this big update.

  • Kontact and Google Integration Issues

    Lately there were some issues with the Google integration in Kontact which caused that it is no longer possible to add new Google Calendar or Gmail account in Kontact because the log in process will fail. This is due to an oversight on our side which lead to Google blocking Kontact as it did not comply with Google’s policies. We are working on resolving the situation, but it will take a little bit.

    Existing users should not be affected by this - if you already had Google Calendar or Gmail set up in Kontact, the sync should continue to work. It is only new accounts that cannot be created.

    In case of Gmail the problem can mostly be worked around when setting up the IMAP account in KMail by selecting PLAIN authentication1 method in the Advanced tab and using your email and password. You may need to enable Less Secure Applications in your Google account settings in order to be able to log in with regular email address and password.

  • rpminspect-0.3 released

    Released rpminspect-0.3 today with bugs reported and fixed during Flock Budapest 2019.

  • Kevin Fenzi: Flock 2019

    Flock time is upon is! This time in lovely Budapest. As always when flock is in europe, it’s a long flight for me, but otherwise travel was uneventfull: Drive 2 hours to PDX, then PDX to AMS, then a short layover for coffee and stoupwaffles and then AMS to BUD, and finally a taxi ride to the hotel.

    The hotel is quite lovely. It’s right next to the danube river and has a nice view. The AC is working nicely too (it’s quite hot outside here right now). After getting into the hotel yesterday and a quick dinner at a very nice place down the road, I managed to sleep for 10+ hours.

  • Design and Web team summary – 16 August 2019

    This iteration was the Web & design team’s first iteration of the second half of our roadmap cycle, after returning from the mid-cycle roadmap sprint in Toronto 2 weeks ago.

    Priorities have moved around a bit since before the cycle, and we made a good start on the new priorities for the next 3 months.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 592

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 592 for the week of August 11 – 17, 2019. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • KNOB attack: Is my Bluetooth device insecure?

    A recent attack against Bluetooth, called KNOB, has been making waves last week. In essence, it allows an attacker to downgrade the security of a Bluetooth so much that it's possible for the attacker to break the encryption key and spy on all the traffic. The attack is so devastating that some have described it as the "stop using bluetooth" flaw.

    This is my attempt at answering my own lingering questions about "can I still use Bluetooth now?" Disclaimer: I'm not an expert in Bluetooth at all, and just base this analysis on my own (limited) knowledge of the protocol, and some articles (including the paper) I read on the topic.

  • Dear sysadmins: Patch Webmin now – zero-day exploit emerges for potential hijack hole in server control panel

    The bug appears to have been revealed on Saturday, August 10, by Özkan Mustafa Akkuş at DEF CON and to have been made available as an exploit in a module for the Metasploit framework. The Webmin maintainers didn't hear about it until Saturday, August 17, when they noticed people discussing the issue on Twitter and Reddit. The CVE was created Thursday, August 15.

    Webmin has about 215,000 installations, according to a Shodan search (account required), and about 13,000 instances of the particularly vulnerable version 1.890.

    [...]

    According to Cooper, the malicious code was introduced into Webmin and Usermin through the project's build infrastructure. "We're still investigating how and when, but the exploitable code has never existed in our GitHub repositories, so we've rebuilt from git source on new infrastructure," he said.

    In an email to The Register, Cooper said the malicious code – which appeared in the Sourceforge repo but not the GitHub repo – was introduced to Webmin on local package build infrastructure before it reached Sourceforge.

  • Backdoor found in Webmin, a popular web-based utility for managing Unix servers [Ed: No, it is not a backdoor and it's not there by design]

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Warfork Letting Warsow Live On Under Steam

    Going back a decade one of the interesting open-source FPS games of its time was Warsow. Development on Warsow has seemingly been tremulous over the past few years (edit: though the core developer has recently released a new beta) for this Qfusion (Quake 2 code base) engine powered game that started in 2005, but now there is Warfork as a fork of Warsow that is being developed and also available via Steam. 

    Hitting Steam this past week was the release of Warfork for Windows, macOS, and Linux. The game is free to play and with it going up on Steam will hopefully attract new gamers to this shooter title who may not be otherwise following the open-source scene. 

