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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Dave Airlie: crocus misrendering of the week

    The bottom image is crocus vs 965 on top. This only happened on Gen4->5, so Ironlake and GM45 were my test machines. I burned a lot of time trying to work this out. I trimmed the traces down, dumped a stupendous amount of batchbuffers, turned off UBO push constants, dump all the index and vertex buffers, tried some RGBx changes, but nothing was rushing to hit me, except that the vertex shaders produced were different.

    However they were different for many reasons, due to the optimization pipelines the mesa state tracker runs vs the 965 driver. Inputs and UBO loads were in different places so there was a lot of noise in the shaders.

    I ported the trace to a piglit GL application so I could easier hack on the shaders and GL, with that I trimmed it down even further (even if I did burn some time on a misplace */+ typo).

    Using the ported app, I removed all uniform buffer loads and then split the vertex shader in half (it was quite large, but had two chunks). I finally then could spot the difference in the NIR shaders.

  • X.Org Server Adds "Fake Screen FPS" Option

    The X.Org Server has picked up a new "-fakescreenfps" option to help with VNC and other remote display scenarios.

    Currently when any main hardware screen is powered off, the X.Org Server initializes the fake screen to a one second update interval. The X.Org Server will keep to that one second update interval for fake screens even if VNC or other remote viewing software is running, until the physical display is powered on.

  • FluBot malware spreads to Australia

    The FluBot strain of Android banking malware, which was initially observed in Spain in late 2020 before spreading more widely across Europe over the following months, is now targeting Australian banks.

    Once installed, FluBot periodically sends a list of apps installed on the device to one of its command-and-control servers. The server responds with a list of apps the malware should overlay. Upon one of these apps being launched, FluBot immediately displays an overlay on top of the legitimate app. The overlays impersonate the legitimate apps and are designed to collect the victim’s online banking credentials, which are sent to the criminals operating FluBot via the command-and-control server.

  • Bits relating to Alpine security initiatives in July – Ariadne's Space

    Another month has passed, and we’ve gotten a lot of work done. No big announcements to make, but lots of incremental progress, bikeshedding and meetings. We have been laying the ground work for several initiatives in Alpine 3.15, as well as working with other groups to find a path forward on vulnerability information sharing.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Android Microconference Accepted into 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Android Microconference has been accepted into the 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference. The past Android microconferences have been centered around the idea that it was primarily a synchronization point between the Android kernel team and the rest of the community to inform them on what they have been doing. With the help of last year’s focus on the Generic Kernel Image[1] (GKI), this year’s Android microconference will instead be an opportunity to foster a higher level of collaboration between the Android and Linux kernel communities. Discussions will be centered on the goal of ensuring that both the Android and Linux development moves in a lockstep fashion going forward.

  • Vaccines + Masks for Safe In-Person Events – Read About All On-Site Safety Protocols [Ed: Linux Foundation discriminates and is not inclusive. "A vaccine verification app will be used to confirm vaccination status" means that Linux Foundation now mandates surveillance devices with back doors for all attendees. This is antithetical to a lot of Free software; they do not accept paper proof. There are commercial interests in the mix]

    The Linux Foundation is ecstatic to return to in-person events next month; we know how important these face-to-face gatherings are to accelerating collaboration and innovation in the open source community.

    [...]

    As announced previously, in-person attendees will be required to be fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus. A vaccine verification app will be used to confirm vaccination status.

  • Petter Reinholdtsen: Mechanic's words in five languages, English, Norwegian and Northern Sámi editions

    Almost thirty years ago, some forward looking people interested in metal work and Northern Sámi, decided to create a list of words used in Northern Sámi metal work. After almost ten years this resulted in a dictionary database, published as the book "Mekanihkkársánit : Mekanikerord = Mekaanisen alan sanasto = Mechanic's words" in 1999. The story of this work is available from the pen of Svein Lund, one of the leading actors behind this effort. They even got the dictionary approved by the Sámi Parliament of Norway as the recommended metal work words to use.

