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Sunday, 21 Apr 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New Red Hat FOSS Survey ("The State of Enterprise Open Source") Roy Schestowitz 5 21/04/2019 - 7:07am
Story Nvidia Uses "Open Source" for Marketing of Expensive Hardware Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2019 - 6:52am
Story Introducing Mozilla WebThings Roy Schestowitz 3 21/04/2019 - 6:38am
Story SuperTuxKart 1.0 Release Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2019 - 5:02am
Story The NULL TTY Driver Is Coming To The Linux 5.2 Kernel Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2019 - 4:58am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2019 - 2:37am
Story Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 released Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2019 - 2:28am
Story Skrooge 2.19.0 released Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2019 - 2:21am
Story Pop!_OS 19.04 is here! Roy Schestowitz 2 21/04/2019 - 2:17am
Story Libreoffice vs Apache OpenOffice: how to choose the right free office suite for you Rianne Schestowitz 20/04/2019 - 9:45pm

Nvidia Uses "Open Source" for Marketing of Expensive Hardware

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
OSS
Gaming
  • Nvidia to publish open source version of Quake II RTX

    HEXUS shared the Quake II RTX video as an appendage to the news about real-time raytracing coming to the GTX 1060 or higher, back in March, during the GTC 2019 event. In brief, the video was presented by Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang during the opening keynote of GTC 2019. The demo's real-time ray traced global illumination and reflections, HDR visuals, dynamic direct and indirect lighting effects, mimicked physical material light reflection properties, and volumetric lighting effects were met with rapturous applause by GTC attendees.

  • NVIDIA To Transform Quake II RTX Demo Into An Open Source Retro Gaming Classic

    Applause broke out from the crowd at GTC 2019 when NVIDIA showcased a modded version of Quake II with overhauled graphics featuring real-time ray tracing and HDR visuals. Quake II RTX, as it is called, looks almost like a completely different game than the original version that launched over two decades ago. It was an impressive demo for sure, but NVIDIA has bigger plans for the mod.

    "Our goal is to publish an open source version of Quake II RTX," Principal DevTech Engineer and Quake II RTX's lead programmer, Alexey Panteleev, told AusGamers in an interview.

  • NVIDIA To Release Open Source Version Of The Quake II RTX Demo In The Future

    Last month, during GDC 2019, NVIDIA showed an impressive Quake II RTX demo, which showed how ray tracing can improve even old games, and it seems like players will soon be able to experience it for themselves.

    Speaking with Aus Gamers, Alexey Panteleev, the lead programmer of the Quake II RTX demo, confirmed that an open source version of it will be released in the future.

SuperTuxKart 1.0 Release

Filed under
Gaming
  • SuperTuxKart 1.0 Release

    Yes, if you have followed our development a bit, that might be a bit of a surprise. But we have been asked why we don't call this release 1.0, and the majority of us developers discussed this and decided that indeed this release is a major milestone that deserves the big 1.0 number.

  • SuperTuxKart 1.0 Released For Open-Source Linux Racing

    SuperTuxKart, the open-source racing game inspired by Mario Kart and themed around Linux/Tux, has reached its 1.0 version after being in development the past 12+ years.

    SuperTuxKart 1.0 has been released now that there is networking support for SuperTuxKart for competitive racing across LANs or the Internet. The networking support isn't yet perfect but is quite suitable and has come together nicely in recent months.

The NULL TTY Driver Is Coming To The Linux 5.2 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

While initially some questions were raised over the usefulness and practicality of this driver when it was first proposed on the kernel mailing list, the NULL TTY driver is set to make its maiden voyage to mainline with the upcoming Linux 5.2 kernel cycle.

The NULL TTY driver is intended for use-cases where no console driver is present/enabled as intended or otherwise. For init scripts and programs attempting to access /dev/console, it will error out while attempts like linking the console device to /dev/null will cause issues depending upon usage since it doesn't behave like a TTY.

Read more

Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Netrunner Team is happy to announce the immediate availability of Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 – 64bit ISO.

Read more

Skrooge 2.19.0 released

Filed under
KDE

The Skrooge Team announces the release 2.19.0 version of its popular Personal Finances Manager based on KDE Frameworks.