  • KDE sprints in summer heat

    It was great to see many new faces at the Plasma sprint. Most of these new contributors were working on the Plasma and KDE Apps Ui and Ux and we definitely need some new blood in these areas. KDE's Visual Design Group, the VDG, thinned out over the last two years because some leading figures left. But now seeing new talented and motivated people joining as designers and Ux experts I am optimistic that there will be a revival of the golden time of the VDG that brought us Breeze and Plasma 5.

    In regards to technical topics there is always a wide field of different challenges and technologies to combine at a Plasma sprint. From my side I wanted to discuss current topics in KWin but of course not everyone at the sprint is directly working on KWin and some topics require deeper technical knowledge about it. Still there were some fruitful discussions, of course in particular with David, who was the second KWin core contributor present besides me.

    As a direct product of the sprint my work on dma-buf support in KWin and KWayland can be counted. I started work on that at the sprint mostly because it was a feature requested already for quite a long time by Plasma Mobile developers who need it on some of their devices to get them to work. But this should in general improve in our Wayland session the performance and energy consumption on many devices. Like always such larger features need time so I was not able to finish them at the sprint. But last week I landed them.

  • My Free Software Activities in July 2019

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Going Linux #375 · Listener Feedback

    In this episode, we have several questions about accessibility in Linux applications, we discuss a couple of cross-platform office suites that provide a bit better compatibility with Microsoft Office file formats, and we discuss problems and solutions for Ubuntu, Barrier, video and privacy and security. Lastly, we comment on Linux Journal's goodbye.

  • Install Java on Debian 9 Operating System
  • List of Inactive/Discontinued Linux Distributions

    This page provides information about the distributions that are no longer supported or developed starting from 2019 with details.

    This table contains the Linux Distribution Name, Distribution Initial Release Date, Distribution Latest Release Date, Reason for distribution inactive, and Distribution Age.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Writing Kubernetes controllers the wrong way is still useful

    When you try to shoehorn an idea, approach, or code into a situation that's not expecting it, you get surprising and fun results.

    In his Lightning Talk at the 17th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE 17x), "Writing Kubernetes controllers 'the wrong way' is still useful," sysadmin Chris McEniry shares his experience with an out-of-cluster etcd-controller.

    Watch Chris' Lightning Talk to learn more about managing etcd controllers and living to tell the tale.

  • VMware's proposed Pivotal acquisition shows Cloud Foundry's strength

    Abby Kearns, executive director of the Cloud Foundry Foundation, reports that in the soon-to-be-released Cloud Foundry end-user survey, "In just two years, broad deployment of Cloud Foundry has nearly doubled. With 45% of our users describing their Cloud Foundry use as 'broad' (compared to 30% in 2018 and 23% in 2017)."

  • Magnetic Lasso for Krita is here

    I won’t say that I am done with Magnetic Lasso now, but the results are a lot better now to be honest. Take a look at one of the tests that I did,

  • [antiX] swapgs mitigations kernels available

    Latest secure kernels available in the repos for 32 and 64 bit architecture (stretch, buster, testing and sid).

    5.2.8 (64bit and 32 bit pae and non-pae-486)
    4.19.66 (64bit and 32 bit pae and non-pae-486)
    4.9.189 (64 bit and 32 bit pae and non-pae-486)

    Users are strongly advised to upgrade.

  • M5Stack M5StickV is a Tiny AI Camera for Maker Projects

today's leftovers: OpenSUSE Tumbleweed, Fedora Program Management, Security and More

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Misc
  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/33

    Week 2019/33 ‘only’ saw three snapshots being published (3 more were given to openQA but discarded).

  • FPgM report: 2019-33

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. (Just not this week because I will be traveling)

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (freetype, libreoffice, and openjdk-7), Fedora (edk2, mariadb, mariadb-connector-c, mariadb-connector-odbc, python-django, and squirrelmail), Gentoo (chromium, cups, firefox, glibc, kconfig, libarchive, libreoffice, oracle-jdk-bin, polkit, proftpd, sqlite, wget, zeromq, and znc), openSUSE (bzip2, chromium, dosbox, evince, gpg2, icedtea-web, java-11-openjdk, java-1_8_0-openjdk, kconfig, kdelibs4, mariadb, mariadb-connector-c, nodejs8, pdns, polkit, python, subversion, and vlc), Oracle (ghostscript and kernel), Red Hat (mysql:8.0 and subversion:1.10), SUSE (389-ds, libvirt and libvirt-python, and openjpeg2), and Ubuntu (nginx).