    Fast forward twenty years, I came across this work when I recently became interested in metal work, and started watching educational and funny videos on the topic, like the ones from mrpete222 and This Old Tony. But they all talk English, but I wanted to know what the tools and techniques they used were called in Norwegian. Trying to track down a good dictionary from English to Norwegian, after much searching, I came across the database of words created almost thirty years ago, with translations into English, Norwegian, Northern Sámi, Swedish and Finnish. This gave me a lot of the Norwegian phrases I had been looking for. To make it easier for the next person trying to track down a good Norwegian dictionary for the metal worker, and because I knew the person behind the database from my Skolelinux / Debian Edu days, I decided to ask if the database could be released to the public without any usage limitations, in other words as a Creative Commons licensed data set. And happily, after consulting with the Sámi Parliament of Norway, the database is now available with the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license from my gitlab repository.

  • Lang team August update

    This week the lang team held its August planning meeting. We normally hold these meetings on the first Wednesday of every month.

    We had a short meeting this month, just planning and scheduling the design meetings for the remainder of the month.

    After each meeting, we post an update (like this one!) with notes and meeting announcements.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: x13binary 1.1.57-1 on CRAN: New Upstream, New M1 Binary

    Christoph and I are please to share that a new release 1.1.57-1 of x13binary, of the X-13ARIMA-SEATS program by the US Census Bureau (with updated upstream release 1.1.57) is now on CRAN.

    The x13binary package takes the pain out of installing X-13ARIMA-SEATS by making it a fully resolved CRAN dependency. For example, when installing the excellent seasonal package by Christoph, then X-13ARIMA-SEATS will get pulled in via the x13binary package and things just work. Just depend on x13binary and on all major OSs supported by R you should have an X-13ARIMA-SEATS binary installed which will be called seamlessly by the higher-level packages such as seasonal or gunsales. With this the full power of the what is likely the world’s most sophisticated deseasonalization and forecasting package is now at your fingertips and the R prompt, just like any other of the 17960+ CRAN packages. You can read more about this (and the seasonal package) in the Journal of Statistical Software paper by Christoph and myself.

    This release brings a new upstream release as well as binaries. We continue to support two Linux flavours (theh standard x86_64 as well as armv7l), windows and for a first time two macOS flavour. In addition to the existing Intel binary we now have a native built using the arm64 “M1” chip (with thanks to Kirill for the assist).

  • [LibreOffice] Tender to implement support for editing and creation of a Dynamic Diagram feature (#202108-02)

    The Document Foundation (TDF) is the charitable entity behind the world’s leading free/libre open source (FLOSS) office suite LibreOffice.

    We are looking for an individual or company to implement support for editing and creation of Dynamic Diagrams.

    The work has to be developed on LibreOffice master, so that it will be released in the next major version.

    The task is to solve the following problem: Our existing “SmartArt” import uses the fallback stream in OOX files (and has some issues). It therefore gives us only the draw shapes that are imported, so we lose the original layout. Additionally, in older file versions we don’t have the cached shapes, and therefore can’t render anything.

    The solution we seek, and as such the scope of this tender, is to have a schema driven diagram layout as a core feature. This should be interoperable with OOX (at least MSO2016) and have suitable extensions for ODF. It should layout interoperability, and allow editing of the underlying data, and selection of a schema.

  • Cinelerra Enters Sparky Linux

    Cinelerra is one of the most advanced, open-source non-linear video editors and compositors for Linux. Turn your Linux box into a complete audio and video production environment.

  • The Brains Behind the Books – Part VIII: Julia Faltenbacher

    My name is Julia, I was born in Bremen. This beautiful old Hanseatic city is situated in the north of Germany, close to the North Sea.

    When I was six years old, my parents and I moved to Rosenheim in Bavaria, which is on the southern end of Germany. Rosenheim is a rather small city, close to the Alps. I consider this my first “experience abroad”, as Bavarian people are very different to the Northern German people. They have a very strong accent and a special dialect.

    It took me years to understand the Bavarian dialect, and I still can’t talk like them. And still, I am learning new Bavarian words I have never heard before.

today's leftovers

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  • Reviewing my first OpenBSD port, and what I'd do differently 10 years later

    The first port I ever sent was Beret, a 2D puzzle-platformer game. I guess even from the beginning I was helping out thfr@ in his #PlayOnBSD project. I cannot find the very first attempt at it, as it seems I linked a tarball from a server that has since gone to the great bitbucket in the sky. So I have the first tarball I posted instead.