Read more

Libreoffice vs Apache OpenOffice: how to choose the right free office suite for you

Filed under
LibO
OSS

When it comes to free office software, there are two main choices: LibreOffice and OpenOffice (or, to give it its proper name, Apache OpenOffice). The two are remarkably similar, so how can you choose the right one for you?

First, it's worth thinking carefully about whether you need desktop office software at all. Provided you have an internet connection, Google Docs, Sheets and Slides might offer everything you need, without the need to install anything, and with the extra bonus that everything you create will be automatically saved to the cloud. No more lost documents, or having to email work to yourself.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Plop Linux 19.1 released
  • How do you say SUSE?

    SUSECON 2019 has come and gone and was definitely one for the books. Whether you were able to attend the event in person or not, you can still view plenty of videos and content that was shared at the event.
    One of my favorite videos from the week was “How do you say SUSE” -which comically reminded attendees how to properly say “SUSE.” Don’t quite know exactly how to pronounce SUSE? We’ve got you covered….Broadway musical style.
    The keynote videos from each day are not to be missed as well as the series of amazing music parody videos that have recently been created. One of the major take-a-ways this year was the recent announcement that as of March 15, not only did SUSE become an independent company, we are now the largest independent open source company in the industry.

  • In 2019, Most Linux Distributions Still Aren't Restricting Dmesg Access

    Going back to the late Linux 2.6 kernel days has been the CONFIG_DMESG_RESTRICT (or for the past number of years, renamed to CONFIG_SECURITY_DMESG_RESTRICT) Kconfig option to restrict access to dmesg in the name of security and not allowing unprivileged users from accessing this system log. While it's been brought up from time to time, Linux distributions are still generally allowing any user access to dmesg even though it may contain information that could help bad actors exploit the system.

    The primary motivation of CONFIG_SECURITY_DMESG_RESTRICT and an associated sysctl tunable as well (dmesg_restrict) is for restricting access to dmesg so unprivileged users can't see the syslog to avoid possible kernel memory address exposures among other potentially sensitive information that could be leaked about the kernel to help anyone trying to exploit the system. But even with these options being available for years, most Linux distributions leave dmesg open to any user.

  • Is Email Making Professors Stupid?

     

    I can think of at least three strong arguments for why higher education should be that industry, significantly restructuring its work culture to provide professors more uninterrupted time for thinking and teaching, and require less time on email and administrative duties.

  • What is ZIL anyway?

     

    The Infocom ZIL code dump has kicked off a small whirlwind of news articles and blog posts. A lot of them are somewhat hazy on what ZIL is, and how it relates to MDL, Lisp, Z-code, Inform, and the rest of the Golden-Age IF ecosystem.

    So I'm going to talk a lot about it! With examples. But let's go through in chronological order.

  • Death by PowerPoint: the slide that killed seven people

    Edward Tufte’s full report makes for fascinating reading. Since being released in 1987 PowerPoint has grown exponentially to the point where it is now estimated than thirty million PowerPoint presentations are made every day. Yet, PowerPoint is blamed by academics for killing critical thought. Amazon’s CEO Jeff Bezos has banned it from meetings. Typing text on a screen and reading it out loud does not count as teaching. An audience reading text off the screen does not count as learning. Imagine if the engineers had put up a slide with just: “foam strike more than 600 times bigger than test data.” Maybe NASA would have listened. Maybe they wouldn’t have attempted re-entry. Next time you’re asked to give a talk remember Columbia. Don’t just jump to your laptop and write out slides of text. Think about your message. Don’t let that message be lost amongst text. Death by PowerPoint is a real thing. Sometimes literally.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • State of enterprise open source: 5 telling stats

    For starters, open source plays a big role in three of the biggest intersecting trends in IT right now: Containers, cloud, and DevOps. Each has open source DNA (and each encompasses highly coveted IT talent skill sets). Kubernetes has become the highest-velocity project in open source history. In fact, IT leaders now see open source not only as agile but also as strategic, according to “The State of Enterprise Open Source,” a new report conducted by Illuminas and sponsored by Red Hat, which queried 950 IT leaders worldwide.

    What does that mean in practice for your peers? Is open source now connected to moving the business forward? How does security weigh in?

