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Monday, 01 Mar 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Nitrux 1.3.8 Is Here with KDE Plasma 5.21, Support for Linux Kernel 5.11 and Mesa-Git Marius Nestor 2 01/03/2021 - 1:34pm
Story Linux 5.12-rc1 Rianne Schestowitz 4 01/03/2021 - 1:27pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 01/03/2021 - 12:08pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2021 - 11:47am
Story Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Gen 3 Laptop Is Now Available with Fedora Linux Marius Nestor 01/03/2021 - 11:41am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2021 - 11:14am
Story Free Software and Internet/Standards Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2021 - 11:11am
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2021 - 11:09am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2021 - 10:51am
Story Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Open Source Security, and Linux Action News Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2021 - 10:46am

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to run the Raspberry Pi Os in a virtual machine with Qemu and Kvm - LinuxConfig.org

    Although many operating system are available for the Raspberry Pi, the official one is the Raspberry Pi Os. The operating system is made to run for the arm architecture, and can be easily installed on the SD card which will be used as the main Raspberry Pi storage device. Sometimes we may want to perform some tests or try some applications without having a physical Raspberry Pi machine; in this tutorial we will see how we can create a virtual machine with the Raspberry Pi Os system using Qemu and Kvm (Kernel Virtual Machine).

  • How To Install CyberPanel on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install CyberPanel on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, CyberPanel is one of the first control panels on the market that is both open sources and uses OpenLiteSpeed web server which also packs Email, DNS, and FTP server.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the CyberPanel control panel on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to Install Apache on Ubuntu 20.04 and Host Website

    Apache is an open source and free web server software developed by the Apache Software Foundation. It is officially called Apache HTTP Server. Apache is one of the oldest, cross-platform web servers and it is beginner-friendly.

    In this tutorial, we are going to install Apache version 2 (Apache2) on Ubuntu 20.04. Furthermore, we are going to configure virtual hosts so that more than one website can be hosted on a single server.

  • Source Command in Linux

    The source command is a built-in shell command used to read and execute commands from a file inside the current shell session. The source command is commonly used to retain/change the environment variable in the current shell. In short, sourcing a script will run execute commands in the current shell.

  • How to Install and Use Docker on Ubuntu 20.04 / 20.10

    Docker is a free and open source tool designed to build, deploy, and run applications inside containers. Host on which docker is installed is known docker engine. To work the docker engine smoothly, docker daemon service must always be running. For the applications where multiple containers are used then with the help of docker compose these containers are spin up as a service.

    In this guide, we will demonstrate docker installation on Ubuntu 20.04 /20.10 and will also learn about docker compose installation and its usage.

  • Build a home thermostat with a Raspberry Pi | Opensource.com

    My wife and I moved into a new home in October 2020. As soon as it started getting cold, we realized some shortcomings of the home's older heating system (including one heating zone that was always on). We had Nest thermostats in our previous home, and the current setup was not nearly as convenient. There are multiple thermostats in our house, and some had programmed heating schedules, others had different schedules, some had none at all.

    [...]

    The rest of the "temp" logic is relatively straightforward, but I do want to highlight a piece that I initially missed. My code was running for a few days, and I was working on the hardware, when I noticed that my relays were turning on and off every few seconds. This "short-cycling" isn't necessarily harmful, but it certainly isn't efficient. To avoid that, I added some thresholding to make sure the heat toggles only when it's +/- 0.5C°.

Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Gen 3 Laptop Is Now Available with Fedora Linux

Filed under
News

As you probably already know, Lenovo and Fedora Project announced last year a collaboration to support as many Lenovo ThinkPad laptops and workstations with the Fedora Linux operating system. The initial offering included the ThinkPad P1 Gen2, ThinkPad P53, and ThinkPad X1 Gen8.

As of today, the ThinkPad P1 Gen 3 laptop is included as well in the Fedora partnership program, and you can buy the ultra-thin, stylish, and powerful mobile workstation with Fedora Linux 33 right now from Lenovo’s online store starting at $1,594.42 USD.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Derivation: Peppertown video-game by Congusbongus and StarNavigator

    Thanks to the authors because the game is fully open-source and released on Github under the MIT License [2]. It was made with FLOSS tools (GIMP, VS Code, Phaser, Audacity, git, Tiled) for the MiniJam22 contest [3] and congratz to Congusbongus and StarNavigator for reaching the 2nd place with Peppertown!

  • What security does a default OpenBSD installation offer? (by solene@)

    In a recent blog post, OpenBSD developer Solène Rapenne (solene@) offers an over view of the security features offered by a default OpenBSD installation.

  • Jonathan Dieter: WANPIPE and DAHDI COPR for EL8

    At Spearline, we have a number of servers around the world with Sangoma telephony cards, which use the out-of-tree wanpipe and dahdi kernel modules. As we’ve been migrating our servers from CentOS 6 to SpearlineOS, one of the problems we’ve hit has been the out-of-tree modules don’t compile against the EL8 kernels that we use as the base for SpearlineOS.