  • A compendium of container escapes

    My name is Brandon Edwards, I’m Chief Scientist at Capsule8. Today we’ll be talking about a compendium of container escapes in the podcast. We’ve previously talked about escaping containers and the sorts of vulnerabilities people should be concerned with a while back. In particular we’re discussing how the RunC vulnerability had engendered all this interest, or concern, or almost shock, the trust the people are placing in containers was broken. Oh wow, an escape could happen!

    I think it’s really valuable to be able to communicate and show all the other ways that that sort of thing can happen, either from misconfiguration, or over granting privileges, or providing host mounts into the container, or having kernel vulnerabilities that could somehow compromise any of the elements of the security model of container, which is both fragile and complex.

  • Apollo data graph brings managed federation to enterprises

    Data graph vendor Apollo is aiming to help overcome several obstacles to enterprises using graph databases with its latest Apollo Data Graph Platform update, which became generally available on July 16.

    Among the key new features in the platform are federated management capabilities that enable more scalability across different GraphQL data graph instances. GraphQL is an open source query language for APIs, originally created by Facebook that is used to enable data graph capabilities.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • vBSDCon - Sept 5-7 Reston VA

    The schedule has been added to the website: https://www.vbsdcon.com/schedule/

  • Raspberry Digital Signage donation

    The build of Raspberry Digital Signage you can download from SourceForge is limited is some functionality: if you like this project please donate.

    As a donor, you will have full access to the unrestricted versions of: Raspberry Digital Signage (web-based digital signaging), Raspberry Slideshow (image/video slideshow-based digital signaging) and Raspberry WebKiosk (cheap web kiosking), which can be deployed on how many devices you wish!

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux-maker Red Hat Purchase Adds Risk to Owning IBM Stock

    Amid evolving technologies, IBM has to pivot again to remain relevant. It has attempted this feat by buying Red Hat. Investors are bailing out of the shares as integration of the Linux maker will take time. Given the time lag and the falling profits, owning the stock amounts to a gamble on whether management can successfully absorb Red Hat into the company.

  • FLOSS Weekly 542: Dancer

    Dancer is a web application framework for Perl. It was inspired by Sinatra and was written by Alexis Sukrieh originally.

    It has an intuitive, minimalist, and very expressive syntax: has PSGI support, plugins and its modular design allow for strong scalability: and Dancer depends on as few CPAN modules as possible, making it easy to install.

  • Biometrics of one million people discovered on publicly accessible database

    A biometrics database used by the police, banks and defence contractors has been discovered online unprotected, with the fingerprints and facial recognition scans unencrypted.

    Furthermore, the Biostar 2 database - used as part of security systems for warehouses and offices - also contained user names, passwords and other personal information. And the database was so exposed that data could easily be manipulated, and new accounts with corresponding biometrics added

  • Apple locked me out of its walled garden. It was a nightmare

    I started to realize just how far-reaching the effects of Apple disabling my account were. One of the things I love about Apple’s ecosystem is that I’ve built my media collection on iTunes, and can access it from any of my Apple devices. My partner and I have owned numerous iPods, iPhones, iPads, MacBooks, iMacs, Apple Watches, Apple TVs, and even a HomePod, over the years. Apple plays a big part in my professional life too: I’m the IT manager for Quartz, and we use Apple hardware and publish on Apple platforms.

    But when Apple locked my account, all of my devices became virtually unusable. At first, it seemed like a mild inconvenience, but I soon found out how many apps on my iOS and Mac devices couldn’t be updated, not to mention how I couldn’t download anything new. When I had to take a trip for a family emergency, the JetBlue app wouldn’t let me access my boarding pass, saying I had to update the app to use it. It was the first time I’d flown with a paper boarding pass in years. I couldn’t even pass time on the flight playing Animal Crossing on my phone, because I got a similar error message when I opened the game.

  • VMware says it’s looking to acquire Pivotal

    VMware today confirmed that it is in talks to acquire software development platform Pivotal Software, the service best known for commercializing the open-source Cloud Foundry platform. The proposed transaction would see VMware acquire all outstanding Pivotal Class A stock for $15 per share, a significant markup over Pivotal’s current share price (which unsurprisingly shot up right after the announcement).