  • Meet the programmer-turned-drummer-turned-lawyer who's helping open source startups stand their ground against Amazon's cloud amid a 'clash of ideologies'

    She's made a name for herself as one of the top experts in the field, especially in the last year. Companies like MongoDB, Redis Labs, and Confluent turned to Meeker to help them write new, more restrictive licenses that prevent big cloud providers like Amazon Web Services, Alibaba, and Tencent from using their code freely.

    She calls 2018 a "watershed year" for these new licenses, which sparked fierce debate in the open source software community. The companies in question argued that while it's completely legal for the big tech companies to take open source code and resell it as a commercial service for profit, it's not especially fair — especially since Amazon, in particular, is seen as not contributing enough code back to the open source communities in return.

  • Long Lost ‘Zork’ Source Code Uploaded to GitHub, But Few People Understand It

    Using a compiler created by McGrew, the ZIL Facebook group is now testing the code—and it’s working. One user has got all three Zork games to compile. This leaves things open for ZIL enthusiasts to tinker with the code and test it in-real time, packing on additions and modding existing games. But the licenses here are tricky; Scott noted that these were given to him anonymously and “not considered to be under an open license,” he wrote in the repository notes. That’s because Activision owns the IP[sic].

  • Testing metrics thoughts and examples: how to turn lights on and off through MQTT with pytest-play

    In this article I'll share some personal thoughts about test metrics and talk about some technologies and tools playing around a real example: how to turn lights on and off through MQTT collecting test metrics.

    By the way the considerations contained in this article are valid for any system, technology, test strategy and test tools so you can easily integrate your existing automated tests with statsd with a couple of lines of code in any language.

    I will use the pytest-play tool in this example so that even non programmers should be able to play with automation collecting metrics because this tool is based on YAML (this way no classes, functions, threads, imports, no compilation, etc) and if Docker is already no installation is needed. You'll need only a bit of command line knowledge and traces of Python expressions like variables["count"] > 0.

Video/Audio: Battlefield Bad Company 2, Friday Stream and Greybeard's Worst Nightmare

Filed under
Interviews
  • Battlefield Bad Company 2 | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 18.04 | Steam Play

    Battlefield Bad Company 2 running through Steam play.

  • Ang Takes a Punch – The Friday Stream

    A bunch of the crew get together and share a few stories, recap the week, and play a little music.

    This is a beta test of a community live event we are doing on Fridays at 2pm Pacific: http://jblive.tv

  • Video: A Greybeard's Worst Nightmare (Updated)

    Trying to wrap one's head around the paradigm changes happening in the industry can be difficult. Everything is just moving way too fast. Daniel Riek has been giving a talk for a while now entitled, "A Greybeard's Worst Nightmare." Here is a fairly recent iteration of his talk where he does an excellent job of providing both a historical context and a bridge to understanding the revolution and evolution that is happening. Unfortunately a lot of the progress has been coming from black box services provided by proprietary companies who don't see lock-in as a problem. Daniel explains how the benefits that have been gained by adopting free and open source software don't have to be abandoned in an effort to keep up with industry methodology shifts providing the most innovation and value. We can and are keeping up... but there is a LOT to learn.

Software: Librarians, Weblate, DocBook and Firefox

Filed under
Software
  • Tools to Empower Librarians

    Open source software is a popular choice for libraries and librarians, not simply because recent austerity measures in many developed countries have tightened available budgets. The ability to customise the software for a library’s particular needs, the potential for interoperation with other software, and the lack of license restrictions makes open source software attractive.

    Modern libraries need robust, scalable and flexible software to make their collections and services attractive, especially as digital libraries are radically transforming how information is disseminated. There are very few barriers to any library adopting an open source library system.

    To provide an insight into the quality of software available, we have compiled a list of 7 tools that help librarians embrace web technology. The software is a fairly eclectic bunch, so hopefully there will be something of interest for any librarian.

  • Weblate 3.6

    Weblate 3.6 has been released today. It brings rewritten notifications, user data download and several other improvements. It also sets depreciation timeline for Python 2 installations - after April 2020 Weblate will only support Python 3.