    [...]

    If there’s any interest in using the kmod RPMs without the other packages in the COPR, I could look at splitting them into a separate COPR. Please email me if you would like me to do this.

  • Mousepad 0.5.3 Is Released

    The Xfce team has released another version of the extremely plain and simple Mousepad editor. The latest version has a keybinding for resetting the font size and some small fixes. It still lacks absolutely everything beyond the ability to edit text and load and save files.

    [...]

    Mousepad still lacks all the features other simple text-editors like KWrite have beyond the very basic ability to edit text. There is no syntax high-lighting, there is no spell-checker, you can't select text and make it uppercase or lowercase or much else for that matter. It does have a search-and-replace function, and you can load and save files, and you can even have multiple files open in tabs. It does have those things going for it even though it is severely lacking in all other areas.

Free Software and Internet/Standards

Filed under
GNU
  • My Firefox addons as of Firefox 86 (and the current development version)

    I was recently reminded that my most recent entry on what Firefox addons I use is now a bit over a year old. Firefox has had 14 releases since then and it feels the start of January 2020 was an entirely different age, but my Firefox addons have barely changed in the year and a bit since that entry. Since they have updated a very small amount, I'll repeat the whole list just so I have it in one spot for the next time around.

  • Delegation of responsibility for spec finalisation

    Sean is a natural choice for me to delegate this task to. He has been involved in the development of the Gemini specification for longer than anybody other than myself - he was the first person to actually implement the protocol in software, transforming it from the largely academic thought experiment that I had created it as into an actual real world project. He is the developer of a Gemini server (GLV-1.12556) and the admin of a server running it (gemini://gemini.conman.org), which means the details of the specification are of direct and practical relevance to him. He has a long-standing presence in Gopherspace, where the Gemini project was born, and therefore understands and appreciates the value of simple-by-design systems with limited scope. Finally, he has an excellent track record of constructively engaging with the mailing list even at its busiest and most frantic, which certainly can no longer be said for me. For all these reasons I trust him to make good decisions on the basis of careful consideration.

  • A Saturday waste of CPU cycles: building time_t values

    It was bad enough trying to split up all of those date strings into their constituent parts - year, month, day - all of that stuff. But, then when I tried to consistently turn them back into a time_t, I ran into a bunch of other problems. That lead to the post called time handling is garbage. That then lead into the followup post three months later which talked about making time_t values without using mktime and the TZ variable.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Revisiting Html in Java

    Some time ago I wrote a post about creating an embedded dsl for Html in Java. Sadly, it was based on an abuse of lambda name reflection that was later removed from Java.

    I thought I should do a followup because a lot of people still visit the old article. While it’s no longer possible to use lambda parameter names in this way, we can still get fairly close.

  • Use Dash as /bin/sh

    I want startup scripts and everything that has a #!/bin/sh shebang to use the lightest possible shell by default, but I still want my trusty bash in interactive terminal sessions, and for complex scripts.

  • How to Use Group by in Pandas Python – Linux Hint

    Pandas group by function is used for grouping DataFrames objects or columns based on particular conditions or rules. Using the groupby function, the dataset management is easier. However, all related records can be arranged into groups. Using the Pandas library, you can implement the Pandas group by function to group the data according to different kinds of variables. Most developers used three basic techniques for the group by function. First, splitting in which data divide into groups based on some particular conditions. Then, apply certain functions to these groups. In the end, combine the output in the form of data structure.

    In this article, we will walk through the basic uses of a group by function in panda’s python. All commands are executed on the Pycharm editor.

  • gfldex: Undocumented escape hatch

    On my quest to a custom when-statement I did quite a bit of reading. The study of roast and Actions.nqp can lead to great gain in knowledge.

  • Knowing when to look past your code

    At some point, though, your journies will take you to places where things aren’t so clear cut, and you’ll start to gain a sixth sense; a kind of visceral experience that things are not as they have been promised to be.

    A few weeks ago, that sixth sense whispered in my ear: “what if, instead of your cruddy bootloader written in a pre-1.0 systems language for a platform you don’t fully understand, it’s the 20 year-old project with 80,000 commits that’s wrong?” And it was right.

  • Cambalache…
  • C++ Friend Function – Linux Hint

    A function is a block of code that performs a certain task and provides the output. It is mainly used to eliminate repetitive code. In this tutorial, we will look into the friend function in C++ and explain its concept with working examples.

  • mrcal: principled camera calibrations

    In my day job I work with images captured by cameras, using those images to infer something about the geometry of the scene being observed. Naturally, to get good results you need to have a good estimate of the behavior of the lens (the "intrinsics"), and of the relative geometry of the cameras (the "extrinsics"; if there's more than one camera).

    The usual way to do this is to perform a "calibration" procedure to compute the intrinsics and extrinsics, and then to use the resulting "camera model" to process the subsequent images. Wikipedia has an article. And from experience, the most common current toolkit to do this appears to be OpenCV.