  • VMware All Set To Acquire Pivotal
  • rideOS Launches New Devoted Platform to Power the Future of Ridehailing
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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Elementary OS is the latest group to ditch Medium for their own blog

Elementary OS – a Linux distribution (distro) built on top of the large, company-backed giant Ubuntu – is a mom-and-pop store by comparison. But it's also one that's managed to capture the attention of even some seasoned Linux users thanks to its focus on user interface (UI) and even user experience (UX) – something often lacking from the more spartan distros. With their focus on icon and UI themes sometimes suspiciously reminiscent of Apple's interfaces – the Elementary OS team have also earned themselves something of a label of “hipsters” in the community. Hence, their decision some years ago to communicate news about the project by hosting their blog on another largely “hipster” online venue – Medium – was little surprise. What's somewhat surprising is the about-face that the project is now making in leaving Medium for the sake of building their own blog hosted on GitHub Pages – using the static generator Jekyll. Read more

Linux Foundation and Intel: Confidential Computing Consortium, OpenGL 4.6 Support For Mesa 19.2 and More

  • New Cross-Industry Effort to Advance Computational Trust and Security for Next-Generation Cloud and Edge Computing

    The Linux Foundation today announced the intent to form the Confidential Computing Consortium, a community dedicated to defining and accelerating the adoption of confidential computing. Companies committed to this work include Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, Google Cloud, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Swisscom and Tencent. Across industries computing is moving to span multiple environments, from on premises to public cloud to edge. As companies move these workloads to different environments, they need protection controls for sensitive IP and workload data and are increasingly seeking greater assurances and more transparency of these controls. Current approaches in cloud computing address data at rest and in transit but encrypting data in use is considered the third and possibly most challenging step to providing a fully encrypted lifecycle for sensitive data. Confidential computing will enable encrypted data to be processed in memory without exposing it to the rest of the system and reduce exposure for sensitive data and provide greater control and transparency for users.

  • The Linux Foundation, Intel & Co Form The Confidential Computing Consortium

    In kicking off the Open Source Summit that has returned to San Diego, the Linux Foundation has announced the formation of the Confidential Computing Consortium in collaboration with Intel and other companies. The initial batch of companies forming the Confidential Computing Consortium include Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, Google Cloud, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Swisscom, and Tencent. This consortium will focus on providing greater transparency and control over user data, reduce exposure to sensitive data, and other protections by means of open-source tooling and hardware advancements around trusted execution environments.

  • Intel's OpenGL Linux Driver Now Has OpenGL 4.6 Support For Mesa 19.2

    Two years after the OpenGL 4.6 specification was announced, Intel's open-source OpenGL Linux driver is now officially advertising the support after today landing the remaining SPIR-V enablement work. For the better part of the past two years the Intel OpenGL Linux drivers were held up from having GL 4.6 due to the ARB_gl_spirv / ARB_spirv_extensions extensions for better interoperability with Vulkan. But today those extensions are now crossed off the list and OpenGL 4.6 is finally in Mesa core with Intel's i965/Iris drivers being the first.

  • Intel Launches 10th Gen "Comet Lake" Laptop CPUs For Laptops & 2-in-1s

    Earlier this month Intel announced 11 Icelake CPUs for laptops and 2-in1s under their 10th Gen CPU line-up. Today the company announced the 10th Gen Comet Lake CPUs also for 2-in-1s and laptops.

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Joey Hess: releasing two haskell libraries in one day: libmodbus and git-lfs

    The first library is a libmodbus binding in haskell. There are a couple of other haskell modbus libraries, but none that support serial communication out of the box. I've been using a python library to talk to my solar charge controller, but it is not great at dealing with the slightly flakey interface. The libmodbus C library has features that make it more robust, and it also supports fast batched reads. So a haskell interface to it seemed worth starting while I was doing laundry, and then for some reason it seemed worth writing a whole bunch more FFIs that I may never use, so it covers libmodbus fairly extensively. 660 lines of code all told. Writing a good binding to a C library has art to it. I've seen ones that are so close you feel you're writing C and not haskell. On the other hand, some are so far removed from the underlying library that its documentation does not carry over at all. I tried to strike a balance. Same function names so the extensive libmodbus documentation is easy to refer to while using it, but plenty of haskell data types so you won't mix up the parity with the stop bits.