  • docbook2mdoc-1.0.0 released

     

    After doing active development on it for about a month, i just released version 1.0.0 of the DocBook to mdoc converter, docbook2mdoc(1). The OpenBSD port was updated, too. In a nutshell, docbook2mdoc was brought from experimental status to an early release that can be considered mostly usable for production, though no doubt there are still many rough edges. That's why i called it 1.0.0 and not 1.1.1.

    Lots of features were added including support for many new DocBook XML elements and for two kinds of file inclusion, formatting was improved in many respects, and several reorganizations were done with respect to internal code structure. The expat library is no longer needed, and no other dependency is required.
     

    See its homepage for all information about the utility and the release notes for details about this release.
     

    Thanks to Stephen Gregoratto for a number of patches and many useful reports.
     

    The rest of this article explains some important design and implementation decisions and mentions some use cases.

  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 57
  • My 20 years of web

    Twenty years ago I resigned from my former job at a financial news wire to pursue a career in San Francisco.  We were transitioning our news service (Jiji Press, a Japanese wire service similar to Reuters) to being a web-based news site.  I had followed the rise and fall of Netscape and the Department of Justice anti-trust case on Microsoft's bundling of IE with Windows.  But what clinched it for me was a Congressional testimony of the Federal Reserve Chairman (the US central bank) about his inability to forecast the potential growth of the Internet.

    Working in the Japanese press at the time gave me a keen interest in international trade.  Prime Minister Hashimoto negotiated with United States Trade Representative Mickey Cantor to enhance trade relations and reduce protectionist tariffs that the countries used to artificially subsidize domestic industries.  Japan was the second largest global economy at the time.  I realized that if I was going to play a role in international trade it was probably going to be in Japan or on the west coast of the US.
     I decided that because Silicon Valley was the location where much of the industry growth in internet technology was happening, that I had to relocate there if I wanted to engage in this industry.  So I packed up all my belongings and moved to San Francisco to start my new career.

The PinePhone Linux Smartphone Dev Kit Can Run Wayland's Weston

Filed under
Gadgets

While on one side of the table is the Purism Librem 5 Linux smartphone on the high-price/high-end side, the Pine64 folks continue working on the PinePhone as a lower-end Linux smartphone. A new video now shows the PinePhone running on Linux 5.0 with Wayland's Weston.

Earlier this week was Purism showing off the state of their software on the Librem 5 developer kit while coincidentally now is a video showing off the PinePhone running on the Linux 5.0 kernel with Wayland's Weston compositor.

Read more

Also: CrickitSnek — snek on the Adafruit Crickit

Jonathan Carter: Debian project leader elections 2019

Filed under
Debian

I mentioned internal turmoil at the beginning of the post, this was because up until a few days before my self-nomination, I’ve been very confident, and consistently so for a very long time, that I never want to run for DPL. The work that I care about and spend most attention on doesn’t at all require me being a DPL. Also, having more responsibility in areas that I’d rather let others take care of sounded a bit daunting. I’d much rather spend time on technical and more general community issues than very specific interpersonal problems or administrative tasks like reading and approving budget proposals, sending out developer certificates, etc. On top of that, I was aware that running for DPL and opening myself like that means that I open myself to a very wide array of critique, that people might put everything I say under a microscope and try to tear it apart, and that running for DPL means being prepared for that.

Despite that turmoil, a small nagging part kept asking the questions “But what if?”, what if I were DPL, what would I do? What would I change? What would I do as DPL that would make Debian better, and better as a DPL than I just could as a normal debian developer? These questions helped form in my head what my platform would look like, why I wanted to run for DPL, and how the rest of my campaign would shaped up. This year is also unique for me compared to previous years in that I will actually have time over the next year to focus on DPL-like activities. That, combined with the plans that were shaping up that I’m very enthusiastic about, convinced me that it’s time to step up and proceed with my self-nomination.

Read more

NVIDIA on LInux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • NVIDIA 418.52.05 Linux Driver Brings Vulkan Ray-Tracing To Non-RTX GPUs

    As we've been expecting from NVIDIA's recent DXR ray-tracing support back-ported to Pascal/Volta GPUs, there's now a NVIDIA Linux driver beta that offers VK_NV_ray_tracing for pre-Turing graphics processors.