    People have been doing this for a while, but for whatever reason the existing tools all suck. They make basic questions like "how much data should I gather for a calibration?" and "how good is this calibration I just computed?" and "how different are these two models?" unanswerable.

Security Leftovers

                   

  • SolarWind, enough with the password already!

                     

                       

    This is a much delayed discussion on the complexity and nuance of the SolarWind hack. The simplistic and wrong messaging from some quarters of the infosec community has resulted in an atrocious misunderstanding of the hack in the public sphere. This has extended into the policy world as these bad takes are treated as cogent analysis.

  •                

  • Microsoft chief's claims on cloud security result in sharp rejoinder

    Comments made by Microsoft president Brad Smith to the US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, which held a hearing on the SolarWinds attacks last week, claiming that there is more security in the cloud than in on-premises servers, have met a tough response from former NSA hacker Jake Williams, who characterised them as having caused more harm to security than the SolarWinds attackers did in the first place.

    Williams, a well-known figure in the infosec community who runs his own private security outfit, Rendition Infosec, said in a tweet: "I've been thinking a LOT about Brad Smith's testimony this week about #SolariGate. He repeatedly implies that if organisations 'just' adopt a cloud first model, they won't experience these sorts of attacks. I called that reckless then, I'm doubling down now."

    [...]

    The SolarWinds attacks were first revealed by the American security firm FireEye on 9 December, when it revealed that its Red Team tools had been stolen. Five days later, FireEye issued a blog post outlining the scale of the attack as known at that stage: a global campaign to compromise public and private sector bodies through corruption of software supply chains, using software that runs on Windows.

    FireEye chief Kevin Mandia also gave testimony to the same committee hearing.

    Williams said Smith should have offered more nuance and caveats in his statements. "With his statements that lacked appropriate nuance and caveats, I predict that Smith has caused more harm to security than the Russians did with #SolariGate in the first place," he said. "Yes, I know that's a strong statement. Yes, I mean it."

    He added: "A lot of leadership who don't know any better heard this testimony and are constructing cloud-first directives as I type this. But they're doing it without understanding the risks and trade-offs. They're doing this without the benefit of creating a strategy first."

    Microsoft has made a number of statements since the attack first came to light, initially denying its products were part of the problem, but later admitting that the attackers had accessed its source code.

  •  

  • The World Economic Forum Warns That 2021 Could Be The Year Of The CyberAttacks

    Klaus Schwab, founder of the World Economic Forum and author of the book "COVID19: The Great Reset", has repeatedly warned about the possibility of devastating large-scale cyberattacks. One of his firmest warnings was given in a heartwarming speech at the WEF-sponsored Cyber Polygon event on July 24th, 2020. The World Economic Forum Centre for Cybersecurity expects the total cost of cyberattacks this year to be $6 trillion.

    [...]

    Running up-to-date free software based solutions such as Linux and *BSD is a good preventative measure against real cyberattacks. It will, sadly, not do much difference if a government decides to cut power or Internet access as part of a global "Great Reset" agenda or because inconvenient mass-demonstrations break out.

  •            

  • Switching back to OpenSSL

                 

                   

    For most users, there should be no noticeable change. If you have any packages installed that are no longer provided by Void, or your system has explicit dependencies on LibreSSL, you will of course need to take action to ensure your system continues to function after the switch.

  •            
      

  • Microsoft patches serious NTFS drive corruption flaw in Windows 10... but there's a catch

    Around a month and a half ago we reported about a serious flaw in Windows 10 that could be exploited to corrupt the contents of an NTFS drive. With Microsoft dawdling in its response, it was down to security researchers from OSR to produce a third-party patch.

    But now Microsoft has stepped up to the plate and, finally, come up with an official fix for the flaw. Sadly, it's not all good news as the fix is not currently available for everyone.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Open Source Security, and Linux Action News

  • LHS Episode #396: M17 Deep Dive

    Hello and welcome to the 396th installment of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode we interview Steve Miller, KC1AWV, one of the major contributors to the M17 amateur radio project. In the interview, Steve tells us the history of the M17 project, how to build and use it, the level of current development and what the future holds. We hope you enjoy this in-depth look at M17 and have a great week.

  • Open Source Security/Josh Bressers: Episode 260 – Dave Jevans tells us what CipherTrace is up to

    Josh and Kurt talk with Dave Jevans CEO of CipherTrace and chairman of the anti-phishing working group about the challenges of keeping track of cryptocurrency in the modern age.

  • Linux Action News 178

    Red Hat is still in damage control mode, a new hacker laptop called Framework makes bold promises, and what Google is spending money on in the Linux kernel.

    Plus why we've recently switched back to Firefox, and more.

Manjaro ARM 21.02 Released with Xfce 4.16 and KDE Plasma 5.21 by Default

Filed under
Linux

Manjaro ARM 21.02 comes two months after Manjaro ARM 20.12 and ships with the latest Xfce 4.16 and KDE Plasma 5.21 desktop environments by default. The previous release shipped with Xfce 4.14 and KDE Plasma 5.20, but after an initial system update you’d get Xfce 4.16 and KDE Plasma 5.21.