  • Exploring how culture and computing intersect
  • Many Interesting Talks On Deck For The X.Org Developers Conference 2021

    The program/schedule for this year's XDC21 X.Org Developers' Conference was posted this week ahead of the event occurring in mid-September. There are many interesting talks about X.Org and beyond, which in recent years largely revolve around Mesa and Wayland.

    The 2021 X.Org Developers Conference is once again being a virtual event given the pandemic. Intel folks are again organizing much of the event as well as Intel being the sole platinum sponsor of the event...

    [...]

    - David Edmundson with KDE will talk about ongoing work and an early proof-of-concept for increasing Wayland robustness so should the compositor crash it doesn't bring down the entire session.

  • Full-Time Open Source

    Adam: Hello, and welcome to Corecursive. I’m Adam Gordon Bell. Each episode someone shares the story of a piece of software being built. Today’s show, How to Quit Your Job and Work on Open Source Full Time. This story has it all, balancing open source work and full-time employment, building up enough supporters and enough savings to leave your job. The hardest part to me which is explaining leaving your job to your significant other and to your family and friends.

    And then, also what do you do if your project succeeds, and then someone forks it and builds a commercial business around it? There’s a lot more as well dealing with hacker news feedback, how to improve upon the C programming language and how to be super ambitious without seeming arrogant. And my guest is this guy.

today's leftovers

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  • Run Every Distro At Once | LINUX Unplugged 417

    Yabba Dabba Distro! Run every major distribution on one native host. How we hijacked a Fedora install and turned it into the ultimate meta Linux box.

    Plus Valve and AMD team up to improve Linux performance and the duct-tape solution holding our server together.

  • Win a $10,000 Thelio Major Workstation!

    The computer and operating system are the most powerful tools in existence. The Launch into Learning season encourages STEM and creative professionals like you to hone their craft, learn a new skill, or make something they’re proud to share.

    This year, we’re empowering one lucky user with a $10,000 Thelio Major workstation. The complete package includes a Launch keyboard, an MX Master 3 wireless mouse, a 27” 1440p IPS display, and a decked-out Thelio Major.

  • U.S. medical entities fall prey to Pysa threat actors, but many haven’t disclosed it – at least, not yet.
  • Damage control: Microsoft deletes all comments under heavily criticized Windows 11 upgrade video
  • C++ Vector Iterators – Linux Hint

    The main iterators in C++ are Input Iterator, Output Iterator, Forward Iterator, Bidirectional Iterator, and Random Access Iterator. Reverse Iterator is not really an iterator; it is an iterator adaptor. There are some variants to iterators, like a constant iterator.

    An iterator is an elaborated pointer. Like a pointer, it points to objects of the same type in memory at different times. All iterators are dereferenceable, except for the output iterator that is dereferenceable only for a set of types. Dereferenceable means the value pointed to by the pointer or iterator can be obtained using the indirection operator, *. An integer can be added to some iterators in the same way, and for the same purpose, the integer would be added to a pointer.

    The questions for this article are: What are these iterators? Which of these iterators are used with the C++ vector? How are these iterators used with the C++ vector? This article answers all these questions in a simplified way. At the end of this article, when all these questions would have been answered, C++ vector iterators will be intuitive and natural (for the reader).

  • Security breaches where working from home is involved are costlier, claims IBM report

    Firms looking to save money by shifting to more flexible ways of working will need to think carefully about IT security and the additional cost of breaches linked to staff working from home.

    That's according to the latest annual "Cost of a Data Breach Report" conducted by Ponemon Institute along with IBM Security, which found that the average total cost of a remote-working data breach was more than $1m higher than cyberattacks where remote working wasn't a factor.

  • IBM Cloud took the evening off – 23 services were hard to provision for eight hours

    IBM cloud has experienced a significant Severity One outage – the rating Big Blue uses to denote the most serious incidents that make resources in its cloud unavailable to customers.

