Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation for Spying and Security Leftovers

  • The Linux Basis Needs Open-Supply Tech to Tackle Future Pandemics [Ed: Surveillance]

    The Linux Basis, which helps open-source innovation in blockchain tech, launched the Linux Basis Public Well being Initiative (LFPHI) on the finish of July. The LFPHI’s purpose is to advertise using open supply by public well being authorities, which will be scrutinized by anybody, to combat not simply COVID-19 however future pandemics as effectively. Among the many seven core members of the LFPHI are Tencent, Cisco and IBM. The initiative is supporting two publicity notification initiatives, “COVID Shield” and “COVID Green,” with the intention of bettering interoperability throughout initiatives in several jurisdictions.

  • Facebook’s Long History of Open Source Investments Deepens with Platinum-level Linux Foundation Membership [Ed: The Linux Foundation is a voice for malicious surveillance companies that need openwashing]

    From its efforts to reshape computing through open source to its aggressive push to increase internet connectivity around the world, Facebook is a leader in open innovation. Perhaps more important today than ever, Facebook’s focus on democratizing access to technology enhances opportunity and scale for individuals and businesses alike. That’s why we’re so excited to announce the company is joining the Linux Foundation at the highest level. Facebook’s sponsorship of open innovation through the Linux Foundation will help support the largest shared technology investment in history with an estimated $16B in development costs of the world’s 100+ leading open source projects and supports those project communities through governance, events and education. The company is also already the lead contributor of many Linux Foundation-hosted projects, such as Presto, GraphQL, Osquery and ONNX. It has been an active participant in Linux kernel development, employing key developers and maintainers across major kernel subsystems.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (linux-4.19, linux-latest-4.19, and openjdk-8) and Fedora (ark and hylafax+).

  • Google to Microsoft: Nice Windows 10 patch – but it's incomplete

    Google Project Zero (GPZ) is refusing to give Microsoft further extensions on disclosing a Windows 10 authentication bug because it says a patch Microsoft delivered in the August 2020 Patch Tuesday update is incomplete.

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast, Self-Hosted and BSD Now

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Infusing your UX writing with brand personality

    Brand can often be overused as a content term, but it can be overlooked as a content strategy. Plenty of folks rave about building their brand, promoting their company brand, creating brand recognition, and so on. But how many of those people actually consider the vast array of content channels that should be on-brand? Yes, blog posts and other marketing collateral should reflect your brand, but you might be overlooking something else: your product’s user interface (UI). I’m not specifically referring to the colors, logos, and icons (although those brand elements are extremely important). I’m referring to the words in the UI. These words are usually called "microcopy" or "UX copy," and the act of creating them is called "UX writing."

  • Open Data Hub 0.7 adds support for Kubeflow 1.0

    Open Data Hub (ODH) is a blueprint for building an AI-as-a-Service (AIaaS) platform on Red Hat OpenShift 4. Version 0.7 of Open Data Hub includes support for deploying Kubeflow 1.0 on OpenShift, as well as increased component testing on the OpenShift continuous integration (CI) system. This article explores the recent updates.

  • Sysadmin careers: How my team distributes work over holidays, nights, and weekends

    Well, I thought this would be an interesting topic to explore because I'm working in a team most sysadmins probably dream of—we don't work over holidays, nights, or weekends. Our mode of operation dictates that everyone works eight hours a day from Monday to Friday. Office hours are between 6:45 am and 8:00 pm, but most of us keep to the typical workday schedule of 8:00 am to 5:00 pm with an hour for lunch. That means there is no operations team present onsite or even on call during nights, weekends, and holidays. (Full disclosure—we do put in an extra hour here and there, but only for some of the bigger migrations, e.g., a new SAN goes live, or we do a migration of a whole mail system including mailboxes and calendars. Some guys will briefly check-in at night or during the weekend to see if the jobs are still running. But, as a rule, other typical maintenance tasks like release upgrades take place during the usual office hours). Sounds awesome, right? Unfortunately, we're not hiring at the moment. When I tell people that we don't have to work on weekends and holidays and don't have to be on call at night, they usually ask, "but what do you do when something breaks?" So we work 8x5, but our clients need our services to be available 24x7. To make that possible, you have to consider a few important things when it comes to product selection and service design.

  • Boosting manufacturing efficiency and product quality with AI/ML, edge computing and Kubernetes

    The manufacturing industry has consistently used technology to fuel innovation, production optimization and operations. Now, with the combination of edge computing and AI/ML, manufacturers can benefit from bringing processing power closer to data that, when put into action faster, can help to proactively discover of potential errors at the assembly line, help improve product quality, and even reduce potential downtime through predictive maintenance and in the unlikely event of a drop in communications with a central/core site, individual manufacturing plants can continue to operate. [...] To achieve this manufacturing vision, along with the continued digitalization of factories, manufacturers must now take a hard look at their operations and technology to meet these new opportunities. It requires factory systems to mirror the best practices of a modern IT environment based on containers, Kubernetes, agile development, AI/ML and automation. All of these technologies, coincidentally, are components of open hybrid cloud, an IT footprint that can be used to accommodate these manufacturing technologies, from the edge of the network to the factory floor.

  • Michel Alexandre Salim: Breaking out of walled gardens

    I have been progressively getting more and more dissatisfied with the grip Big Tech firms have over our collective lives, and have been gradually pruning my use of proprietary technologies over the past months.

  • Red Hat Offers Certification Exams Online in Response to COVID-19

    With travel and in-person gatherings made difficult by COVID-19, Red Hat is now offering certification testing online - and using a unique solution to deter cheating.

Devices With Linux, Mostly Raspberry Pi

  • Terminal Zero: Building the Ultimate Raspberry Pi Zero Computer

    The new edition has no keyboard in favor of a touchscreen interface. The case is custom designed and no only has a huge selection of ports to access but also additional buttons. The unit is completely wireless, using a LiPo battery for power. There's a small speaker inside but you can also use headphones via a 3.5mm jack.

  • Will This Speed up Your Raspberry Pi Browsing by up to 1200%?

    Puffin manages these incredible speeds because the content is rendered remotely on their encrypted cloud servers. A JavaScript engine is used to pre-process and compress web pages before they arrive at your screen. This can be interpreted as a proxy server by some sites, and may affect the content that is available to you.

  • Odroid H2 as ventilator cooling ventilation airmachine

    finally summer and climate change have both reached Europe and had several weeks of 30 C straight… without ventilation, anything above 30 is just “too much to think” (so maybe the brain CPU also would need active cooling?) of course the user could buy a fan online… or try to use CPU fans to do the job

  • Track your punches with Raspberry Pi
  • Garage Minder

    A Raspberry Pi Zero W is used to open and close the garage door. I did not have a convenient outlet to plug in a power supply for the Pi. So my Pi gets its power from the existing garage opener control wiring for the wall button. Typically, there is 24 volt AC available here, though it may be a lower voltage in older openers. A Buck converter down-regulates this voltage to 5 v DC. A battery allows the Pi to continue when the wall button is momentarily pressed, and the power is shorted out. We need two diodes so that the forward drop (1.4v) stops the 6v battery from continuously discharging into the 5v power supply. The battery is barely used, so it should last for a long time. If an outlet is conveniently available, then a regular 5v micro USB charger can be used.