If you’ve read my hands-on article of Manjaro ARM on the Raspberry Pi, you would know that the first thing I did was to update the system. I reviewed the Xfce edition, and Xfce 4.16 is a massive update that offers a huge performance boost compared to Xfce 4.14.

Read more

Let's Try LibreOffice Online

Filed under
LibO

You want to try LibreOffice Online for free, right? For your information, it is Writer, Calc, and Impress made accessible on the web browser developed by the infamous Collabora. For a long time, there was barely free service to try but now you and I can try. This article invites you to try it by showing how it looks like. Enjoy!

LibreOffice Online (also called Collabora Office) is the computer office suite program LibreOffice made web based i.e. you access it using web browser without installing anything to your computer. Speaking about the technology, it is integrated with Nextcloud on the server.

Read more

4 open source tools for running a Linux server

Filed under
Linux
OSS

In 2021, there are more reasons why people love Linux than ever before. In this series, I'll share 21 different reasons to use Linux. Here are four open source tools for turning any device into a Linux server.

Sometimes I detect a certain mystique around the idea of a server. Many people, should they have an image in their mind at all, think servers must be big, heavy, rack-mounted machines, carefully maintained by an overly deliberate sysadmin and a group of magical tinker gnomes. Other people envision servers as vaporous clouds that somehow power the internet.

Read more

Linux 5.12-rc1

Filed under
Linux

So two weeks have passed since the 5.11 release, and so - like
clockwork - the merge window for 5.12 has closed, and 5.12-rc1 is out
there for your perusal.

That said, we have now have two unusual merge windows in a row: first
we had the holiday season, and this time around the Portland area had
over a quarter million people without electricity because we had a
winter ice storm that took down thousands of trees, and lots of
electricity lines.

So I was actually without electricity for six days of the merge
window, and was seriously considering just extending the merge window
to get everything done.

As you can tell, I didn't do that. To a large part because people were
actually very good about sending in their pull requests, so by the
time I finally got power back, everything was nicely lined up and I
got things merged up ok.

But partly this is also because 5.12 is a smaller release than some
previous ones - and that wasn't due to the lack of electricity, that
showed independently in the statistics in the linux-next tree. Of
course, "smaller" is all relative, but instead of the 12-13+k commits
we've had the last few releases, linux-next this time only had 10+k
commits lined up. So that helped things a bit.

That said, if my delayed merging caused issues for anybody, please
holler and explain to me, and I'll be flexible during the rc2 week.
But that's _not_ a blanket "I'll take late pulls", that's very much a
"if my delayed merge caused problems for some tree, explain why, and
I'll work with you".

Anyway, on to the actual changes. Even if it was a slightly smaller
merge window than previous ones, it's still big enough that appended
is just my usual merge log, not the full list of the 10982 non-merge
commits by 1500+ people. So it's  more of a flavor of the kinds of
things that have happened rather than a deep dive.

The one thing that perhaps stands out is that this release actually
did a fair amount of historical cleanup. Yes, overall we still have
more new lines than we have removed lines, but we did have some spring
cleaning, removing the legacy OPROFILE support (the user tools have
been using the "perf" interface for years), and removing several
legacy SoC platforms and various drivers that no longer make any
sense.

So even if we more than made up for that with all the _new_ drivers
and code we added, that kind of cleanup is always nice to see.

    Linus

Read more

Also: Linux 5.12-rc1 Released As The "Frozen Wasteland" Kernel

Arduino Intro and Homebrew Hakko 907

Filed under
Hardware
  • What Are the Differences Between Raspberry Pi and Arduino?

    Arduino hails from Italy, and it’s said that it was named after a bar where the developers usually meet to discuss the board. The first Arduino was developed in 2005 and aimed to provide students at Interaction Design Institute Ivrea in Italy with an inexpensive microcontroller board. Its cost and simplicity also piqued the interests of hobbyists and professionals; it wasn’t long until it reached a wider community of makers. Many other varieties of Arduino boards have been created since then. In 2013, around 700,000 Arduino boards were already sold [1].

    Raspberry Pi was born seven years after Arduino when Eben Upton invented a low-cost, modular, the single-board computer that will help improve the programming skills of his students. Like Arduino, it soon reached a wider audience due to its cost and versatility. The first Raspberry Pi board cost only $35, far less expensive than the existing computer boards that usually cost five times higher. The small board got even smaller and cheaper after the Raspberry Pi Foundation created the Raspberry Pi Zero, the smallest Raspberry Pi board to date, which costs only $5. Raspberry Pi progressed rapidly that millions of boards were already created from the initial target of just 10,000 boards years after its first release.

  • Arduino Blog » Homebrew Hakko 907 digital soldering station

    If you want to upgrade your soldering setup without spending a lot of money, then be sure to check out Angelo AKA TechBuilder’s DIY Hakko 907 station.