    The NVIDIA 418.52.05 beta driver released on Friday now officially supports the company's Vulkan ray-tracing extension going back to GeForce GTX 1000 "Pascal" graphics cards. The line-up going back to the GeForce GTX 1060, including the Volta-based Titan V and Turing GTX 1600 series now has the ability to utilize Vulkan-powered ray-tracing. This is nice for developers though for Linux end-users/gamers there isn't any significant available yet utilizing Vulkan ray-tracing besides a few code samples and some early engine work for allowing the functionality; most of the ray-tracing activity has been on the Windows side and focused on DirectX 12, but hopefully that will change.

  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano - Install Docker Compose

    In our last blogpost NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit - Introduction we digged into the brand-new NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit and we did found out, that Docker 18.06.1-CE is already pre-installed on this great ARM board.

  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano - Upgrade Docker Engine

    In our last blogposts about the NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit - Introduction and NVIDIA Jetson Nano - Install Docker Compose we digged into the brand-new NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit and we know, that Docker 18.06.1-CE is already installed, but…

Pop!_OS 19.04 is here!

Filed under
Ubuntu

It’s spring again! Leaves are budding and updates are blooming for Pop!_OS. Here’s what’s new in Pop!_OS 19.04:

-The Slim Mode option maximizes your screen real estate by reducing the height of the header on application windows
-Dark Mode gives your applications a relaxing ambience for nighttime viewing. Both Dark Mode and Slim Mode can be activated in the Appearance settings menu.

Read more

Also: Pop!_OS 19.04 Run Through

New Features Coming to Debian 10 Buster Release

Filed under
Debian

There is no set release date for Debian 10 Buster. Why is that so? Unlike other distributions, Debian doesn’t do time-based releases. It instead focuses on fixing release-critical bugs. Release-critical bugs are bugs which have either security issues CVE’s or some other critical issues which prevent Debian from releasing.

Debian has four parts in its archive, called Main, contrib, non-free and optional. Of the four, Debian Developers and Release Managers are most concerned that the packages which form the bedrock of the distribution i.e. Main is rock stable. So they make sure that there aren’t any major functional or security issues.

This is necessary because Debian is used as a server in many different environments and people have come to depend on Debian. They also look at upgrade cycles to see nothing breaks for which they look for people to test and see if something breaks while upgrading and inform Debian of the same.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Riccardo Padovani: Responsible disclosure: improper access control in Gitlab private project.

    As I said back in September with regard to a responsible disclosure about Facebook, data access control isn’t easy. While it can sound quite simple (just give access to the authorized entities), it is very difficult, both on a theoretical side (who is an authorized entity? What does authorized mean? And how do we identify an entity?) and on a practical side.

  • Integrating Password and Privilege Management for Unix and Linux Systems[Ed: More spammy pages under the guise of "whitepaper"]

    Unix and Linux build the foundation for most business-critical systems. Thus, they present target-rich environments for cyber-attackers. Privileged Access Management (PAM) helps to mitigate such risks. To succeed, security teams must follow an integrated approach, covering both privilege elevation and centralized management of shared account credentials.

  • How Not to Acknowledge a Data Breach

    My guess is that what Wipro means by “zero-day” is a malicious email attachment that went undetected by all commercial antivirus tools before it infected Wipro employee systems with malware.

  • Facebook stored millions of Instagram passwords in plain text

    Facebook says it stored millions of Instagram users’ passwords in plain text, leaving them exposed to people with access to certain internal systems. The security lapse was first reported last month, but at the time, Facebook said it only happened to “tens of thousands of Instagram users,” whereas the number is now being revised up to “millions.” The issue also affected “hundreds of millions of Facebook Lite users” and “tens of millions of other Facebook users.”

  • Update: Facebook passwords for hundreds of millions of users were exposed to Facebook employees

    Facebook confirmed March 21 that hundreds of millions of user passwords were being stored in a “readable format” within its servers, accessible to internal Facebook employees—including millions more Instagram users than previously thought. Affected users will be notified, Facebook said, so they can change those passwords.

  • Facebook 'unintentionally' uploaded 1.5 million people's email contacts without asking

    This is how it unfolded: a security researcher spotted that Facebook was asking some users to put in their email passwords when they signed up with a new account to verify their identity. Business Insider then experimented with what would happen if you were brave/mad enough to do so and found that a message popped up saying it was "importing" its contacts without having the decency to check that was okay first.