    The impact was indeed severe: IBM stated that users might not be able to access its catalogue of cloudy services or provision affected services.

today's leftovers

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  • The Institute for Computing in Research Announces Portland Cohort

    Exposure to mentors, communities and the varied academic disciplines is a great opportunity for these budding scientists. Bridging the gap between programs like Outreachy (another member project of Conservancy's, Outreachy, which provides internships to historically underrepresented groups in technology), Google Summer of Code and other open source internship options with the academic programs like Research Experience for Undergraduates, the ICR is filling a vital role in connecting FOSS and the academy. Showing students computing tools used in industry and the workflows and day to day experiences of academics doing research. Typically these kind of positions are unpaid and not everyone has the luxury of working unpaid for a summer. It's this kind of equitable thinking that makes the ICR standout to us and why we are pleased to work with them.

  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: How MDN’s autocomplete search works [Ed: Mozilla is already being outsourced to Microsoft proprietary software with NSA-connected keyloggers]

    The code for all of this is in the Yari repo which is the project that builds and previews all of the MDN content. To find the exact code, click into the client/src/search.tsx source code and you’ll find all the code for lazy-loading, searching, preloading, and displaying autocomplete searches.

  • The Linux Desktop That Windows 11 Wishes It Could Be

    The recent announcement of Windows 11 has a lot of Windows users excited. The previews that Microsoft has released reveal a modern and sleek operating system. But many Linux users can't help but notice that Windows 11 seems to be heavily inspired by the KDE Plasma desktop.

  • Linux overview | KDE NEON 20210729

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of KDE NEON 20210729 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Most Reliable Hosting Company Sites in July 2021 [Ed: This is the first time I see GNU/Linux in all the top spots (there's usually at least one BSD in there)]

    In July 2021, dinahosting had the most reliable hosting company site: it responded to all of Netcraft’s requests, with an average connection time of 75ms. dinahosting has appeared in the top 10 table five times in 2021 so far and offers its services from Interxion and Global Switch in Madrid. Customers can choose from a range of cloud and managed solutions as well as register domain names.

    Bigstep, Webair and ServerStack appear in second, third and fourth places respectively. These sites responded to the same number of requests and were separated by average connection time. Bigstep’s bare metal cloud hosting provides the flexibility of cloud hosting without the associated overhead and performance reductions of virtualization. The bare metal offerings are available in data centres in the UK and Romania. Webair offers managed and private cloud services, storage and backup solutions from its eight facilities in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Montreal, London, Paris, Amsterdam and Singapore. ServerStack provides managed and dedicated solutions from its three data centres in North America and Amsterdam.

today's leftovers

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  • Auckland University of Technology choose Koha Library System

    The move away from an overseas vendor product will save the university $100,000 per year from 2022 onwards. The library retains all functionality from the current system and gains a number of other benefits for both students and library staff.

    AUT and Catalyst find their values around openness closely aligned. Catalyst is excited to partner with AUT, where the library team have become champions in the use of open source software. “Adopting Koha allows us to continue our progress in open source – this drives increased flexibility and control of our own destiny. Open source software allows our people to take ownership – the move to Koha will mean increased capacity, capability and satisfaction for our staff. We get to work directly with a huge global community of librarians and developers to improve and extend Koha, including dozens of libraries in New Zealand,” says AUT Manager of Open Library Initiatives, Craig Murdoch.

  • HTTP Security Headers: Why? How? What?

    Initially used for simple metadata, HTTP headers now play an important role in the vast field that web security is.

    Setting up HTTP security headers is the quickest, less expensive, and probably the most effective way to secure a web application today. Here is how.

  • Raspberry Pi ‘WeatherClock’ shows you the hour’s forecast
  • Azul Announces Commercial Support for the Eclipse Temurin OpenJDK Distribution
  • Pegasus and the Threat of Cyberweapons in the Age of Smartphones

    The possible targets not only include journalists and activists, but also government officials. This includes 14 heads of states and governments: three presidents (France’s Emmanuel Macron, Iraq’s Barham Salih and South Africa’s Cyril Ramaphosa), three sitting and seven former prime ministers, and a king (Morocco’s Mohammed VI). The three sitting prime ministers are Pakistan’s Imran Khan, Egypt’s Mostafa Madbouly and Morocco’s Saad-Eddine El Othmani. Among the seven former prime ministers are Lebanon’s Saad Hariri, France’s Édouard Philippe, Algeria’s Noureddine Bedoui and Belgium’s Charles Michel, according to the Washington Post.