    This low-cost device features an Arduino Nano to read the iron temperature via an LM358 op-amp, and regulates power to the handle and tip under PWM control using an IRFZ44N MOSFET. A potentiometer is implemented as a variable temperature knob, with the actual and preset temperature displayed on a 16×2 LCD screen, while an LED indicates whether the heating element is active.

First Linux Kernel 5.12 Release Candidate Is Now Available for Public Testing

Filed under
Linux

The merge window that opened with the launch of the Linux 5.11 kernel series two weeks ago is now closed and Linus Torvalds published the first Release Candindate in the upcoming Linux kernel 5.12 series, giving us an early taste of the new features and improvements.

The final release of Linux kernel 5.12 is expected to hit Linux distros sometime this Spring in late April 2021, either on the 18th or the 25th, which depends on how many Release Candidate milestones will be published during the entire development cycle.

Read more

Review: LibreELEC 9.2 and Kodi

Filed under
Reviews

I recently got into a discussion with someone who had purchased a second television for their house and, knowing that I have a fondness for open source and do-it-yourself projects, they asked if there was a suitable alternative to Fire TV. For those not familiar with the device, a Fire TV stick is a small device which looks like a large USB thumb drive and attaches to the HDMI port of a television. The device connects wirelessly to local networks and can be used to stream shows and movies from a variety of services like Netflix and Disney+. The device is operated by a small, dedicated remote control.

I was pretty sure a minimal Linux distribution running on a spare, minimal personal computer or a single-board device like a Raspberry Pi would probably be a suitable replacement. I figured a distribution that ran Kodi could probably do the work, connecting to the TV through an HDMI cable. The user could likely use the Kodi mobile app in place of a dedicated remote control.

For the sake of comparison, I looked up information on the Fire TV stick which was $55 USD if i wanted it in two weeks or $60 if I wanted it in one week. The person I was talking with already had one and knew it was a "plug and play" type device, so the total set up time would be under ten minutes.

I did some on-line shopping in my area and the closest open source style equivalent I could come up with was a Raspberry Pi 3B. The Pi was $47 USD. The Pi included a Wi-Fi option, but no microSD card, no HDMI cable, and no power supply. Adding these items to my tally brought my total up to $78, including tax. In other words, even with a free software solution, it looked like the open source route was going to be slightly more expensive with parts available in my region.

Read more

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Install Papirus Icon Theme on Linux Mint 20 – Linux Hint

    Papirus is a popular and eye-catching icon theme. The Papirus icon theme works with various desktop environments, i.e., Cinnamon, GNOME, Unity, etc., and is available in multiple variants. It can be installed on Linux Mint from the PPA repository, installer script, and Debian package.

  • How to Setup Synology NAS? – Linux Hint

    Synology specializes in Network Attached Storage (NAS) devices and software. Synology NAS devices are easy to use and configure. Its built-in DSM (DiskStation Manager) web app allows you to access and configure the NAS from a web browser. Synology’s management web interface, the DSM web app, is one of the best NAS management tools out there. The DSM web app differentiates the Synology NAS from its competitors.

  • How to Install WireGuard VPN on CentOS 8 – Linux Hint

    WireGuard is a popular point-to-point open-source communication protocol that is used to create a secure and fast Virtual Private Network tunnel. This VPN was designed for use in the Linux Kernel. WireGuard is a lightweight VPN that provides extremely fast speeds to users.

    This article shows you how to install and set up WireGuard on your CentOS 8 system. The installation and setup of WireGuard are much easier than the already-existing VPNs, like OpenVPN, and this is a major reason behind its growing popularity in the Linux community.

  • How to Install Yarn on Linux Mint 20 – Linux Hint

    Yarn is a JavaScript package and dependency management tool that helps users to automate the tasks of installing, updating, removing, and configuring NPM packages. Yarn is an open-source package manager that saves a lot of time for JavaScript programmers because it creates a cache of downloaded packages. Using Yarn, a programmer can easily access and re-use a package without re-downloading it every time.

    This article shows you how to install Yarn on Linux Mint 20.

  • Linux List All IP Addresses on the Interface – Linux Hint

    All the people who belong to the networking background know that an IP address acts as a unique identifier of the devices within a network. Therefore, we must know the IP addresses of the devices within a network to enable smooth network communication. Today’s article will focus on the different methods of listing all the IP addresses on the Interface in Linux Mint 20.

  • Running Docker Containers on Synology NAS – Linux Hint

    Docker is a containerization platform. Docker is used to running lightweight containers on your computer.
    Synology NAS has official support for Docker. Docker can be an alternative to virtual machines. If you don’t have enough memory to run virtual machines on your Synology NAS, you can run Docker containers instead. Docker containers require a very little amount of memory and system resources to run.

    In this article, I will show you how to install and use Docker on Synology NAS. So, let’s get started.

