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Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: MX Linux 19.1 Run Through, Late Night Linux, Linux Headlines and More

  • MX Linux 19.1 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at MX Linux 19.1.

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 83

    Joe has been playing with a PinePhone for a week and gives an honest appraisal. Plus Will’s simple solution to his Mac woes, switching to Linux and a community crowdfunder in the news, and a packed KDE Korner.

  • 2020-02-17 | Linux Headlines

    Two separate VPN companies have recently open-sourced client software, and updates to some beloved projects.

  • Change Desktop Environments on Linux

    Let's go over what it takes to switch your desktop on Linux change it from KDE, GNOME, XFCE, MATE, Cinnamon, LXQt, etc.

Second Shortwave Beta

Today I can finally announce the second Shortwave Beta release! I planned to release it earlier, but unfortunately the last few weeks were a bit busy for me. Read more

Thanks to Linux, I just installed a pro-level video editor on my Chromebook

We’re constantly looking around for new tricks to make our Chromebooks even more capable than they’ve already become over the past couple of years. Every day, there are fewer use-cases where a Windows or Mac device is a necessity and we truly believe that Chrome OS will eventually offer comparable alternatives to that narrowing space. If there is one product, in particular, that Chrome OS will need to figure out, it’s video editing. Sure, there are great online products like WeVideo for lightweight projects and you can even find some pretty good video editing platforms in the Google Play Store but what we’re talking about is serious, high-octane editing that’s worthy of a Hollywood studio. (Well, a low-budget studio maybe.) Read more

This $200 Laptop Is Like a Chromebook You Can Hack

For some reason, despite the fact that our devices can seemingly do anything with an impressive level of polish, there are folks who want to learn from the tech they use. They want a challenge—and an adventure. I think I’ve learned over the last year or two that I’m one of those people. I primarily like using Hackintoshes despite the fact that the machines are intended for Windows, and I will mess with old pieces of computing history just to see if they uncover new ways of thinking about things. So when I heard about the Pinebook Pro, I was in. Here was a laptop built on the same ARM architecture primarily used for smartphones and internet-of-things devices, and designed to run Linux. Is it for everyone? Maybe not. But, if you love an adventure, you should be excited about what it represents. Read more