  • Misc Developer News (#49)
    The news are collected on https://wiki.debian.org/DeveloperNews
    Please contribute short news about your work/plans/subproject.
    
    In this issue:
     + Self-service buildd givebacks
     + Removal of the mips architecture
     + Superficial package testing
     + Debian Developers Reference now maintained as ReStructuredText
     + Scope of debian-mentors broadened to help with infrastructure questions
     + Hiding package tracker action items
    
    Self-service buildd givebacks
    -----------------------------
    
     Philipp Kern has created[1] an *experimental* service that allows Debian
     members to perform self-service retries of failed package builds (aka
     give-backs). This service aims to reduce the time it takes for give-back
     requests to be processed, which was done manually by the wanna-build
     admins until now. The service is authenticated using the Debian Single
     Signon[2] service. Debian members are still expected to act responsibly
     when looking at build failures; do your due diligence and try reproducing
     the issue on a porterbox first. Access to this service is logged and logs
     will be audited by the admins.
    
  • Debian Guts Support For Old MIPS CPUs

    Debian developers have decided to remove the 32-bit MIPS big-endian architecture. Debian will continue to maintain MIPSEL and MIPS64EL but the older 32-bit big-endian variant of MIPS will be no more. Debian developers decided to drop the older 32-bit BE support due to it being limited to 2GB of virtual address space and it being one of the remaining holdouts of big endian architectures for Debian. Not to mention, there hasn't been much interest in the older MIPS 32-bit BE target in a while either.

  • Alpha: Self-service buildd givebacks

    Builds on Debian's build farm sometimes fail transiently. Sometimes those failures are legitimate flakes, for instance when an in-progress build happens to exhaust its resources because of other builds on the same machine. Until now, you always needed to mail the buildd, wanna-build admins or the Release Team directly in order to get the builds re-queued. As an alpha trial I implemented self-service givebacks as a web script. As SSO for Debian developers is now a thing, it is trivial to add authentication in a way that a role account can use to act on your behalf. While at work this would all be an RPC service, I figured that a little CGI script would do the job just as well.

  • Linux Mint 19.2 Cinnamon Edition – Ships With Cinnamon 4.2 and Uses Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Package Base

    Linux Mint 19.2 has been released and announced by Linux Mint Project, now available to download which ship with the Cinnamon, Mate and Xfce editions both for both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures. It’s powered by the Linux 4.15 kernel and uses the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS package base, which will be supported for five years until 2023. Linux Mint 19.2 Cinnamon edition features latest version of Cinnamon desktop 4.2 with new features and updates. Although the amount of RAM consumed by Cinnamon largely depends on the video driver, Cinnamon uses significantly less RAM than before. The application menu is faster and it now identifies and distinguishes duplicates. If two applications have the same name, the menu will show more information about them. Scrollbars are now configurable and Nemo file manager support pin file and folder .

  • Jupyter looks to distro-agnostic packaging for the democratisation of installation

    When users of your application range from high school students to expert data scientists, it’s often wise to avoid any assumptions about their system configurations. The Jupyter Notebook is popular with a diverse user base, enabling the creation and sharing of documents containing live code, visualisations, and narrative text. The app uses processes (kernels) to run interactive code in different programming languages and send output back to the user. Filipe Fernandes has a key responsibility for Jupyter packaging and ease of installation. At the 2019 Snapcraft Summit in Montreal, he gave us his impressions of snaps as a tool to improve the experience for all concerned. “I’m a packager and a hacker, and I’m also a Jupyter user. I find Jupyter to be great as a teaching tool. Others use it for data cleaning and analysis, numerical simulation and modelling, or machine learning, for example. One of the strengths of Jupyter is that it is effectively language agnostic. I wanted Jupyter packaging to be similar, distro-agnostic, if you like.” Filipe had heard about snaps a while back, but only really discovered their potential after he received an invitation to the Snapcraft Summit and noticed that Microsoft Visual Studio Code had recently become available as a snap. The ease of use of snaps was a big factor for him. “I like things that just work. I often get hauled in to sort out installation problems for other users – including members of my own family! It’s great to be able to tell them just to use the snap version of an application. It’s like, I snap my fingers and the install problems disappear!”