    Once the malware is installed on a target’s phone, the spyware not only provides full access to the device’s data but also controls the phone’s microphone and camera. Instead of a device for use by the owner, the phone becomes a device that can be used to spy on them, recording not only telephonic conversations but also in-person conversations, including images of the participants. The collected information and data are then transmitted back to those deploying Pegasus.

today's leftovers

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  • LibreOffice Conference 2021: Announcing the logo!

    In late June, we started a competition to design the logo for our upcoming LibreOffice Conference 2021. We received 22 submissions with many great ideas – thanks to everyone who took part!

  • ESP32-H2 RISC-V WiSoC announced with Zigbee 3, Thread, and Bluetooth LE 5.2 - CNX Software

    Just a few days ago, we noted ESP32-H2 802.15.4 & BLE RISC-V SoC had shown up in the source code, and tried to derive specs and a block diagram from the info seeing it was similar to ESP32-C3, but swapping the WiFi radio for an 802.15.4 radio.

    We don’t need to guess anymore, as Espressif Systems has just announced ESP32-H2 RISC-V WiSoC with support for Zigbee 3.x, Thread 1.x through the 802.15.4 radio, as well as Bluetooth LE 5.2.

  • Express-TL Tiger Lake-H COM Express module offers 8K video, PCIe Gen4 x16 connectivity
  • Where Do Linux Users Buy Games? Meet 5 Different Profiles

    We are back with another little story coming from the data collected in April 2021 regarding Linux Gamers’ habits and perceptions. This time we thought it could be fun to go through the usage of game stores… Namely which game stores are currently used by Linux gamers, and at what frequency.

    [....]

    Where Do Linux Users [License proprietary] Games? Meet 5 Different Profiles https://boilingsteam.com/where-do-linux-users-buy-games-meet-5-different-profiles/

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 136

    Whether GNOME is meant to be used in its default state, why open source doesn’t need to conquer the world to succeed, emulating ancient Windows versions on dirt cheap modern hardware, KDE Korner, and more.

today's leftovers

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  • France recognises open source in its National Plan for Open Science 2021-2024 Permalink

    The French Ministry of Research shared its Second National Plan for Open Science for the years 2021-2024 on 6 July. The Plan foresees several initiatives aimed at increasing the reach of open science principles, and, for the first time, includes open source as a critical component of scientific research that needs to be recognised and supported.

  • Second National Plan for Open Science: Generalising open science in France: 2021-2024

    This second National Plan extends the scope to include source code from research, structures actions promoting data sharing and openness through the creation of the Recherche Data Gouv (Gov Data Research) platform, increases the number of transformative levers available to generalise the practice of open science and is divided up into different disciplines and themes. It is firmly attached to a European-wide vision and, in the context of the French presidency of the European Union, proposes to act in favour of open science being effectively taken into account in both individual and collective assessments for research. This involves initiating a process of sustainable transformation in order to ensure that open science becomes a common and shared practice, encouraged by the whole international ecosystem of higher education, research and innovation.

  • Fortran newsletter: August 2021

    Welcome to the August 2021 edition of the monthly Fortran newsletter. The newsletter comes out at the beginning of every month and details Fortran news from the previous month.

  • Ransomware attacks hit record 300 mn in 1st half of 2021: Report [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Ransomware attacks globally surged in the first half of 2021, with 304.7 million, surpassing 2020's full-year total (304.6 million), says a new report.

    After posting record highs in both April and May, cybersecurity firm SonicWall recorded another new high of 78.4 million ransomware attacks in June 2021 alone.

    The ransomware showed massive year-to-date spikes in the US (185 per cent) and the UK (144 per cent).

  • Will Nvidia’s huge bet on artificial-intelligence chips pay off?

    Now Mr Huang wants to make it broader and deeper still. In September Nvidia confirmed rumours that it was buying Arm, a Britain-based firm that designs zippy and energy-efficient chips for most of the world’s smartphones, for $40bn. The idea is to use Arm’s design prowess to engineer central processing units (CPUs) for data centres and AI uses that would complement Nvidia’s existing strength in specialised chips known as graphics-processing units (GPUs). Given the global reach of Arm and Nvidia, regulators in America, Britain, China and the European Union must all approve the deal. If they do—a considerable “if”, given both firms’ market power in their respective domains—Nvidia’s position in one of computing’s hottest fields would look near-unassailable.

today's leftovers

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  • Nishit Patel: GSoC Project update part II

    While reading the documentation, I came across a bug that was leading to broken links. After some debugging and testing, I was able to fix the bug. It was due to a missing configuration in the documentation engine.