  • How to Enable Automatic Login on Ubuntu 20.04? – Linux Hint

    For Ubuntu’s latest versions, users can enable automatic login for the ease of users. If enabled, then users do not need to type the password whenever they try logging in. If you are the only user of your system, then it is a very useful method for easy access to relevant files.
    In this article, we will analyze the methods of enabling the automatic login on the Ubuntu 20.04 system.

Databases: MySQL and PostgreSQL Technical Manuals (New)

Filed under
Server
  • How to Install MySQL on Linux Mint 20 and Ubuntu 20.04?

    MySQL is an open-source, simple, and relational database that uses SQL (Structured Query Language) to manage and manipulate the data.

  • MySQL Add a Column to Existing Table

    MySQL Database System is a highly scalable database service for creating cloud-native applications. Therefore we have to perform different operations while working on it. The ALTER TABLE declaration is being cast-off to add, remove, or alter columns while working on an already existing table in any schema of MySQL. We’ll teach you exactly how to declare a column to an existing table utilizing the MySQL ADD COLUMN expression in this guide.

  • MySQL Count Matching Records With COUNT

    Data redundancy occurs for a lot of reasons. Several of the complicated duties you should cope with while working with database systems is trying to discover duplicate values. For this purpose, We will be using the COUNT() aggregate method. The COUNT() method returns the sum of rows residing in a specific table. The COUNT() function permits you to sum all rows or only rows matching the condition defined. In this guide, You’ll get to know how to identify duplicate values for one or maybe more MySQL columns using COUNT().

  • MYSQL Import Data from CSV File – Linux Hint

    A CSV or comma-separated value document is a delineated text document that distinguishes values from a comma. Every line is its information record. Each data, parted by commas, comprises one or extra fields. The origin of the title for this document layout is the usage of the comma as a field divider. For sharing information between various programs, such documents are used. For instance, Database and contact administrators also endorse CSV files. The theory is that from one program to a CSV document, you may transfer complex information and afterward import the information in that CSV document to some other program. In this tutorial, we will learn how to import data from a CSV file into MySQL workbench. Let’s get started.

  • MYSQL Find Matching Records with LIKE – Linux Hint

    The MySQL LIKE operator tests if a particular character string resembles the pattern mentioned. We will match a portion of the overall data present in a segment that doesn’t need to match precisely. We will cup tie our keyword with the sequence of the information available in columns by using wildcard query in various combinations. MySQL Wildcards are symbols that help match difficult criteria with search results and have been used in combination with a compare operator called LIKE or a contrast operator called NOT LIKE.

  • MySQL Limit Results Returned With LIMIT – Linux Hint

    You eventually hit the stage where data volume greatly increases when we start to deal with DBMS like MySQL. It is difficult for us to manage and use. MySQL has built-in capabilities that make it easy to handle. In MySQL, the LIMIT clause is being used to cut down the number of rows throughout the result set using the SELECT expression. We will discover how to use the MySQL LIMIT clause in this guide to restrict the number of rows that a query returns.

  • MySQL Sort Results with ORDER BY Statement – Linux Hint

    While working with MySQL queries, the results are obtained in the same sequence as the records inserted into the schema utilizing the SELECT command. It’s the standard order for sorting. You would be aiming at how we might arrange our query result. Sorting is re-arranging the outputs of our query in a defined manner. Sorting may be done on one field or more than one field. The ORDER BY statement is being used to arrange the query results in an ascending or descending order in MySQL. The ORDER BY statement organizes data by default in go-up order if ASC or DESC is not specified. The DESC term is being used to organize the data in descending way.

  • MySQL Subqueries – Linux Hint

    A subquery is a SQL query within a greater query that is recursive, or a subquery is considered an internal query. In contrast, an outer query is termed as the query that includes the subquery. A MySQL subquery can be embedded in the queries, including SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE. Furthermore, within another subquery, a subquery may be nestled. The phrase subquery should be closed in brackets wherever it is used. We’ll teach you how and when to use MySQL subquery to compose complicated queries and describe the idea of the associated subquery. Open the command-line shell from your desktop and write your password to start using it. Press Enter and continue.

  • PostgreSQL FAQs – Linux Hint

    According to StackOverflow’s 2020 Annual Developer Survey, PostgreSQL is the second most popular database management system available, and this is not without good reason. Since its initial release in 1996, PostgreSQL, or Postgres, has improved considerably, adding several useful features, including user-defined types, table inheritance, multi-version concurrency control, and more.
    PostgreSQL is also very lightweight, easy to set up, and can be installed on several platforms, such as containers, VMs, or physical systems. Besides its default GUI, pgAdmin, Postgres also supports over 50 other IDEs, a third of which are free to use. This article will cover some of the most frequently asked questions (FAQs) about PostgreSQL.

9to5Linux Weekly Roundup: February 28th, 2021

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News

This has been a great week of Linux news and releases. We saw lots of goodies, including Kali Linux’s first ISO release in 2021 with the latest Xfce 4.16 desktop environment, a new Firefox release, a new Nitrux release, Xfce’s apps update for February, and more good things from the upcoming GNOME 40 desktop environment.

