Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

Exclusive: Zorin OS And Star Labs Team Up To Offer A Beautiful Linux Laptop Experience

It's no secret I'm impressed with Zorin OS 15. The polished and user-friendly distro is worth paying attention to, especially as a gateway for beginners into the world of desktop Linux. In what, until today, would have been a totally unconnected observation, I'm also thrilled that Star Labs has popped up on my radar. The UK-based Linux laptop company has a worthy challenger to the Dell XPS 13, and Star Labs is beginning to make waves in the dedicated Linux hardware space. As someone who appreciates the efforts of both these entities, I'm thrilled to exclusively report that they'll be joining forces. Beginning this Friday June 21 at 3pm UK time, Star Labs will begin offering Zorin OS 15 as a pre-loaded option on their entire range of laptop, which currently consists of the Star LabTop Mk III and Star Lite. Zorin OS compliments existing OS options of Ubuntu and Linux Mint. Read more

The best, until OpenMandriva does better: released OMLx 4.0

Exciting news! Shortly after the release candidate we are very proud to introduce you the fruit of so much work, some visible and much more behind the scenes and under the hood. OpenMandriva Lx is a cutting edge distribution compiled with LLVM/clang, combined with the high level of optimisation used for both code and linking (by enabling LTO, and profile guided optimizations for some key packages where reliable profile data is easy to generate) used in its building. OMLx 4.0 brings a number of major changes since 3.x release... Read more Also: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Released With AMD Zen Optimized Option, Toolchain Updates

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Calendar management dialog, archiving task lists, Every Detail Matters on Settings (Sprint 2)
    This was a long-time request, and something that I myself was missing when using To Do. Since it fits well with the product vision of the app, there was nothing preventing it from being implemented. Selecting this feature to be implemented during the week was a great choice – the task was self contained, had a clear end, and was just difficult just enough to be challenging but not more than that. However, I found a few issues with the implementation, and want to use the next round to polish the feature. Using the entire week to polish the feature might be too much, but it will give me some time to really make it great.
  • Open Source Answer To Dropbox And OneDrive: Meet Frank Karlitschek
    During the OpenSUSE Conference in Nurnberg (German), Nextcloud founder Frank Karlitschek appeared on “Let’s Talk’ to talk about the importance of fully open source file sync and storage solutions for enterprise customers. As one of the early contributors to desktop Linux he also talked about the reasons why desktop Linux has not succeeded.
  • Load-Bearing Internet People
    Some maintainers for critical software operate from a niche at a university or a government agency that supports their effort. There might be a few who are independently wealthy.
  • Robert Helmer: Vectiv and the Browser Monoculture
    So, so tired of the "hot take" that having a single browser engine implementation is good, and there is no value to having multiple implementations of a standard. I have a little story to tell about this. In the late 90s, I worked for a company called Vectiv. There isn't much info on the web (the name has been used by other companies in the meantime), this old press release is one of the few I can find. Vectiv was a web-based service for commercial real estate departments doing site selection. This was pretty revolutionary at the time, as the state-of-the-art for most of these was to buy a bunch of paper maps and put them up on the walls, using push-pins to keep track of current and possible store locations. The story of Vectiv is interesting on its own, but the relevant bit to this story is that it was written for and tested exclusively in IE 5.5 for Windows, as was the style at the time. The once-dominant Netscape browser had plummeted to negligible market share, and was struggling to rewrite Netscape 6 to be based on the open-source Mozilla Suite.