  • PostgreSQL Weekly News - August 1, 2021

    PostgreSQL Weekly News is brought to you this week by David Fetter

  • dav1d 0.9.1 Released With More Optimizations - Particularly For Older CPUs

    Dav1d 0.9.1 was released on Sunday as the newest feature update to this leading open-source CPU-based AV1 video decoder.

    Dav1d 0.9.1 principally benefits those on older CPUs such as processors supporting SSE2 and SSE4 but not the newer AVX-era Intel/AMD CPUs. There are 10-bit optimizations for SSE4, 10 and 12-bit SSSE3 optimizations, and a variety of other improvements to Dav1d's SSE2/SSE4 Assembly. There is also film grain Arm NEON support and other fixes.

  • Arch Reproducible Progress July 2021

    At the end of July, I had some days off and some more time to focus on some unreproducible packages in Arch Linux and get some of the issues resolved. This post goes through the resolved issues by category.

  • AWS adds browser access to its cloudy WorkSpaces desktops – but not for Linux • The Register

    Amazon Web Services has stolen a march on Microsoft's cloud desktop plans by adding browser access to its WorkSpaces desktop-as-a-service offering.

    Browser access will only work for WorkSpaces running Windows. Linux users are out in the cold and AWS hasn't said when or if penguin-powered desktops will get to play. The service uses Amazon's WorkSpaces Streaming Protocol (WSP), which doesn't allow use of graphics-intensive instance types. AWS customers that run WorkSpaces from the Asia Pacific (Mumbai) and GovCloud (US-West) Regions also need not apply.

    For the rest of us, the service means browsers are now approved clients for an AWS WorkSpace – but not without complications. WorkSpaces set up to stream over the PCoIP protocol will work in Chrome or Firefox. WSP WorkSpaces can use any Chromium-based browser.

today's leftovers

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  • Ryujinx (Switch Emulator) Gets The Vulkan Treatment

    By using Vulkan, AMD and Intel users will see a massive performance upgrade, and not only this, but those who are using Intel’s integrated GPU will see a lot less graphical glitches. While those with NVIDIA may not see as big of a difference, according to the June 2021 progress report they will see “a small performance improvement in a few titles.”

  • Apache Month in Review: July 2021

    Welcome to the latest monthly overview of events from the Apache community. Here's a summary of what happened in July...

  • Newsletter 101 - July 2021 news | ReactOS Project

    Hello ReactOS followers! This report covers changes in the project during February-July 2021. And we definitely have some things to highlight!

  • ReactOS "Open-Source Windows" Making Progress On x86_64, Multi-Monitor - Phoronix

    ReactOS as the long-running open-source project striving for Windows ABI compatibility has been making some significant progress this summer on various endeavors.

    ReactOS continues going strong after more than two decades for aspiring to be an open-source drop-in replacement to Windows. The open-source project today published their latest newsletter outlining many of their accomplishments so far this year.

  • Stay involved with Call for Code[Ed: Racist IBM (anti-blacks eugenics company) pretends to be ethical to sell more proprietary software e.g. Watson]

    Once again, the Call for Code community has answered the call. We are so grateful to everyone who helped support the 2021 Global Challenge to address climate change and to all of you who participated in this year’s competition. The societal challenges brought on by climate change continue to be some of the most pressing issues of our time. The Call for Code team extends our sincere appreciation to all of you who have joined the fight and are helping apply technology solutions to make a lasting difference.

    There are multiple ways you can continue to hone your skills and take on the greatest societal issues by contributing to our open source projects.

    [...]

    Join the Call for Code for Racial Justice community in Slack to gain access to experts and collaborators, and get started supporting these initiatives.

  • Red Hat partners with Nutanix to deliver open hybrid multicloud solutions

    Red Hat and Nutanix announced a strategic partnership to enable a solution for building, scaling and managing cloud-native applications on-premises and in hybrid clouds. The collaboration brings together technologies, enabling installation, interoperability and management of Red Hat OpenShift and Red Hat Enterprise Linux with Nutanix Cloud Platform, including Nutanix AOS and AHV.

