Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

ARM32 in Linux and Open Source Hardware Certification

  • ARM32 Page Tables

    As I continue to describe in different postings how the ARM32 start-up sequence works, it becomes necessary to explain in-depth the basic kernel concepts around page tables and how it is implemented on ARM32 platforms. To understand the paging setup, we need to repeat and extend some Linux paging lingo. Some good background is to read Mel Gormans description of the Linux page tables from his book “Understanding the Linux Virtual Memory Manager”. This book was published in 2007 and is based on Mel’s PhD thesis from 2003. Some stuff has happened in the 13 years since then, but the basics still hold. It is necessary to also understand the new layers in the page tables such as the five layers of page tables currently used in the Linux kernel. First a primer: the ARM32 architecture with a classic MMU has 2 levels of page tables and the more recent LPAE (Large Physical Address Extension) MMU has 3 levels of page tables. Only some of the ARMv7 architectures have LPAE, and it is only conditionally enabled, i.e. the machines can also use the classic MMU if they want, they have both. It is not enabled by default on the multi_v7 configuration: your machine has to explicitly turn it on during compilation. The layout is so different that the same binary image can never support both classic and LPAE MMU in the same kernel image.

  • Announcing the Open Source Hardware Certification API – Open Source Hardware Association

    Today we are excited to announce the launch of a read/write API for our Open Source Hardware Certification program. This API will make it easier to apply for certification directly from where you already document your hardware, as well as empower research, visualizations, and explorations of currently certified hardware. OSHWA’s Open Source Hardware Certification program has long been an easy way for creators and users alike to identify hardware that complies with the community definition of open source hardware. Since its creation in 2016, this free program has certified hardware from over 45 countries on every continent except Antarctica. Whenever you see the certification logo on hardware:

LibreOffice: Presentation Size Decreasing and New Presentations About LibreOffice

Games: Monster Prom, Möbius Front '83 and League Of Legends

  • The absurd multiplayer dating sim Monster Prom 2: Monster Camp is out now | GamingOnLinux

    I will admit that the original Monster Prom is something special as it remains as the only dating sim type of game I've enjoyed, and now there's a brand new helping of it out with Monster Prom 2: Monster Camp. The original was an unexpected pleasure for me, as a genre I've rarely been able to enjoy. Let's face it, "In Monster Prom I was rejected even after letting a princess ride me", is not a typical GamingOnLinux headline. Monster Prom 2: Monster Camp was funded thanks to a Kickstarter campaign back in 2019, and it has released as of October 23 along with full Linux support as expected. Developer Beautiful Glitch mentioned how they've pretty much taken all that was tasty from the original, and threw in some spices to make Monster Prom 2: Monster Camp.

  • Möbius Front '83 is a tactical turn-based strategy game from Zachtronics | GamingOnLinux

    Releasing with Linux support on November 5 is Möbius Front '83 latest title from Zachtronics (SpaceChem, Infinifactory, Opus Magnum, Eliza). Unlike most of their previous titles, it's not a puzzle game. They say it's actually a conventional strategy game designed from scratch by the clever minds at Zachtronics, so it will have their own special feel to it. "The year is 1983 and the United States of America must defend itself from an enemy it could have never imagined— an America from an alternate universe that will stop at nothing to seize control of the country’s heartland!"

  • How to play League of Legends on Linux | FOSS Linux

    League Of Legends is a game made into a snap, meaning that the software package can be installed and executed across different Linux distributions. Being among the largest footprints of any game in streaming media communities on platforms like Twitch and YouTube, installing it in your Linux system will be great. For our case, we will install it in Ubuntu distro.

IBM/Red Hat: rpminspect 1.2 and systemd 247-RC1

  • David Cantrell: rpminspect-1.2 released

    rpminspect 1.2 is now available. In addition to four new inspections, a lot of improvements have been made to how the program runs and reports results. [...] A number of improvements are present in this release. The big one is the detection of rebased builds and the reading of the rebaseable list from the rpminspect-data package. A rebase is found when the before and after builds have matching package names but different version and release numbers. If the package name and version are the same but the release number is different, this is considered a maintenance update. This check determines reporting thresholds. For instance, changes in config files may report as VERIFY for a maintenance update but they report as INFO for a rebase. The assumption here is that rebased packages will bring a lot of changes and while rpminspect will find those, we do not want it to alarm as strictly as it would for a maintenance update. When using the -d option to get debugging output, you no longer see the config file settings dumped at the beginning of the output. That output has been moved to the -D/--dump-config option. You may not always want to see that so you now need to specify -D to also get the config file output. Support for SHA-224, SHA-384, and SHA-512 message digests is now present in librpminspect. There is a DEFAULT_MESSAGE_DIGEST macro in constants.h that sets the default the program will use. This is intended to help prepare for changes down the road where the message digest used for various tasks in packaging will change.

  • Systemd 247-RC1 Released With Systemd-OOMD, Systemd-Homed Now Defaults To Btrfs

    The first release candidate of systemd 247 is now available for testing and it's a huge feature release.  This big systemd 247 release is introducing systemd-oomd for out-of-memory daemon handling, systemd-homed now defaults to using Btrfs, there is a new capability with systemd of secure credentials handling, and much more. Below is a look at the highlights for systemd 247:  - The new systemd-oomd service has been added for monitoring resource contention and can kill processes when memory/swap pressure is above the defined limits. For now this is experimental and just enabled in the developer mode.  - Systemd-homed defaults to using the Btrfs file-system when available for creating home directories in LUKS volumes. The DefaultFileSystemType= option for homed.conf remains available for changing off the default/ Btrfs was chosen since it can grow and shrink the file-system online.