If you missed this week’s most important Linux news, distro and software releases, you can catch up with what’s new in the 9to5Linux Weekly Roundup for February 28th below.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Derivation: Peppertown video-game by Congusbongus and StarNavigator

    Thanks to the authors because the game is fully open-source and released on Github under the MIT License [2]. It was made with FLOSS tools (GIMP, VS Code, Phaser, Audacity, git, Tiled) for the MiniJam22 contest [3] and congratz to Congusbongus and StarNavigator for reaching the 2nd place with Peppertown!

  • What security does a default OpenBSD installation offer? (by solene@)

    In a recent blog post, OpenBSD developer Solène Rapenne (solene@) offers an over view of the security features offered by a default OpenBSD installation.

  • Jonathan Dieter: WANPIPE and DAHDI COPR for EL8

    At Spearline, we have a number of servers around the world with Sangoma telephony cards, which use the out-of-tree wanpipe and dahdi kernel modules. As we’ve been migrating our servers from CentOS 6 to SpearlineOS, one of the problems we’ve hit has been the out-of-tree modules don’t compile against the EL8 kernels that we use as the base for SpearlineOS. [...] If there’s any interest in using the kmod RPMs without the other packages in the COPR, I could look at splitting them into a separate COPR. Please email me if you would like me to do this.

  • Mousepad 0.5.3 Is Released

    The Xfce team has released another version of the extremely plain and simple Mousepad editor. The latest version has a keybinding for resetting the font size and some small fixes. It still lacks absolutely everything beyond the ability to edit text and load and save files. [...] Mousepad still lacks all the features other simple text-editors like KWrite have beyond the very basic ability to edit text. There is no syntax high-lighting, there is no spell-checker, you can't select text and make it uppercase or lowercase or much else for that matter. It does have a search-and-replace function, and you can load and save files, and you can even have multiple files open in tabs. It does have those things going for it even though it is severely lacking in all other areas.

Free Software and Internet/Standards

  • My Firefox addons as of Firefox 86 (and the current development version)

    I was recently reminded that my most recent entry on what Firefox addons I use is now a bit over a year old. Firefox has had 14 releases since then and it feels the start of January 2020 was an entirely different age, but my Firefox addons have barely changed in the year and a bit since that entry. Since they have updated a very small amount, I'll repeat the whole list just so I have it in one spot for the next time around.

  • Delegation of responsibility for spec finalisation

    Sean is a natural choice for me to delegate this task to. He has been involved in the development of the Gemini specification for longer than anybody other than myself - he was the first person to actually implement the protocol in software, transforming it from the largely academic thought experiment that I had created it as into an actual real world project. He is the developer of a Gemini server (GLV-1.12556) and the admin of a server running it (gemini://gemini.conman.org), which means the details of the specification are of direct and practical relevance to him. He has a long-standing presence in Gopherspace, where the Gemini project was born, and therefore understands and appreciates the value of simple-by-design systems with limited scope. Finally, he has an excellent track record of constructively engaging with the mailing list even at its busiest and most frantic, which certainly can no longer be said for me. For all these reasons I trust him to make good decisions on the basis of careful consideration.

  • A Saturday waste of CPU cycles: building time_t values

    It was bad enough trying to split up all of those date strings into their constituent parts - year, month, day - all of that stuff. But, then when I tried to consistently turn them back into a time_t, I ran into a bunch of other problems. That lead to the post called time handling is garbage. That then lead into the followup post three months later which talked about making time_t values without using mktime and the TZ variable.

Programming Leftovers

  • Revisiting Html in Java

    Some time ago I wrote a post about creating an embedded dsl for Html in Java. Sadly, it was based on an abuse of lambda name reflection that was later removed from Java. I thought I should do a followup because a lot of people still visit the old article. While it’s no longer possible to use lambda parameter names in this way, we can still get fairly close.

  • Use Dash as /bin/sh

    I want startup scripts and everything that has a #!/bin/sh shebang to use the lightest possible shell by default, but I still want my trusty bash in interactive terminal sessions, and for complex scripts.

  • How to Use Group by in Pandas Python – Linux Hint

    Pandas group by function is used for grouping DataFrames objects or columns based on particular conditions or rules. Using the groupby function, the dataset management is easier. However, all related records can be arranged into groups. Using the Pandas library, you can implement the Pandas group by function to group the data according to different kinds of variables. Most developers used three basic techniques for the group by function. First, splitting in which data divide into groups based on some particular conditions. Then, apply certain functions to these groups. In the end, combine the output in the form of data structure. In this article, we will walk through the basic uses of a group by function in panda’s python. All commands are executed on the Pycharm editor.

  • gfldex: Undocumented escape hatch

    On my quest to a custom when-statement I did quite a bit of reading. The study of roast and Actions.nqp can lead to great gain in knowledge.