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Get More of Everything With the "Get New" Button in KDE Plasma

KDE Plasma is a desktop tweaker’s dream come true. You can virtually change every aspect of the desktop, from adding widgets and changing fonts, to trying out over-the-top effects and transformative themes. With most interfaces, you need to know where to look online to find these sorts of tweaks, but KDE spares you the effort. There’s a handy little magic button that delivers the goods right to your desktop. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Dave Airlie: crocus misrendering of the week

    The bottom image is crocus vs 965 on top. This only happened on Gen4->5, so Ironlake and GM45 were my test machines. I burned a lot of time trying to work this out. I trimmed the traces down, dumped a stupendous amount of batchbuffers, turned off UBO push constants, dump all the index and vertex buffers, tried some RGBx changes, but nothing was rushing to hit me, except that the vertex shaders produced were different. However they were different for many reasons, due to the optimization pipelines the mesa state tracker runs vs the 965 driver. Inputs and UBO loads were in different places so there was a lot of noise in the shaders. I ported the trace to a piglit GL application so I could easier hack on the shaders and GL, with that I trimmed it down even further (even if I did burn some time on a misplace */+ typo). Using the ported app, I removed all uniform buffer loads and then split the vertex shader in half (it was quite large, but had two chunks). I finally then could spot the difference in the NIR shaders.

  • X.Org Server Adds "Fake Screen FPS" Option

    The X.Org Server has picked up a new "-fakescreenfps" option to help with VNC and other remote display scenarios. Currently when any main hardware screen is powered off, the X.Org Server initializes the fake screen to a one second update interval. The X.Org Server will keep to that one second update interval for fake screens even if VNC or other remote viewing software is running, until the physical display is powered on.

  • FluBot malware spreads to Australia

    The FluBot strain of Android banking malware, which was initially observed in Spain in late 2020 before spreading more widely across Europe over the following months, is now targeting Australian banks. Once installed, FluBot periodically sends a list of apps installed on the device to one of its command-and-control servers. The server responds with a list of apps the malware should overlay. Upon one of these apps being launched, FluBot immediately displays an overlay on top of the legitimate app. The overlays impersonate the legitimate apps and are designed to collect the victim’s online banking credentials, which are sent to the criminals operating FluBot via the command-and-control server.

  • Bits relating to Alpine security initiatives in July – Ariadne's Space

    Another month has passed, and we’ve gotten a lot of work done. No big announcements to make, but lots of incremental progress, bikeshedding and meetings. We have been laying the ground work for several initiatives in Alpine 3.15, as well as working with other groups to find a path forward on vulnerability information sharing.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Android Microconference Accepted into 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Android Microconference has been accepted into the 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference. The past Android microconferences have been centered around the idea that it was primarily a synchronization point between the Android kernel team and the rest of the community to inform them on what they have been doing. With the help of last year’s focus on the Generic Kernel Image[1] (GKI), this year’s Android microconference will instead be an opportunity to foster a higher level of collaboration between the Android and Linux kernel communities. Discussions will be centered on the goal of ensuring that both the Android and Linux development moves in a lockstep fashion going forward.

  • Vaccines + Masks for Safe In-Person Events – Read About All On-Site Safety Protocols [Ed: Linux Foundation discriminates and is not inclusive. "A vaccine verification app will be used to confirm vaccination status" means that Linux Foundation now mandates surveillance devices with back doors for all attendees. This is antithetical to a lot of Free software; they do not accept paper proof. There are commercial interests in the mix]

    The Linux Foundation is ecstatic to return to in-person events next month; we know how important these face-to-face gatherings are to accelerating collaboration and innovation in the open source community. [...] As announced previously, in-person attendees will be required to be fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus. A vaccine verification app will be used to confirm vaccination status.