    Apparently, 1.5 million people just accepted this as just one of those things, and the information was then used to build up Facebook's uncanny ability to predict when you know somebody.

  • In new gaffe, Facebook improperly collects email contacts for 1.5 million

    Facebook's privacy gaffes keep coming. On Wednesday, the social media company said it collected the stored email address lists of as many as 1.5 million users without permission. On Thursday, the company said the number of Instagram users affected by a previously reported password storage error was in the "millions," not the "tens of thousands" as previously estimated.

  • Facebook says it 'unintentionally uploaded' 1.5 million people's email contacts without their consent

    Since May 2016, the social-networking company has collected the contact lists of 1.5 million users new to the social network, Business Insider can reveal. The Silicon Valley company said the contact data was "unintentionally uploaded to Facebook," and it is now deleting them.

  • With Nation Distracted by Mueller Report, Facebook Admits Millions of Users' Passwords Affected by Latest Privacy Breach

    On Thursday, Facebook added to a blog post from March 21 to let users know that instead of storing tens of thousands of Instagram passwords, as it had reported last month, the number of users affected by the privacy breach was in the millions. Facebook is the parent company of Instagram.

    "Since this post was published, we discovered additional logs of Instagram passwords being stored in a readable format," wrote Pedro Canahuati, vice president of Engineering, Security and Privacy. "We now estimate that this issue impacted millions of Instagram users. We will be notifying these users as we did the others."

    The stored passwords were found in January during a routine security check, according to Facebook. In March, when the breach was first announced, the company said the passwords were never visible to anyone outside of Facebook.

Kernel: Linux 5.1 and Linux 5.2

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.1 Picking Up Keyboard Mappings For Full-Screen, Toggle Display Keys

    Coming as a late addition to the Linux 5.1 kernel are some long overdue keyboard key mappings for different functionality.

    Linux Input subsystem maintainer Dmitry Torokhov sent in a pull request on Friday of input updates for Linux 5.1. Among the changes are adding of mapping for Expose/Overview, Keyboard Brightness Up/Down/Toggle, Full Screen, and Toggle Display keys within the kernel's generic HID driver.

  • Linux 5.2 Is Introducing The Fieldbus Subsystem

    A new subsystem queued for introduction in the upcoming Linux 5.2 cycle is the Fieldbus Subsystem, which is initially being added to the staging area of the kernel.

    This newest subsystem for the Linux kernel benefits industrial systems. Fieldbus is a set of network protocols for real-time distributed control of automated industrial systems. Fieldbus is used for connecting different systems/components/instruments within industrial environments. Fieldbus is used for connecting facilities ranging from manufacturing plants up to nuclear energy facilities.

  • Panfrost DRM Driver Being Added To Linux 5.2 For Midgard / Bifrost Graphics

    Not only is the longtime Lima DRM driver for Arm Mali 400/450 graphics set to finally premiere with the Linux 5.2 kernel, but the Panfrost DRM driver is also being mainlined for the newer Mali graphics hardware.

    The Panfrost DRM driver is set to be added to the Linux 5.2 kernel. Panfrost is the open-source, reverse-engineered DRM/KMS driver for Arm Mali Midgard and Bifrost graphics processors where as the Lima driver focuses on the 400/450 series.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 released

The Netrunner Team is happy to announce the immediate availability of Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 – 64bit ISO. Read more

Skrooge 2.19.0 released

The Skrooge Team announces the release 2.19.0 version of its popular Personal Finances Manager based on KDE Frameworks. Read more

Libreoffice vs Apache OpenOffice: how to choose the right free office suite for you

When it comes to free office software, there are two main choices: LibreOffice and OpenOffice (or, to give it its proper name, Apache OpenOffice). The two are remarkably similar, so how can you choose the right one for you? First, it's worth thinking carefully about whether you need desktop office software at all. Provided you have an internet connection, Google Docs, Sheets and Slides might offer everything you need, without the need to install anything, and with the extra bonus that everything you create will be automatically saved to the cloud. No more lost documents, or having to email work to yourself. Read more