  • Knowing when to look past your code

    At some point, though, your journies will take you to places where things aren’t so clear cut, and you’ll start to gain a sixth sense; a kind of visceral experience that things are not as they have been promised to be.

    A few weeks ago, that sixth sense whispered in my ear: “what if, instead of your cruddy bootloader written in a pre-1.0 systems language for a platform you don’t fully understand, it’s the 20 year-old project with 80,000 commits that’s wrong?” And it was right.

  • Cambalache…
  • C++ Friend Function – Linux Hint

    A function is a block of code that performs a certain task and provides the output. It is mainly used to eliminate repetitive code. In this tutorial, we will look into the friend function in C++ and explain its concept with working examples.

  • mrcal: principled camera calibrations

    In my day job I work with images captured by cameras, using those images to infer something about the geometry of the scene being observed. Naturally, to get good results you need to have a good estimate of the behavior of the lens (the "intrinsics"), and of the relative geometry of the cameras (the "extrinsics"; if there's more than one camera). The usual way to do this is to perform a "calibration" procedure to compute the intrinsics and extrinsics, and then to use the resulting "camera model" to process the subsequent images. Wikipedia has an article. And from experience, the most common current toolkit to do this appears to be OpenCV. People have been doing this for a while, but for whatever reason the existing tools all suck. They make basic questions like "how much data should I gather for a calibration?" and "how good is this calibration I just computed?" and "how different are these two models?" unanswerable.

Security Leftovers

                   
  • SolarWind, enough with the password already!
                     
                       

    This is a much delayed discussion on the complexity and nuance of the SolarWind hack. The simplistic and wrong messaging from some quarters of the infosec community has resulted in an atrocious misunderstanding of the hack in the public sphere. This has extended into the policy world as these bad takes are treated as cogent analysis.

  •                
  • Microsoft chief's claims on cloud security result in sharp rejoinder

    Comments made by Microsoft president Brad Smith to the US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, which held a hearing on the SolarWinds attacks last week, claiming that there is more security in the cloud than in on-premises servers, have met a tough response from former NSA hacker Jake Williams, who characterised them as having caused more harm to security than the SolarWinds attackers did in the first place. Williams, a well-known figure in the infosec community who runs his own private security outfit, Rendition Infosec, said in a tweet: "I've been thinking a LOT about Brad Smith's testimony this week about #SolariGate. He repeatedly implies that if organisations 'just' adopt a cloud first model, they won't experience these sorts of attacks. I called that reckless then, I'm doubling down now." [...] The SolarWinds attacks were first revealed by the American security firm FireEye on 9 December, when it revealed that its Red Team tools had been stolen. Five days later, FireEye issued a blog post outlining the scale of the attack as known at that stage: a global campaign to compromise public and private sector bodies through corruption of software supply chains, using software that runs on Windows. FireEye chief Kevin Mandia also gave testimony to the same committee hearing. Williams said Smith should have offered more nuance and caveats in his statements. "With his statements that lacked appropriate nuance and caveats, I predict that Smith has caused more harm to security than the Russians did with #SolariGate in the first place," he said. "Yes, I know that's a strong statement. Yes, I mean it." He added: "A lot of leadership who don't know any better heard this testimony and are constructing cloud-first directives as I type this. But they're doing it without understanding the risks and trade-offs. They're doing this without the benefit of creating a strategy first." Microsoft has made a number of statements since the attack first came to light, initially denying its products were part of the problem, but later admitting that the attackers had accessed its source code.

  •  
  • The World Economic Forum Warns That 2021 Could Be The Year Of The CyberAttacks

    Klaus Schwab, founder of the World Economic Forum and author of the book "COVID19: The Great Reset", has repeatedly warned about the possibility of devastating large-scale cyberattacks. One of his firmest warnings was given in a heartwarming speech at the WEF-sponsored Cyber Polygon event on July 24th, 2020. The World Economic Forum Centre for Cybersecurity expects the total cost of cyberattacks this year to be $6 trillion. [...] Running up-to-date free software based solutions such as Linux and *BSD is a good preventative measure against real cyberattacks. It will, sadly, not do much difference if a government decides to cut power or Internet access as part of a global "Great Reset" agenda or because inconvenient mass-demonstrations break out.

  •            
  • Switching back to OpenSSL
                 
                   

    For most users, there should be no noticeable change. If you have any packages installed that are no longer provided by Void, or your system has explicit dependencies on LibreSSL, you will of course need to take action to ensure your system continues to function after the switch.

  •               
  • Microsoft patches serious NTFS drive corruption flaw in Windows 10... but there's a catch

    Around a month and a half ago we reported about a serious flaw in Windows 10 that could be exploited to corrupt the contents of an NTFS drive. With Microsoft dawdling in its response, it was down to security researchers from OSR to produce a third-party patch. But now Microsoft has stepped up to the plate and, finally, come up with an official fix for the flaw. Sadly, it's not all good news as the fix is not currently available for everyone.