  • Petter Reinholdtsen: Mechanic's words in five languages, English, Norwegian and Northern Sámi editions

    Almost thirty years ago, some forward looking people interested in metal work and Northern Sámi, decided to create a list of words used in Northern Sámi metal work. After almost ten years this resulted in a dictionary database, published as the book "Mekanihkkársánit : Mekanikerord = Mekaanisen alan sanasto = Mechanic's words" in 1999. The story of this work is available from the pen of Svein Lund, one of the leading actors behind this effort. They even got the dictionary approved by the Sámi Parliament of Norway as the recommended metal work words to use. Fast forward twenty years, I came across this work when I recently became interested in metal work, and started watching educational and funny videos on the topic, like the ones from mrpete222 and This Old Tony. But they all talk English, but I wanted to know what the tools and techniques they used were called in Norwegian. Trying to track down a good dictionary from English to Norwegian, after much searching, I came across the database of words created almost thirty years ago, with translations into English, Norwegian, Northern Sámi, Swedish and Finnish. This gave me a lot of the Norwegian phrases I had been looking for. To make it easier for the next person trying to track down a good Norwegian dictionary for the metal worker, and because I knew the person behind the database from my Skolelinux / Debian Edu days, I decided to ask if the database could be released to the public without any usage limitations, in other words as a Creative Commons licensed data set. And happily, after consulting with the Sámi Parliament of Norway, the database is now available with the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license from my gitlab repository.

  • Lang team August update

    This week the lang team held its August planning meeting. We normally hold these meetings on the first Wednesday of every month. We had a short meeting this month, just planning and scheduling the design meetings for the remainder of the month. After each meeting, we post an update (like this one!) with notes and meeting announcements.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: x13binary 1.1.57-1 on CRAN: New Upstream, New M1 Binary

    Christoph and I are please to share that a new release 1.1.57-1 of x13binary, of the X-13ARIMA-SEATS program by the US Census Bureau (with updated upstream release 1.1.57) is now on CRAN. The x13binary package takes the pain out of installing X-13ARIMA-SEATS by making it a fully resolved CRAN dependency. For example, when installing the excellent seasonal package by Christoph, then X-13ARIMA-SEATS will get pulled in via the x13binary package and things just work. Just depend on x13binary and on all major OSs supported by R you should have an X-13ARIMA-SEATS binary installed which will be called seamlessly by the higher-level packages such as seasonal or gunsales. With this the full power of the what is likely the world’s most sophisticated deseasonalization and forecasting package is now at your fingertips and the R prompt, just like any other of the 17960+ CRAN packages. You can read more about this (and the seasonal package) in the Journal of Statistical Software paper by Christoph and myself. This release brings a new upstream release as well as binaries. We continue to support two Linux flavours (theh standard x86_64 as well as armv7l), windows and for a first time two macOS flavour. In addition to the existing Intel binary we now have a native built using the arm64 “M1” chip (with thanks to Kirill for the assist).

  • [LibreOffice] Tender to implement support for editing and creation of a Dynamic Diagram feature (#202108-02)

    The Document Foundation (TDF) is the charitable entity behind the world’s leading free/libre open source (FLOSS) office suite LibreOffice. We are looking for an individual or company to implement support for editing and creation of Dynamic Diagrams. The work has to be developed on LibreOffice master, so that it will be released in the next major version. The task is to solve the following problem: Our existing “SmartArt” import uses the fallback stream in OOX files (and has some issues). It therefore gives us only the draw shapes that are imported, so we lose the original layout. Additionally, in older file versions we don’t have the cached shapes, and therefore can’t render anything. The solution we seek, and as such the scope of this tender, is to have a schema driven diagram layout as a core feature. This should be interoperable with OOX (at least MSO2016) and have suitable extensions for ODF. It should layout interoperability, and allow editing of the underlying data, and selection of a schema.

  • Cinelerra Enters Sparky Linux

    Cinelerra is one of the most advanced, open-source non-linear video editors and compositors for Linux. Turn your Linux box into a complete audio and video production environment.

  • The Brains Behind the Books – Part VIII: Julia Faltenbacher

    My name is Julia, I was born in Bremen. This beautiful old Hanseatic city is situated in the north of Germany, close to the North Sea. When I was six years old, my parents and I moved to Rosenheim in Bavaria, which is on the southern end of Germany. Rosenheim is a rather small city, close to the Alps. I consider this my first “experience abroad”, as Bavarian people are very different to the Northern German people. They have a very strong accent and a special dialect. It took me years to understand the Bavarian dialect, and I still can’t talk like them. And still, I am learning new Bavarian words I have never heard before.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers