Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

Python: Leading, Developing for Android and New RCs

  • Leading in the Python community
    Naomi began her career in the Classics; she earned a PhD in Latin and Ancient Greek with a minor in Indo-European Linguistics, as she says, "several decades ago." While teaching Latin at a private school, she began tinkering with computers, learning to code and to take machines apart to do upgrades and repairs. She started working with open source software in 1995 with Yggdrasil Linux and helped launch the Fort Wayne, Indiana, Linux User Group.
  • What’s the Best Language for Android App Developers: Java or Python?
    Few things can be so divisive among developers as their choice of programming languages. Developers will promote one over the other, often touting their chosen language’s purity, speed, elegance, efficiency, power, portability, compatibility or any number of other features. Android app developers are no exception, with many developers divided between using Java or Python to develop their applications. Let’s look at these two languages and see which is best for Android app developers.
  • Python 3.7.4rc1 and 3.6.9rc1 are now available
    Python 3.7.4rc1 and 3.6.9rc1 are now available. 3.7.4rc1 is the release preview of the next maintenance release of Python 3.7, the latest feature release of Python. 3.6.9rc1 is the release preview of the first security-fix release of Python 3.6. Assuming no critical problems are found prior to 2019-06-28, no code changes are planned between these release candidates and the final releases. These release candidates are intended to give you the opportunity to test the new security and bug fixes in 3.7.4 and security fixes in 3.6.9. We strongly encourage you to test your projects and report issues found to bugs.python.org as soon as possible. Please keep in mind that these are preview releases and, thus, their use is not recommended for production environments.

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

Latest From Libinput

  • libinput and tablet proximity handling
    This is merely an update on the current status quo, if you read this post in a year's time some of the details may have changed libinput provides an API to handle graphics tablets, i.e. the tablets that are used by artists. The interface is based around tools, each of which can be in proximity at any time. "Proximity" simply means "in detectable range". libinput promises that any interaction is framed by a proximity in and proximity out event pair, but getting to this turned out to be complicated. libinput has seen a few changes recently here, so let's dig into those. Remember that proverb about seeing what goes into a sausage? Yeah, that.
  • libinput and the Dell Canvas Totem
    We're on the road to he^libinput 1.14 and last week I merged the Dell Canvas Totem support. "Wait, what?" I hear you ask, and "What is that?". Good question - but do pay attention to random press releases more. The Totem (Dell.com) is a round knob that can be placed on the Dell Canvas. Which itself is a pen and touch device, not unlike the Wacom Cintiq range if you're familiar with those (if not, there's always lmgtfy).
  • Libinput 1.14 Will Support Dell's Totem Input Device
    Dell announced the Totem two years ago while the Linux support is finally getting in order. However, there isn't yet any notable applications/tool-kits at least on Linux that support utilizing this specialized input device. Red Hat input expert Peter Hutterer, who also maintains libinput, has blogged about the Totem support addition for the upcoming libinput 1.14. If you are interested in this unique input device, Peter's post has all the interesting technical bits.